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u3 



OUR COVER 

"The Challenge," by artist Joseph R. Corish of Somerville, lawyer, and marine painter. 
Mr. Corish, who graduated from Harvard and Boston University, served five years as Art 
Director at Castle Hill Foundation, has lectured on fine arts at various colleges, and as a 
Director of the North Shore Arts Association and the Copley Society. His paintings have 
been in various exhibitions at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Busch Reisinger Museum, 
at Harvard, Yale, Boston University, Connecticut College, the Jordan Exhibition of Con- 
temporary New England Artists and various exhibitions where they have won several 
awards. 

Specializing in marine painting — his studio is located on the rocky shore of Norman's 
Woe — his paintings hang in the ward rooms of ships of the Spanish, Portuguese, and 
United States Navies, and in banks, colleges, court houses, and other public and private 
institutions. 




Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 

board of selectmen 



le Board of Selectmen is pleased to submit to you the 1970 Annual Report which is a compilation of the 
tivities of each department and board who have all worked to make Wilmington, our Town. 

i we enter 1971 we are faced with the inevitable "rising taxes", but then this has been a way of life no 
itter how far back in history one may choose to explore. 

.ke for example the Board of Selectmen's message, in part, from the 1961 Annual Report: 

"Wilmington is going to be faced with serious financial problems in the near future. 
We already have a substantial burden of debt. This could become overwhelming. 
The public debt is going to be increased constantly as the Town requires more 
schools, other public buildings, and services. The rate of that increase must be 
deterrriined by careful planning and wise decision. 

"You, the taxpayers, must make the ultimate decision. You and only you are 
invested with the legal authority to appropriate the money needed to finance these 
projects. Obviously, it is imperative that the financing be planned and executed 
with care. Priorities must be established according to the immediatene s s of the 
need of each project. Those needed most must be provided first. All others must 
be postponed. " 

le words of that Board of Selectmen were as true then as they are now. 

; we approach the 1971 Town Meeting, we will all be faced with a most difficult decision which is "how 
uch can we afford". In arriving at this decision we should not lose sight of the fact that our municipal 

rvices must continue to grow, as they have each year, in order to make Wilmington a better community 

which to live . 

our Board of Selectmen is aware of the many problems that face the Town, and we will continue to provide 
e necessary leadership to solve them in a businesslike manner. 

3 we face these new challenges, we will be without the services of Mrs. Wavie M. Drew who has announced 
at she will retire at the end of her present term. We, as a Board, pay tribute to Mrs. Drew for her 
t.tiring efforts as a devoted servant of the Town over the years and wish her good health in the years 
( come. 

Respectively submitted, 

Bruce Mac Donald, Chairman 
Wavie M. Drew 
James R. Miceli 
James F. Banda 
Carl A. Backman, Jr. 



1 



1 ow'x OF Wilmington 



MASSACHUSETTS 01887 



OFFICE OF THE 
TOWN MANAGER 



AREA CODE 6 
658-3311 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

If you are just a little tired of hearing that: 

drugs, crime and vandalism are destroying local government, and that our total 
collapse is just around the corner 

the economic future of our Cities and Towns is probably oblivion 

our problems of rising educational cost, state welfare cost, and environment 
protection cost are utterly insoluble 

. . . . then may I suggest another point of view. It is just possible that: 

they aren't and it won't 

it may not be 

they aren't 

.... if we dedicate a little time and effort to creative solutions to municipal problems which are not alway 
time tested but innovative. Wilmington has always been willing to move ahead of the crowd, with the 
results historically of being able to control its tax rate better than most of its neighbors, according to the 
population and tax rate figures released by the State Tax Commission of Massachusetts. 

The ship of State to be sure is plowing through turbulent waters which should create for us all an oppor- 
tiinity to do better, use our skills and imagination, and chart a new course for our future well-being as it 
pertains to the Town of Wilmington. During the past year, we either completed or started on the followin 
projects. 

Established Goals and Objectives for the future development of Wilmington. 

Created a Capital Improvement Program using the sophisticated advanced financial and 
planning tool of computer technology to develop cost data for future implementation. 
A listing of these projects follows this letter. 

Started municipal equipment cost accounting and public utility cost controls on rising 
cost centers within our government. 



2 



Hired professional consultants and well qualified department heads to give us the best 
opportunity to provide problem solving technique and quality service. To be more 
specific, I refer to the addition of the services of Avco of Wilmington; our planning 
consultant, Prof. Charles Eliot of Harvard; our professional Sealer of Weights & 
Measures, Mr. Martin Farrell; our new professional Library Director, Mr. J. Slinn; 
and our new professional Recreation Director, Mr. Kenneth Zucker. Ken just 
completed his Master's degree in Recreation. 

Encouraged the professional development of other Town employees with special courses 
at Salem State College, Bentley College, Lowell Technical Institute, University of 
Mass. , Boston College, Northeastern University, Harvard University and others. 

Final approval of land assembly project for a future Industrial Park through the hard 
work of the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority. 

Instigated a new system of tax title foreclosures to speed up the process of making non- 
revenue producing property a future asset instead of a current tax liability. 

Accepted State and Federal funds for the sanitary sewer interceptor extension project. 

Created a Town Hall Annex with added health personnel and inspection services. 

Started a night patrol of our schools and other Town buildings through our volunteer 
Civil Defense unit to help control vandalism. 

Constructed the Salem Street wellfield and pipe lines for the protection and development 
of this natural resource which is vital to any community, and which is thinking of the well- 
being of its citizens of the future. 

Finalized the planning and administrative tool called the Comprehensive Master Plan for 
better land use and control of the future environment and present community assets. 
A summary report of this plan is found in the back of this Annual Report. 

Funded the acquisition of land and buildings to preserve and expand the Silver Lake 
recreation area, and acquired conservation land. 

Approved future site acquisition and development of additional public housing for the elderly. 

Greatly expanded our recreation program for all age brackets, and the construction of 
additional recreation facilities. 

Sponsored many improvements to our Zoning laws. Building By-law and created a new 
High Density Traffic Business District to control the best use of our land. 

Joined a regional drug rehabilitation program to help control the misuse of dangerous 
narcotics. 



3 



From this limited listing of past and current events, you can readily see that your government is involved, 
and we believe constructively, in almost all phases of community living. Our goal, that is to say, of the 
paid full time employees is to become more qualified in our jobs, to protect with your help the physical 
environment of our water, air, and lands, and to provide essential services for the citizen, who chose to 
to reside in Wilmington. 

I wish to acknowledge that the progress, which has been made over the past year, is due to the leadership 
provided by the Board of Selectmen, and the outstanding caliber and cooperation of all department heads 
and employees. 

The Town of Wilmington will benefit most of all in the future by your presence at Town Meeting. 
Please plan to attend. 



Respectfully submitted. 

Sterling C. fiMorri 
Town Manager 



Municipal Shopping List of Capital Needs 



Name 

1 School 

2 Sidewalks 

3 Public Works Equip. 

4 Police Vehicles 

5 Dump 

6 Fire Station Land 

7 Fire Sub-Station 

8 Recreation 

9 Traffic Lights 



Yr. 
71 

71 
71 
71 
71 
71 
71 

71 
71 



Capital 
Cost 

$13, 600, 000 



50, 000 etc. 

60, 000 etc. 
9, 000 etc. 
400, 000 

20, 000 
180, 000 

200, 000 
15, 000 etc. 



Financing 
20 yr. bond 

Tax 
Tax 
Tax 

3% down, 20 yr. bond 
Tax 

3 yr. stabiliz. fund 
10 yr. bond in 4th yr. 

5% down, 10 yr. bond 

Tax 



Annual 
Op. Expense 

0, 0, 42, 000, 
'84, 000, etc. 



Reimbur sem« 



$6, 120, 000 



30, 000, etc. 



0, 0, 0, 

54, 000, etc. 



100, 000 



500, etc. 



4 



Name 



rown Hall 



Yr. 



Capital 
Cost 



71 $ 250,000 



A. utomat. Scrubbers 71 
Police Station Addition 71 

Youth Center 71 

Tennis Courts 71 

Tennis Court Lights 71 

Skating Rink 71 

Ambulance 72 

Fire Brush Truck 72 

Conservation 72 

Arterial Streets 72 

Street Lights 72 

Sewers 72 

Maintenance Garage 73 

School Sidewalks 73 

Parking Lot 73 

Cemetery 74 

Arterial Streets 74 

Historical District 74 

Water 74 

IDrains 75 

Arterial Streets 76 



2, 000 etc. 
75, 000 
50, 000 
13, 000 etc. 
5, 500 etc. 
500, 000 
25, 000 
20, 000 
25, 000 etc. 
200, 000 
7, 000 etc. 
12, 000, 000 
40, 000 

30, 000 
80, 000 
40, 000 
200, 000 
100, 000 
1, 700, 000 
2, 000, 000 
200, 000 



Financing 

3 yr. stabiliz. fund 

Tax in 4th yr. 

10 yr. bond in 5th yr. 

Tax 

3% down, 3 yr. bond 

Tax 

Tax 

Tax 

4% down, 15 yr. bond 

Tax 

Tax 

Tax 

5% down, 10 yr. bond 
Tax 

20 yr. bond 

10% down, 5 yr. bond 

Tax 

5% down, 10 yr. bond 
10% down, 5 yr. bond 
5% down, 5 yr. bond 
10% down, 5 yr. bond 
20 yr. bond 
2% down, 20 yr. bond 
5% down, 5 yr. bond 



Annual 
Op. Expense 

9, 000 in 
6th yr. 



Re imbu r s e me nt 



3, 000, etc. 

900, etc. 
30, 000, etc. 



5, 000, etc. 



12, 500 



18, 750etc. 



3, 000, 000 



50, 000 



IFor bonded projects: level principal payments with interest rate = 5. 5 percent 
Water and sewer projects (projects 22 and 29) are assumed self-supporting 



5 



Directory of Officials - January 1, 1970 - 1971 



Board of Selectmen 



Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 
Wavie M. Drew 
James F. Banda 
James R. Miceli 
Carl A. Backman, Jr. 



Town Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



School Coinmittee 



John Brooks, Chairman 

Walter J. McNamara, Vice Chairman 

L. Barbara Hooper, Secretary 

Nancy H. Clark 

Arnold F. Lanni 

Diana C. Imbimbo 



Superintendent of Schools 



Walter H. Pierce 



Finance Committee 



Harry T. Stewart, Jr. , Chairman 
Christian G. Bachman, Vice Chairman 
Rodney E. Laughton, Secretary 
Richard V. Barry 
Hugh H. Callahan 
Richard D. Howlett 
Charles F. Mather 
Madelyn A. McKie 
Arthur F. Spear, Jr. 



Boards, Committees, and Commissions 



- January 1, 1970 - 



1971 



)peal, Board of 



)bert E. Jennings, Chairman 
rank F. Santo, Secretary 
II Iward T. Welch 
Llliam A. Caperci, Associate 
ter Enos, Associate 
orge G. Robertie, Associate 

ssessors, Board of 



ithony E. Krzeminski, Principal 
Dy P. McClanahan 
ive M. Sheldon 

irter Lecture Fund Committee 



adelon C. Slater, Chairman 
arjorie M. Emery, Secretary 
cqueline C. Piatt 
ildred E. Neilson 
snneth H. Wilson 

;metery Commissioners 



illis C. Lyford, Chairman 
illiam F. Cavanaugh 
tiomas H. McMahon 

■onservation Commission 



rthur W. Bureau, Chairman 

rsula M. Leahy, Vice Chairman 

armello F. Colombo 

me Curley 

obert G. Gamlin 

rancis A. Ottati 

avid J. Townley 

rug Committee 



ester E. White, Chairman 

laire Cabral 

obert Crispo 

a.mes Durkee 

onald Garland 

ean D. Kritter 

eorge A. Mosher 

lections Officers 



arold E. Melzar, Warden 
tanley Webber, Deputy Warden 
Catherine E. Leverone, Clerk 
>oretta R. Caira, Dep. Clerk 
lildred A. Dolan, Inspector 
)live M. Sheldon, Inspector 
lorence A. Balkus, Dep. Inspector 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Dep. Inspector 



1971 
1973 
1972 
1971 
1971 
1971 



1973 
1973 
1973 
1971 
1972 



1972 
1973 
1971 



1973 
1972 
1971 
1973 
1971 
1971 
1972 



Annually 



Health, Board of 

Joseph A. Paglia, Chairman 1972 

Marion C. Boylen 1973 

James J. Durkee 1971 

Housing Authority 

Earl W. Zimmerman, Chairman 1973 

Rep. of State Housing Board 

Wilson J. Belbin, Vice Chairman 1971 

Florence E. Borofsky, Secretary 1972 

Charles F. Lounsbury, Treasurer 1975 

Library Trustees 

Shirley F. Callan, Chairman 1972 

Albert J. Blackburn, Jr. , Secretary 1973 

E. Hayward Bliss 1973 

Philip B. Buzzell 1972 

Evelyn M. Norton 1971 

Roland I. Wood 1971 

Park 8i Recreation Commission 

Charlotte Stewart, Chairman 1973 

Carl A. Backman 1971 

Americo Catalano 1971 

John J. Waugh 1972 

Joseph H. Woods Jr. 1973 

Permanent Building Committee 

Robert B. Michelson, Chairman 1971 

Raymond G. McClure, Secretary 1973 

William R. Harrison 1973 

David A. Holbrook 1972 

Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 1972 

Planning Board 

William G. Hooper, Jr. , Chairman 1974 

Morton Grant, Secretary 1973 

A. Daniel Gillis 1972 

William J. Hanlon 1971 

Zane Bower 1972 

Redevelopment Authority 

Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 1971 

Rene J. LaRivee, Vice Chairman 1972 

Robert F. Leahy, Sec. & Acting Director 1973 

Richard W. Thackeray, Treasurer 1974 

Milton L. Bradford, Asst. Treasurer 1974 

Regional Vocational/Technical 
School Committee 

Eugene L. Kritter 1971 

Frank H. McLean 1973 



7 



Boards, Committees, and Commissions 



Advisory Committees 



Registrars, Board of 

F. Talbot Emery, Chairman 

Mary G. Condrey 

Robert L. Cavanaugh 

Esther L. Russell, Clerk 

Trustees of Trust Funds 
Harold E. Melzar, Chairman 
Mary E. Denault, Secretary 
Arnold C. Blake 

Water & Sewer Commissioners 
Arnold C. Blake, Chairman 
Vincent R. McLain 
Robert Mullarky 



Personnel Advisory Board 

1972 A. John Imbimbo 
1974 Thomas L. Mitchell 

1973 Robert J. Woods 

By-Law Study Committee 
Joan M. Bachman, Chairman 

1973 Stella Courtney 

1972 Milton B. Cram 

1971 John E. Nealon 

Stanley Webber 

1971 Ice Skating Rink Committee 

1972 Carl A. Backman 

1973 Florence C. Ryan 
David W. Trickett 



Officers 8; Department Heads - January 1, 1970 - 1971 



Accountant Robert H. Peters 

Administrative Assistant Mary E. Denault 

Animal Inspector Joseph V. Balestrieri 

Building Inspector Roy P. McClanahan 

Cemetery Superintendent Francis E. Downs 

Constables Arthur J. Kelley, A. John Imbimbo 

Director of Recreation Kenneth J. Zucker 

Dog Officer Joseph V. Balestrieri 

Engineer Arthur E. Harding, Jr. 

Fence Viewer Edmund H. Sargent, Maurice D. O'Neil 

Fire Chief Arthur J. Boudreau 

Gas Inspector William R. Harrison 

Highway Superintendent . Robert P. Palmer 

Ipswich River Watershed Commission Bruce MacDonald 

Librarian John D. J. Slinn 

Medical Agent, Board of Health Gerald A, Fagan, M. D. 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council Madelyn A. McKie 

Milk Inspector Ernest F. Romano 

Nurse, Public Health Anne Butters, R. N, 

Nurses, School Helen E. Martin, R.N. , Sylvia Levine, R.N. 

Physician, School Gerald A. Fagan, M. D. 

Plumbing Inspector William R. Harrison 

Public Buildings Superintendent " Fredericks. Jaeschke 

Police Chief Paul J. Lynch 

Sealer of Weights and Measures Martin P. Farrell 

Slaughtering Inspector Ernest F. Romano 

Town Clerk Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk (Assistant) Margaret A. Wagstaff 

Town Collector Marion C. Murphy 

Town Collector (Deputy) Catherine P. Lindmark 

Town Counsel Alan Altman 

Town Sanitarian Ernest F. Romano 

Town Treasurer Mary E. Denault 

T reasurer (Assistant) Elizabeth R. Fosgate 

Tree Warden h Moth Superintendent Thomas O. Sullivan 

Veteran's Agent Paul A. Farrell 

Water Superintendent Kenneth C. Motschman 

Wire Inspector Charles L. Webster 

Veteran's Grave Officer Paul A. Farrell 



8 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1970 
otal Appropriation (Taxation) $6, 433, 004. 39 

otal Appropriation (Available Funds) 181, 783. 30 $6, 614, 787. 69 

mount Necessary to Satisfy Final Court Judgements 
otal Deficits 
:hool Lunch Program 
ree Public Libraries 

atural Resources, Self Help Program 
ppropriation Overdrafts 
ounty Retirement Assessment 
ounty Tax 

ounty Tax (1969 Underestimates) 
ounty Hospital Assessment 
Late Recreation Areas 

cate Recreation Areas (1969 Underestimates) 
Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 
Lass. Bay T ransporation Authority 
iotor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 
)swich River Watershed District 

.)swich River Watershed District (1969 Underestimates) 

verlay of Current Year ■ 143, 477. 36 $ 608,447.80 

Gross Amount to be Raised $7, Z23, 235. 49 

ess Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 



7, 050. 


00 


7, 560. 


50 


33, 977. 


68 


3, 118. 


75 


5, 500. 


00 


11, 871. 


72 


95, 550. 


00 


103, 442. 


49 


8, 796. 


42 


11, 652. 


06 


19, 462. 


44 


375. 


83 


65, 075. 


46 


87, 925. 


00 


1, 550. 


85 


1, 509. 


47 


551. 


77 


143, 477 


36 



970 Estimated Receipts from Local Aid and Agency Funds 


$1,415, 502. 


06 


[otor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 


378, 861. 


97 


icense s 


4, 000. 


00 


ines 


4, 322. 


00 


pecial Assessments 


9,263. 


09 


eneral Government 


6, 056. 


98 


rotection of Persons and Property 


12, 124. 


39 


ealth and Sanitation 


4, 552. 


44 


ighways 


4, 981. 


04 


chool (Local Receipts of School Committee) 


2, 235. 


80 


ibraries 


1,210. 


54 


emeterie s 


6, 152. 


67 


iterest 


91,901. 


03 


arm Animal 


213. 


69 


mbulance Collections 


3, 003. 


00 


ewer Revenue 


18, 517. 


98 


lisc. Receipts 


8, 501. 


86 


Total Estimated Receipts 


$1, 971, 400. 


54 



verestimates 2, 148. 95 

oted From Available Funds 181, 783. 30 



otal Available Funds 183, 932. 25 



Total Estimated Receipts $2, 155, 332. 79 

Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation $5, 067, 902. 70 



9 



Town Collector 



TOTAL COMMITMENTS - 1970 



$5, 629, 472. 5f 



1970 Real Estate 

1970 Water Liens 

1970 App. Street Betterment 

Committed Interest 

1970 App. Water Betterment 

Committed Interest 

1970 Motor Vehicle Excise 

1970 Personal Property 

1970 Farm 

1969 Motor Vehicle Excise 

1968 Motor Vehicle Excise 

App. Street Betterment - Paid in Full 

Committed Interest 

App. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 



4, 918, 288. 2C| 
10, 955. 711 

5, 144. 5t' 
Z, 242. 7( , 

6, 064. 92I 
2, 721. 7f'!i 

456, 473. 611 
152, 600. 7C( 
162. 3?! 
68, 081. IE 
9. 9C 
2, 820. 84 ! 

25. 58;; 
1, 975. Ti- 
14. 6^ 



COLLECTIONS - 1970 



1970 



1969 



Others 



Real Estate 
Water Liens 
App. Street Betterment 
Committed Interest 
App. Water Betterment 
Committed Interest 
Motor Vehicle Excise 
Personal Property- 
Farm Animal 

App. Street Betterment Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 

App. Water Betterment Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 
Interest & Costs - All Years 
Municipal Lien Certificates and 
Certificates Dis. Betterments 
Ambulance 
Advertising Charges 
Registry of Motor Vehicle Releases 
Water Department Collections 

TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



$4, 638, 886. 62 
9, 120. 08 
4, 834. 77 
2, 166. 68 
4, 461. 34 
2, 028. 70 
350, 718. 13 
71, 954. 40 
162. 38 
2, 820. 84 
25. 58 
1, 975. 77 
14. 64 
20, 365. 80 

849. 00 
3, 379. 00 
27. 50 
182. 00 
337, 897. 76 



$184, 086. 96 
1, 727. 10 
1 14. 74 
62. 36 
580. 12 
336. 04 
71, 751. 91 
3, 739. 20 



40, 802. 82 
530. 9C 
78. 02: 
52. 28. 
465. 73) 
314. 03' 
4, 986. 52 
5. 25 



$5, 761, 504. 97 



10 



Board of Registrars 



a accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars are 
eld on the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and the conduct of business. Under 
Ihapter 626 of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it is so posted in the 
'own Hall. 

rhis was a busy year, with Town meetings. State Primaries and a State Election. The board met many 
' venings to certify names on nomination papers, and Warrant Articles. There were many drastic changes 
n the election laws this year, especially the fact that 18, 19 and 20 year olds may be registered to vote 
Lnd the residence requirement is now only six months. Also, there is no requirement for the voter to be 
bble to read or write. 

Yomen, married prior to January 1, must re-register under their marriage name. Naturalized citizens 
must have their naturalization papers with them when registering. 

in order to keep the voting list as up to date as possible, the Board annually compares the voting list with 
ihe yearly census, If a voter's name does not appear in the census, it is subject to removal from the 
/oting register. 

(Jew residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence in the 
lown. Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention of the Board 
o that your name will not be removed from the voting list inadvertently. 

"his year we have had two resignations from the board. . .Mr. Joseph P. Ring and Mrs. Margaret Imbimbo. 
Ar. Robert L. Cavanaugh was elected to fill Mr. Ring's term and Mrs. Mary G. Condrey was appointed 
inanimously to fill the vacancy caused by Mrs. Imbimbo's resignation. Mr. F. Talbot Emery was elected 
-s our new Chairman. 



1970 POPULATION - (estimated) 



17, 100 



1970 DOGS LISTED - 



1,963 



HEGISTERED VOTERS AS OF JANUARY 1, 1970 (estimated) 



Democrats 

Republicans 

Undeclared 



3, 030 
1, 145 
3, 023 
7, 198 



Total 



11 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as Amended: 



Births - final figure for 1969 

Births - actually recorded to date for 1970 



285 
276 



Marriage Intentions recorded 



210 



Marriages recorded 



220 



Deaths recorded 



93 



Chapter 46, Section 15: 1 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical office i 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. | 

Chapter 46, Section 15: J 

Nineteen (19) Burial Permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Healthil 
in 1970. Two (2) transfers within Wildwood Cemetery and eight (8) out-of-state deaths reported and filed 



Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables: 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in i 



the Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March 



If not registered by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority after a public hearing. 



in this office. 



TOWN RECORDS 



Inflammable s 



94 



Other records: 



Uniform Commercial Code recordings 
Uniform Commercial Code terminations 
Federal Tax Lien recordings 
Dog Licenses issued as of January 15, 1971 
Duplicate dog tags issued - January 15, 1971 
Business Certificates recorded 

Business Certificates recorded (women doing business on separate checking acct. ) 
Business withdrawals 
Fish & Game licenses 
Pole Locations 



612 
39 
27 



1685 



31 
20 
2 
2 

901 
25 



12 



ither Records: (continued) 



Medical Registration 

Bazaars and Raffles 

Identification liquor purchase cards 




7 
9 



Ither Service s: 



Keep minutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up to date. (Certify same when requested. ) 
Town Clerk has complete charge of elections. Record election results. 
Send State election results to State House forthwith. 

Keep Jury List up to date. Draw Jurors when court orders come through. 
Certified an estimated (200) copies of Births, Marriages and Deaths. 

Certified (3Z0) estimated births - Abstract form - used for school entrances, drivers' licenses, 

out of state travel and job applications. 
Proof of residence; by letter or card - undetermined number. 
Miscellaneous sales of books and maps - undetermined number. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 
Occasionally appear in Court for the Town when summoned - producing all papers and maps 
required. 

Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by Selectmen. 
Certify same. 

Record Board of Appeal Decisions - Keep file of decisions by Town Counsel. 
Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 
Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all zoning and Town By-Law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear Town Officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 



The Town Clerk, in her capacity as a Justice of the Peace, certified an undetermined number of 
legal papers for town officers. Married couples by appointment when presented with the proper 
c redentials . 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, I 
have - 

Met with the Board on regular meetings and special meetings. 
Kept the minutes of the Board up to date. 
Worked with the Police on the census. 
Kept the voting list up to date. 
Registered voters during office hours. 

Supervised the distribution and filing of Nomination papers. 

Prepared the ballot and ordered the printing of same. Supervised the printing of the 

"Persons' Listed" book. 
Hired election workers. Prepared payrolls for election workers. 



rhere is a new supply of books, "Births, Marriages and Deaths" from 1730 to 1898, compiled by James E. 
•velley available at the Town Clerk's office for the price of $2. 00 per copy. 



13 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town Counsel 
covering the year 1970. 

A. On January 1, 1970, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of 
actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax 
lien foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking). 

Richard Donahue v. Town of Wilmington, etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Action to 
recover damages for blasting). 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Suffolk Superior Court (Action to recover $2, 174. 62 for aid to 
various indigent persons). 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity for appeal for 
variance of zoning by-laws). 

Paul Bongiorno, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking). 

Town of Wilmington v. Magee Construction Company, Inc. of Arlington, etal, Middlesex Superior 
Court (Action to restrain the removal of soil, loam, sand or gravel). 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages). 

Glen Avenue Realty Corp. , Inc. v. Board of Health, Superior Court on appeal to Supreme Judicial 
Court (Petition for writ of mandamus to require issuance of sanitary permit). 

James A. Demos v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Action to 
recover for property damage). 

Fiilton Railing, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, Essex Superior Court (Action to recover balance due on 
contract). 

Milk Street Construction Company v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (Claim 
for arbitration before American Arbitration Association concerning building contract). 

Joseph Scaro, etal v. County of Middlesex, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking). 

Town of Wilmington v. John Benevento, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the remove 
of soil, loam, sand or gravel). 

14 



Wales Co. dba Brewsters of Massachusetts, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
Claim for money had and received; money paid by mistake). 

Avco Corporation v. Board of Assessors, Supreme Judicial Court (Finding for appellant, Avco 
corporation, and on appeal to Supreme Judicial Court). 

William Bowers, Jr. , etux v. County of Middlesex, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for 
.ssessment of damages for land taking). 

City of Boston v. Treasurer & Receiver-General of the Commonwealth, etals, Middlesex Superior 
lourt (Declaratory action by City of Boston to reduce its proportionate assessment of MDC charges by 
.pproximately 1. 7 million dollars and cause the same to be redistributed). 

Robert W. Wisleder, etux v. County of Middlesex, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for 
.ssessment of damages for land taking). 

David B. Hill, etux v. County of Middlesex, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
»f damages for land taking). 

Timothy P. Benoit, etux v. County of Middlesex, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assess- 
nent of damages for land taking). 

Fred Drinkwater, dba v. Milk Street Construction Co. ,Inc. etal Suffolk Superior Court (Petition to 
jstablish a statutory lien). 

Joseph J. Flynn, Inc. , v. Board of Appeals, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision 
)f the Board of Appeals). 

Richardson Electrical Co. , Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Demand for direct 
)ayment under Chapter 30, section 39F). 

Carl M. Jensen, etals v. Board of Appeals, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (A ppeal from decision of 
ioard of Appeals). 

Robert P. Stevens, Tr. , etal v. Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners Middlesex Superior Court 
Claim for money had and received). 

Town of Wilmington v. Outdoor Advertising Board, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for review of 
ssuance of permit for outdoor billboard). 

i-There are pending as of January 1, 1971, 45 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
Board, many involving claims for several different years. 

B. (1) During the year 1970, the following new actions were brought against the Town or its officers 
or agents: - 

Massachusetts General Hospital v. Town of Wilmington, Municipal Court of the City of Boston (Action 
bo recover $108. 64 for aid to indigent persons). 

Massachusetts General Hospital v. Town of Wilmington, Municipal Court of the City of Boston (Action 
to recover $177. 45 for aid to indigent persons). 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the 
Board of Appeals). 



15 



Carl M. Jensen, etal v. Robert E. Jennings (Board of Appeals), Middlesex Superior Court, (Appeal 



from decision of Board of Appeals granting special permit). 



John J. Elia v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middle sex Supe rior Court (Petition for writ of certiorari 
concerning revocation of a gasoline storage license). 

B. (2) During the year 1970, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: - 

Town of Wilmington v. Dorchester Minot Co-operative Bank, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit to recovei 
money deposited for completion of municipal services under the Subdivision Control Law). 

Town of Wilmington v. James King, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Ejectment subsequent 
to property being acquired by the Town). 

Town of Wilmington v. Paul McCabe, dba Middlesex Superior Court (Petition to enforce Sanitary Code] 

Town of Wilmington v. Urena Kleynen, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Ejectment sub- 
sequent to property being acquired by the Town). 

1 

Town of Wilmington v. Marcia A. Murphy, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Ejectment 
subsequent to property being acquired by the Town). 

C. During the year 1970, the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of: - 1 

I 

City of Boston v. Town of Wilmington, Suffolk Superior Court (Disposed of by agreement for neither i 
party). | 

i 

Town of Wilmington v. Dorchester Minor Co-operative Bank, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed ', 
of by payment of $9, 728. 71 to the Town of Wilmington). j 

James A. Demos v. Town of Wilmington, etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed 
of by payment of $208. 84 by the insurance company to the plaintiff). i 

Joseph J. Flynn, Inc. v. Board of Appeals, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Final Decree dismissing • 
bill) '. 

Town of Wilmington v. James King, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by 
execution for possession). 

Massachusetts General Hospital v. Town of Wilmington, Municipal Court of the City of Boston (Dis- 
posed of by payment of execution in the amount of $60. 00). 

Massachusetts General Hospital v. Town of Wilmington, Municipal Court of the City of Boston (Dis- 
posed of by payment of execution in the amount of $80. 00). 

Town of Wilmington v. Paul McCabe dba, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by final decree 
restraining respondent). 

Milk Street Construction Company v. Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (Disposeci 
of by arbitrator's award in the amount of $30, 628. 47 and payment to the contractor on behalf of the 
Permanent Building Committee). 

Town of Wilmington v. Outdoor Advertising Board, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by final 
decree dismissing bill after expiration of permit for billboard). 



16 



Richardson Electrical Co. , Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by 
lyment of execution in the amount of $1, 800. 00 being the balance due from the Town to the general 
mtractor). 

Town of Wilmington v. Urena Kleynen, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by 
cecution for possession). 

Town of Wilmington v. Magee Construction Co. , Inc. of Arlington, etal Middlesex Superior Court 
)isposed of by final decree regulating gravel removal). 

City of Boston v. Treasurer & Receiver-General of the Commonwealth, etals, Middlesex Superior 
ourt (Disposed of by final decree dismissing bill on petition of the City of Boston for reduction of its 
jwerage charges). 

Town of Wilmington v. Marcia A. Murphy, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by 
<ecution for possession). 

Carl M. Jensen, etals v. Board of Appeals, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Remanded back to the 
oard of Appeals for further action). 

Fulton Railing, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, Essex Superior Court (Disposed of by agreement for 
sither party after payment of balance due on contract). 

Glen Avenue Realty Corp. , Inc. v. Board of Health, Superior Court on appeal to Supreme Judicial 
lourt (Disposed of by dismissal of petition after appeal to Supreme Judicial Court). 



Avco Corporation v. Board of Assessors, Supreme Judicial Court (Disposed of by dismissal of petition 
iter appeal to Supreme Judicial Court). 

Fred Drinkwater dba v. Milk Street Construction Co. , Inc. , etal Suffolk Superior Court (Disposed of by 
nal decree dismissing Bill of Complaint). 



Town Treasurer 



ash on Hand - January 1, 1970 
Ceceipts 
disbursements 

i;ash on Hand - December 31, 1970 
avestments: 

)uring 1970 the program of investing idle 
esulting profit of $28, 276. 13. 



589, 527. 29 
13, 610, 800. 50 
13, 334, 569. 45 

865, 758. 34 

s from Bond Issues and Revenue Funds was continued with a 



17 



Planning Board 



Another busy year has been concluded by the Planning Board. Not only do the members spend late hours 
at our meetings, but they are active also in other planning functions: 

(a) Region 5A of the Massachusetts Federation of Planning Boards (Director; Secretary) 

(b) Member and alternate to SILC (Subregional Intertown Liaison Committee) ' 

(c) Metropolitan Area Planning Council (member, and consultant on the Executive Committee) 

(d) Planning Board representative at Board of Appeals hearings 

(e) Ad Hoc committee for School Building Needs - '4 

Each of these functions has a bearing on planning for the Tov^n of Wilmington. The M. F. P. B. gives us 
contact with other towns in the area. Many of our problems are similar in nature, and a solution found 
elsewhere can possibly be adapted to our particular situation. Also we can help some one else. 

SILC was originally formed to combat the proposal of the D. P. W. to slice through several towns (includinj.| 
Wilmington) with a new Route 6Z. This road has been variously described as a "boulevard", a "highway ; 
between 1Z8 and 495", "not a superhighway", "for local traffic", etc. The indications are that the 
D. P. W. 's intended layouts could seriously further impair our north-south travel within the town. 

The M. A. P. C. has become increasingly more valuable. In addition to reports and recommendations, i 
approval by this Agency is required on certain projects that are funded in part by the Federal government:'! 
For example, intercession of the M. A. P. C. into the Richmond Street Bridge project should insure grantir i 
of our requests for improved drainage, better approaches, and the addition of sidewalk layout on the bridg ' 

Some of the statistics for last year include: 

(1) Eleven public hearings held. These ran the gamut of subdivision rescissions, definitive plans fo 
subdivisions, and articles for Town Meetings. 

(2) Six decisions on new subdivisions. Two were conditionally approved, and four were rejected for ' 
cause. 

(3) Three decisions on subdivision modifications. Two were approved, and one was disapproved. 

(4) Incompleted subdivision. After hearings, two had approval rescinded. Three lost their bondsa 
to the Town. 

(5) Ninety plans "not requiring approval" were submitted. Of these, 69 were signed, 17 were rejecte? 
and 4 were withdrawn by the applicants. 



18 



; (6) Underground wiring. Planning Board Rules and Regulations now stipulate that all new subdivisions 
must have all wiring placed underground. Not only will this improve the aesthetics, but also 
negates the possibility of wiring falling to the ground during ice or wind storms. 

(7) Wet Lands protection. The Planning Board's proposal under Flood Plain Zoning went "down the 
drain" at the Annual Town Meeting. Although a majority of voters agreed, we failed to get the 
necessary two-thirds vote. It is still our contention that the State Statutes do not provide the 
protection needed. It should be noted that almost 30% of Wilmington is considered as being "wet", 
and at least our streams could be protected. 

(8) High Density Zoning. This was initiated by a request from the Board of Selectmen to give them a 
tool to further control certain uses that had been allowed under General Business and Industrial 
Zones. The Special Town Meeting overwhelmingly endorsed the concept proposed by the Planning 
Board. 



(9) Capital Budget Planning. In order to provide the Finance Committee, the Town Manager, and the 
Town Meetings with variable data on capital expenditures, the Planning Board funded a capital 
budget planning project through Avco Computer Services. The first step is expected to be avail- 
able for the March 1971 Town Meeting. It is planned to continue the project so that a Financial 
Model will be constructed. 

(10) Citizens' Advisory Committees. General meetings have been held with many interested citizens 
attending. Expansion of activities will be forthcoming in certain areas. 

(11) 701 Project. Last, but not least, the 701 project (also known as the "Master Plan") is completed. 
Because of the great amount of detail in the complete report, a concise summary is presented in 
the Annual Town Report. 

I'he five member volunteer board is supported by a professional planning consultant (Prof. Charles W. 
;iiot), a part-time clerk (Mrs. Evelyn Burke), a part-time planner (Mr. Denis Hazam), and the services 
f the Town Engineer (Mr. Arthur Harding). Without them, it would have been difficult to continue to try 
o make Wilmington a better place to call home. 

i 



By-law Study Committee 



Lt the 1970 Annual Town Meeting, the By-Law Study Committee was granted a one year extension of time 
D complete the assigned study as set forth under Article 3 1 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 8, 1969. 

i'he committee has continued to meet regularly on a bi-weekly schedule with extra meetings and work 
essions for re-writing and editing of the By-Laws. We have continued interviewing Town officials and 
ave evaluated their recommendations. Consideration has been given to the By-Laws of comparable 
' ommunitie s . 

Lfter a series of discussions with Town Counsel, the recommended "By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
Wilmington" as revised, were presented to the Board of Selectmen for inclusion as a Warrant Article for 
(tie March, 1971 Town Meeting. 



19 



Police Department 



I hereby respectfully submit my Annual Report of the activities of the Wilmington Police Department 
the year 1970. 



for 



ARRESTS 



TRAFFIC ARRESTS 



Assault & Battery 


42 


Drivers License Violation 


Breaking & Entering & Larceny 


96 


Endangering 


Disorderly Conduct 


71 


Leaving the Scene of Accident 


Drunkenne s s 


104 


Operating under Influence 


Juvenile s 


158 


Operating Unregistered, Uninsured 


Sex Offenses 


16 


Speeding 


All Others 


117 


Using Motor Vehicle Without Authority 




604 


Others 


COMPLAINTS & 


MISCELLANEOUS 


Assaults Reported; 




Larceny Complaints: (continued) 


Gun 


4 


Theft of Auto Parts 


Knife 


6 


Theft of Bicycles 


Hands, Feet, etc. 


3 


Theft from Buildings 


Other Dangerous Weapon 


50 


All Other Larceny 


Others, Not Aggravated 


49 


Licenses to Carry Firearms Issued 


Automobile Accidents 


620 


Licenses Suspended or Revoked (M/V) 


Automobiles Stolen 


78 


Lost and Found Articles Reported 


Bicycles Registered 


80 


Malicious Damage Cases Investigated 


Buildings Broken Into 


263 


Missing Persons Reported 


Complaints Received 


11,909 


Prowlers Reported 


Cruisers Dispached to Calls 


7, 349 


Robberies (armed) 


Disturbances Reported 


1, 819 


Robberies (unarmed) 


Domestic Problems Reported 


473 


Sex Offenses Reported: 


Emergency Trips with Cruisers 


355 


Ince st 


Fatal Accidents 


5 


Rape by Force 


Firearm Dealers Permits Issued 


3 


Attempted Rape 


Firearm Indentification Cards Issued 


120 


Indecent Exposure 


Fires Responded to 


189 


Indecent Assault 


House Checks (Vacation) 


432 


Indecent or Obscene Calls 


Juvenile Complaints 


1, 020 


Lewd and Lascivious 


Juvenile Court Cases 


58 


Obscene Literature 


Juvenile Cases, Department Handled 


100 


Others 


Larceny Complaints: 




Sudden Deaths 


Purse Snatching 


1 


Suicides (including attempts) 


Shoplifting 


3 


Summonses Delivered 


Theft from Autos 


23 





7i:Cc 
1 

1 * 
lili 

26 

2 i^e: 
15 :i 

56 i 



6 
35 
36 
13 
15 

5381 
4'i 

11 1 

i< 
i 

ilR 



1 



3 



li "1 

5.' ^' 
1 

61i II 



20 



le figures as presented in this report give a resume of the number of times we did this thing or that 
ring the year, and it involves a lot of officers doing a lot of work throughout the year. 

le year 1970 saw some changes in the field of "Specialist" to improve the efficiency of the Department, 
jpointment of Sergeant Charles Ellsworth as Training Officer is most appreciated! Charlie has earned 
s Associate Degree in Law Enforcement from Northeastern University and has set up some very worth- 
die programs in his short time as Training Officer. One such program is being conducted by Trooper 
larles Mahoney of the Massachusetts State Police in "Leaps" Computor System (the very latest in 

iletype). This system maintains information that is very important in the field of Law Enforcement 

d the information is now only seconds away whereas it used to take hours, and sometimes days to 

t it. 

ificer John Ritchie was appointed Juvenile & Safety Officer and has done well in the short time since his 
ipointment. He has conducted a first aid program as an In-Service Program, and had a good response 
]om members of the department, both male and female. This program was under the direction of The 
:)well Red Cross, and it was conducted at Compugraphic Corporation. The employees of Compugraphic 
!)rporation took the training course also. 

jficer Joseph Cuoco was appointed Narcotics Officer, and Joe is in there "pitching" trying to get things 
ne. He has attended many drug programs and set up special groups from the department who have 
ii;ended seminars at Brandeis University and Bentley College on all subjects related to Drugs. These 
jminars are sponsored by District Attorney John Droney of Middlesex County and cover Search and 
■izure. Rules of Evidence, and Courtroom Procedure. Many of our officers have attended these classes 
id eight men and two women just graduated. 

Ijie K-9 Officers have been assigned to the Northern Middlesex Tactical Riot Squad as well as one other 
I'trolman. This is our contribution to the cause. . . . and these men will be trained in the near future in all 
:ases of Riot Control Tactics by the F. B.I. Training Unit. Wilmington is part of this program, and has 
:,en from the very first meeting of the Training Council, which is made up of twenty-two Police Depart- 
•jsnts in the greater Lowell-Lawrence area. It is a group well organized. . . .with one hundred and twenty- 
'[ e men fully equipped and fully trained in riot control. . . . and available on call for service to all 

ilpartments in the Council. 

I 

ilficer William Gable attended the Police Academy at Lowell State College for his six weeks' training in 
'irch, graduating in early April, and was secretary of the Class. Congratulations Bill! 

:! 

■Ificers Frederick Brown and Bobby Stewart, appointed in July, attended the Police Academy in September 
id were graduated in early October. Officer Stewart walked off with "Highest Honors" of the Class. 

ingratulations to both of you! Officer John Kearney, appointed to replace an officer who left us to join 
(|b Boston Police Department, could not make the date appointed for him to attend the Academy. . . . but he 
ill get in on the next class. Welcome to the "Team" all three of you! And Special thanks for being so 

;e to "select Wilmington Police Department" as your choice to serve. (These three men were non- 
i sidents when they took their exams. . . . and under the new State law, they have a right to name the depart- 
; ;nt for which they would like to work. ) 

ificer Charles Dolan attended a program in photography held in Washington for a week in October. This 
[i.s sponsored and conducted by Kodak Company. (Also F B. I. Print Refresher Course in February. ) 
tficer John Harvey attended a Drug Program in Washington for two weeks, sponsored by the National 
>)mmittee on Drugs. Officer Bernard Nally attended the F.B.I. Firearms Instructors' School inSeptember. 
I lis was for a week and was held at Camp Curtis Guild in Wakefield. Bernie is now heading up the 
(jpartment' s gun programs. Other members of the department have been attending courses at North- 
pstern University and other colleges or schools learning more about the job, and they deserve to be con- 
^atulated for their efforts. It is expected that training at the In-Service and College level will be expanded 
i' 1971. Hopefully, there will be much more to report at this time next year. 



21 



We now have two additional new telephone lines connected with the Police Department something that 

was long overdue and very necessary. The two original phones 658-3331 and 658-3332 are Only For 

Emergency Calls and can only handle Incoming Calls. The two new phones 658-5071 and 658-50"! 

are to be used when You Have To Place a Call To The Department For All Other Police Business. Please 

jot these numbers down near your phone Remember To Use 658-3331 and 658-3332 For Emergency 

Calls Only. 

And while on the subject of Calling The Police Department please let me remind you That We Operate 

Twenty-Four (24) Hours A Day Every Day Of The Year And Are Out There On Patrol In Two-Wa 

Radio-Equipped Cruisers At All Times. It must seem funny to read this! But you must believe me, whei^ 
I tell you that many times people will call us the next day to tell us "what was going on up in thei'r neck of 

the woods at midnight or early in the morning" and They Did Not Call Us Because They Didn't Want Ijt 

Bother Us At That Hour or By The Time You Would Get Here, They Would Be Gone. Please Ca'.. 

Us No Matter What The Hour Is. Maybe the Cruiser Is Just Down The Street From Where The Actio:; 

Is. 

Now for the part of this report I like best the final chapter; where I get the chance to express my mos 

sincere thanks to all the people who do so much for me and my Department throughout the year. To the j 
members of the Regular Department, the Intermittent s, the Specials, and those wonderful Traffic Super- , 

visors my grateful thanks and appreciation; to the Department Heads and all their crews for their 

contributions to the cause; to the Town Hall employees who get all our paper work processed so well; to tl 
Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager for their cooperation and their every effort during the year; an 

to all of you Thanks, so much! As we move forth into the year 1971, I look for your continued suppo i 

and cooperation. 



DISPOSITION OF CITATIONS ISSUED 1970 



Month 


Warnings 


Complaints 


Arre st 


Tota 


January 





7 





7 


February 





8 


4 


12 


March 


8 


22 


3 


33 


April 


2 


22 


2 


26 


May 


5 


58 


2 


65 


June 


2 


20 


3 


25 


July 


28 


37 





65 


August 


15 


42 


3 


60 


September 


6 


25 


3 


34 


October 


1 


9 





10 


Novembe r 


1 


10 


2 


13 


Decembe r 


1 


9 





10 


Totals 


69 


269 


22 


360 






22 







Drug Committee 



he Wilmington Drug Committee was created by vote of the Annual Town Meeting, March 1970. 

he Committee was charged with studying drug dependency and related problems within the Town and with 
reparing and implementing programs to deal with these problems. The Committee's five members were 
Dpointed in April 1970, and sixteen regular meetings were held between April and December 1970. 

nmediate goals, which were suggested at early meetings, included the creation and encouragement of 
iucational programs for both students and adults, and the availability of medical and rehabilitative fa- 
lities for those already affected. 

uring the period covered by this report, members of the Drug Committee visited, conversed with, or 
:herwise contacted the following: addicts in prison; rehabilitation programs; other community drug com- 
uttees; representatives of medical and pharmaceutical groups; law enforcement personnel; recreational 
ithorities; publishers of educational materials; and people of all descriptions, those who were drug 
spendent and those who were not. 

hile investigating rehabilitation programs, it became obvious that Wilmington had neither the economic 
ssources nor the personnel necessary to conduct a comprehensive program. During this period, a pro- 
Dsed regional program, called SHARE, came to the attention of the committee. This program was to 
iclude, as participants, the several communities in the greater Lowell Mental Health Area, including 

ilmington. After much consideration, it was agreed that the committee recommend that the Town join 
lis program. 

Board of Directors was created for the purpose of accepting and administering funds, and included one 
lember each from the Board of Selectmen and the Drug Committee in each of the member communities, 
ir. Bruce MacDonald, of the Board of Selectmen, and Mr. Lester White, of the Drug Committee, were 
lected in Wilmington. 

n article appeared in the warrant for the Special Town Meeting called in November asking for funds to 
Llow Wilmington to participate in SHARE for a period of one year, and was voted in the affirmative. 

Iso, The Drug Committee has been pleased this year to cooperate closely with the Wilmington School 
epartment, where encouraging progress is being made in the educational area. 

six-weeks program in Adult Drug Education was begun in November and may be repeated in the future. 

'he Drug Committee, during this year, has regretfully accepted the resignations of Mr. Joseph Beaton, Jr. , 
irs. Clare Cabral and Mr. Robert Cripps. 



23 



Cemetery Department 



Burials in 1970: 

Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elsewhere 

Non-residents 

Babie s 

Transfer 

C remation 



Re serve: 



Receipts: 



Sale of Lots 
Refund on Two Lots 
Total Reserve 



12 
48 
36 
11 
2 

1^ 

110 



$4, 575 
110 
$4, 465 



Interments 
Liners Sold 

Foundations for Monuments 
Setting Markers 
Affidavit 
Removal 



Perpetual Care: 

Total Trust Fund 



$4, 143. OC 
662. OC 
611. OC 
70. OC 
2. OC 
20, OC 



$5, 508. OC' 



$ 150. OC 



The Department was plagued this year by a lack of help. One man left the employ of the Town, and two 
others were out due to sickness. High School and College boys were employed during school vacations an( 
during the summer. 

Fertilizer was spread over most of the grass area that we maintain. We were kept busy throughout the yei 
with the usual mowing and trimming of grass. All of the large spruce trees were pruned and the dead brus 
removed. About one hundred feet of water line had to be replaced due to freezing. We were aided in this 
project by members of the Water Department. Aluminum lot markers and numbers are now being used to 
replace the old type cement ones. The aluminum ones should be easier to find when the groiind is frozen. 

The eight year old tractor was in the repair shop a number of weeks with broken axles and a broken 
camshaft. A new two and one -half ton Chevrolet Truck was purchased, and a new snow plow was mounted 
on it. This replaced the 1955 ton and one-half International. This vehicle, and our three and one-half toi 
Ford, were utilized by the Highway Department for snow removal. 

The use of ready grown sod was a new venture for the department this year. It was used to grass over the* 
winter graves and some of the bare spots. The Veteran's Park at Glen Road and Middlesex Avenue, was 
the recipient of a new lawn in just one day, with the use of this type of sod. A four acre area was cleared) 
of trees and brush to make way for expansion. This work was done by the Tree and Cemetery Departmeni 
The logs were milled, and the lumber will be used by the Maintenance Department, A contractor will be 
hired to grade the area. Three hundred feet of green vinyl fence was installed at the south end of the 
Cemetery. It will serve as a background for a planting of shrubs or evergreens. 



Two large skating areas at Silver Lake were cleared and maintained throughout the winter months, 
beaches were cleaned and kept in shape throughout the summer. 



Both 



ti 



Gravel was hauled by the Cemetery and Highway Departments for the road and parking lot at the Town Par | 
The area and the roadway were then hot-topped. Constant use of the Town Park for softball, outings. 
Crusader practice sessions, football, skiing, etc. , necessitated the continual employ of men and equipmei 



24 




Dur plaques on the Veteran's Parks were removed, refinished and replaced. This is the first time to our 
lowledge that this has been done since their installation. Water outlets were installed at the small parks 
' facilitate watering the grass in these areas. The dome on the Flag Pole at the Common was repaired 
id painted by Mr. William Traer of Woburn Street, at no cost to the Town. The pole was originally in- 
alled by Mr. Traer two years ago. 

e wish to extend our thanks to all of the Town Officials and employees who assisted in the operation of the 
emetery Department this year. 



Fire Department 



he manual force consists of the Chief, four Lieutenants, and twenty-four Privates. There is a call force 
1 thirteen members. The department responded to a total of one thousand one hundred and six (1106) calls. 



Residential Buildings 61 

Commercial Buildings 2 

Vehicles 63 

Brush, grass, or rubbish 272 



Out of Town assistance 4 

False Alarms 63 

Rescue or Emerg. Amb. 478 

Service Calls 163 



otal value of property endangered was 
otal property loss was 

ermits issued for blasting 

ermits issued for storage of propane gas & oil 



,1, 878, 150 
81,248 

18 
36 



ispections were made of all schools, public buildings and all inflammable storage as required by law. 

he Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Lieutenant Cushing, made inspections of all business 
Btablishments in town. Several local industries were assisted in the organization and training of indus- 
ial fire brigades. The Junior Fire Marshal Plan was conducted in all of the 5th grades, and Fire 
revention lectures were given in all of the schools. 

he department had twenty-seven bomb scares called in by telephone. Men and equipment had to be dis- 
itched, and all buildings were evacuated of personnel until a complete search was made. Two schools 
ere damaged by moletov cocktails. 

he Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Private Blaisdell, made all necessary repairs to the fire 
Larm system, one hiindred and forty-two change overs for the light and telephone companies and strung 
pproximately four miles of wire. Two new boxes were added to the system: Barbo's and Ling. 



ill eqxiipment is in good condition with the exception of Engine #3. 



25 



Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as sweeping streets, 
patching streets, cleaning catch basins, erection of street signs, scrapping back roads, replacing broken 
curbing, replacing guard rails, etc. 



Sidewalk Program: This year we built new sidewalks on Clark Street from Middlesex Avenue to Main Strei 
also Adams Street from the High School to Chandler Road. Also we repaved sections of Church Street anc ^ 
Burlington Avenue. 



Chapter 90 Maintenance: The monies were spent for hot top on Shawsheen Avenue and a section of 
Burlington Avenue. 

Chapter 768: The monies were spent mostly for hot topping Burlington Avenue, Shawsheen Avenue and 
Clark Street. 

Chapter 81 Maintenance: About 16 miles of streets were resurfaced, all or in part. Streets included wer 
Cypress Street, Brattle Street, Veranda Avenue, Wildwood Street, Federal Street, North Street, Glen Ro 
Boutwell Street, Harris Street, Cedar Street, Eames Street, Chestnut Street, High Street, Andover Stree 
Woburn Street, Lawrence Street, Emerson Road, Lake Street, Wiser Street, Hobson Avenue, Pine Avenu 
Canal Street, Corey Avenue, Grand Street, Glendale Circle, Burt Road, Swain Road, Butters Row, Adam 
Street, Carolyn Road and Hathaway Road. 

Hot Top Program: New this year under Expense Account: we hot topped Ballardvale Street and Middle se: 
Avenue. 



li 



Drainage: We eliminated the following drainage problems this year. Replaced the culvert on Middlesex 
Avenue; replaced the culvert on Washington Avenue; replaced the culvert on Clark Street; replaced the 
culvert on Glen Road; installed new culvert on Magazine Street; installed drainage system from ClarkStrei 
to Adelaide Street; installed drainage system on Laurel Avenue; installed drainage system on Glendale 
Circle; built catch basins on Cunningham Street and Shaw sheen Avenue . 



Ferguson Road was completed under the Betterment Act. ' 

Clean-up, Pick-up Campaign: The annual clean-up, pick-up campaign was conducted from May 4th through 
May 8th. We received over 650 calls for pick-up. Approximately 350 truck loads were taken to the Town 
dump. The loader had to be used for many of the calls, as they were either too heavy or too large for the 
men to pick up and load on the trucks. Due to the large number of calls received, it took the Highway 
Department 13 days to complete every call that came in by May 8th. 



Roadside Pick-up: A new project this year; picking up trash and debris discarded along the roadside, spoi 
sored by the Chamber of Commerce and students. The Highway Department assisted by hauling approx- 
imately 15 loads to the Town dump. 



)rk Performed For Other Departments: Tree Dept: During the months of January, February and March, 
spent 576 man hours helping to remove, load and haul away trees from various parts of the Town. 



lintenance Department: Welder worked on various buildings during the year. Swept all school yards, 
ader worked on field behind High School, helped with the construction of the tennis courts at the 
awsheen Avenue School, helped with the construction of the parking lot at the Town Hall Annex. 

metery Department: Helped grade and hot top Town Park Road. 

iter Department: Helped patch water trenches on Belmont Avenue. Helped for a few days on West Street 
c new water mains. 

ow & Ice: Snow and ice removal still remains a major and very expensive problem. The month of 



cember 1970 was one of our most expensive months on record due to a record snowfall. 

[uipment: The mechanic, foreman and I have checked over the equipment and sincerely conclude we must 



ide the following: front end loader with backhoe; 1 pick-up truck; 1 dump truck; and the sidewalk bulldozer, 
lis year we added a new man to our crew per vote of the Annual Town Meeting. 

concluding this report, I would like to thank all the Town Departments for the cooperation extended this 
[partment in 1970, especially their cooperation during the snow storms. To the Town Manager and the 
lard of Selectmen for their support throughout the year, and to the men of the Highway Department for 
sir efforts in the accomplishments of the Highway Department in 1970, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



Recreation Commission 



irmg the past year, the employment of a full-time Director to operate and organize expanding programs 
LS accomplished. This action put Wilmington on a basis to develop community recreation programs for 
L ages and interests. In addition to the programs already in existence, these past few months have seen 
2 development of a Theater group, the beginning of a Teen program and Drop-In Center, classes for 
ildren and adults, expanded use of school facilities, and various special activities. 

ivelopment needs for the future are more diverse programs, especially for the girls, as well as a youth 
nter, and small neighborhood parks to complement the school sites for community enjoyment. 

le Commission, through the Director, is anxious to serve the needs of the citizens and welcomes all 
ggestions and inquiries. The Commission would like to thank all the volunteers who gave of their time 

insure the success of the programs, and offers special thanks to Mr. Lawrence Cushing for his service 

the Town, as the Recreation Director. 



Z7 



Tree Department 



Throughout the year our regular tree work of cutting, trimming and removing trees was carried out. Ou 
tree planting program started in April. 130 Norway maples were purchased under this program, and 
planted for those requesting them. Tree feeding was done again this year. Between dead, damaged, dis- 
eased trees, and also due to road widening, 201 trees were removed. Tree spraying begins in April for 
control of various insects. Assisted in taking down trees for new cemetery project. Assisted other depai 
ments when requested. Plowed snow for Highway Department during storms. Assisted Conservation 
Department in setting out trees for Arbor Day. Trimmed fire alarms. 

Elm Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease: 

Fifty samples from various trees were sent to Amherst State College to be tested for Dutch Elm. Of the s 
fifty samples, 48 came back diseased. Stumps were removed using the Tree Department's stump cutter. 

Moth Department: 

We sprayed for the control of insects such as tent caterpillars, gypsy moth, white pine weevil, European 
pine, shoot moth, maple bladder gall, spruce gall aphids, fall web worms and oak skeletonize r. This la- 
mentioned pest, although being harmless, has caused considerable concern. Spraying was carried on 
throughout the entire town. The effects of the spray seems to have controlled them considerably. A new 
insect that appeared this year was the Locust Leaf Beetle. Upon request, 59 hornets and bees' nests war 
removed. 

Poison Ivy: 

Roadside areas were sprayed with weed killer where poison ivy was found. Hazardous corners and road- 
side brush were also sprayed to control growth. 

Mosquitoe s: 

The Larvaecide Control Program was doubled this year. All trapped water and bogs holes were treated 
with liquid larvaecide. This larvaecide is harmless to fish, animals and vegetation. The Tree Departmc 
ment's fog generator was very effective again this year in the control of mosquitoes. The generator was 
mounted on the new 4-wheel drive pick-up truck which made it much easier to get into small wooded areas 
dead end streets, and along old railroad beds that are surrounded by swamps. This operation has to be 
carried on in the evening between eight and twelve o'clock when the greatest number of mosquitoes are ou 

In concluding this report, I would like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their 
support throughout the year, all the Town departments for the cooperation given this department in 1970, 
and to the men of the Tree department for their complete cooperation and efforts for the year 1970, I 
extend my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



28 



Veterans^ Agent 



terans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 115, with strict compliance 
this chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. 

nefits are for the needy veteran and his immediate family who have been subjected to unforeseen needs. 
Qal approval of benefits comes from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts, 
e appropriation for 1970 was $70, 000 as voted at the annual Town Meeting. The Department request was 
r $97, 500. 

ital expended for aid to Veterans and their families was $77, 719. 94. Transferred at the November 21, 
70 Town Meeting was $15,099. 10, to meet requirements due to unemployment and increase in costs of 
;dical benefits. Money encumbered by Agent, to meet payment of bills after authorization from 
■mmissioner's Office, was $7, 820. 76, of which $856. 40 has been authorized and paid. Total reimburse- 
jnts from settled assignments on accident cases, authorized by the Commissioner's Office, was 
,493. 50. One case on assignment, reimbursed to Town, $660.42 (no State participation - rejected after 
ig deliberation by Commissioner's Office). Agent managed to collect full reimbursement. Of the amount 
thorized by Commissioner's Office, because 50% is shared by the Town, the Town's share on assignment 
ses is $746. 75, plus the $660. 42 which Agent collected in full. 

le total amount of $2, 153. 92 has been turned over to the Town Treasurer, and the Commonwealth has been 
tified so adjustment of any monies can be made before State reimbursement to the Town. 

-se load varies from time to time and has increased over previous years by about one-third. The work 
id of this department continues to increase with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to 
cial Security and Education. The returning Vietnam Veterans add a large amount of paper work to the 
er increasing work load. Unemployment due to strikes, shut downs and lack of work has had an impact 
expenditure s . 

her than financial, this department aids the veteran in many areas, such as: Transportation to V. A. 
)spitals. Clinics, and Social Security Offices; Applications and Reports for various V. A. benefits; and 
recting the veteran to the proper channels. 

Voted at Annual Town Meeting . . . .$70, 000. 00 

Transferred at Special Town Meeting .... 15, 099. 10 

85, 099. 10 

Total Aid Expended in 1970 $77, 7 19. 94 



29 



Building Inspector 



Building Permits were issued as follows: 



Dwellings (single family) 

Residential Garages 

Add. & Alter, (residential) 



TOTAL 



Industrial Buildings 

Commercial Buildings (stores) 

Commercial Garages 

Add. & Alter, (non- re sidential) 

Swimming Pools and Signs 

Service Stations 

Utility Buildings 



Schools 



TOTAL 



TOTAL 



No. 

131 
ZO 
64 



12 

3 

6 
43 



1968 
Valuation 

$ 2, 010, 500 
52, 500 
145, 900 

$ 2, Z08, 900 

$ 6, 517, 000 
128, 000 

336, 000 
106, 650 



7, 087, 650 
1, 300, 000 



No. 

66 
26 
72 



14 
1 

13 
31 



1969 
Valuation 

$ 1,075,000 
87, 900 
160, 650 

$ 1,323,550 

$ 4, 387, 790 
60, 000 

739, 000 
59, 325 



5, 246, 115 



No. 

56 
11 
76 



5 
1 
2 
14 
36 
1 
1 



1970 
Valuatior 



1, 045, OC 
33, OC 
204, IC 



$ 1, 282, IC 

$ 721, OC 
50, OC 
43, OC 
1, 633, 20 
77, 15 
50, OC 
10, OC 

$ 2, 584, 35 



$10, 596, 550 



$ 6, 569, 665 



$ 3, 866, 45 



Renewals 
Demolitions 

Fire Damage & Repairs 
Foundations 



TOTAL 



27 
14 
5 
4 

33T 



Report of Fees Received and Turned Over to The Treasurer: 



Building Permits 
Gas Fitting Permits 
Wiring Permits 



331 $10,399.00 
116 808.50 
282 2,255.75 



21 
15 
1 



268 



268 $ 6, 979. 79 
102 770. 50 

309 2,633.50 



22 
9 
2 
5 

241 



241 
76 
311 



4, 250. 00 
602. 00 
2, 472. 955 



TOTAL 729 $13,463.25 



679 $10,383.79 



628 $ 7, 324. 95 



30 



le emphasis in 1970 was on remodeling and additions to existing dwellings rather than building new homes. 
18 continued uneasy economic situation is likely the reason. 

le program to eliminate substandard structures has been successful particularly in the latter part of the 
ar. The new fee system, voted at the Special Town Meeting and effective in 1971, should make the 
lilding Inspector's office self sufficient. Administration of the Zoning By-Law continues to take a great 
al of time. Court action has been taken in the more difficult cases. 

le Building Inspector has attended seminars and conferences during 1970 in an attempt to keep abreast of 
2 latest developments in code administration, in order to better serve Wilmington. 

y thanks to all of those who have provided assistance to my department during 1970. 



Public Buildings Dept. 



le department assumed the maintenance of the new Shawsheen School on September 9, 1970. Three new 
stodians are assigned to this building which has twenty-seven classrooms, a gymnasium, cafeteria and 
rious specialty areas plus twenty acres of field and parking areas to maintain. 

complete remodeling of the former Library was completed by this department creating offices for the 
lilding Inspector, Sanitarian, Public Health Nurse and a clerk. The building was named Town Hall Annex. 
)tal cost of remodeling including the parking area was $6, 595. 94. 

le department completed an addition to the Highway Garage adding approximately 6, 000 square feet to the 
ilding at a cost of $5. 50 per square foot. We are in the process of changing over the entire heating 
stem to a more efficient and economical type. A new boiler is on order, and all piping has been com- 
eted to do away with the two hot air units that were installed in the original construction. 

;w lighting has been installed to illuminate the yard area of the Police Station, and wire aluminum grilles 
ixe placed over the windows to prevent a possible fire bombing of the station. 

instruction of the new tennis courts at the Shawsheen School is 75% completed. Early in the Spring the 
iiish coat of hot top and fencing will be done. Construction of the new courts for the Glen Road School 
.11 commence in the Spring of 1971. 

mdalism was very excessive in the year 1970. There were three attempted arsons at the Buzzell School, 
e at the Glen Road, two at the High School, five at the West Intermediate and one fire at the West Inter- 
ediate causing $4, 000 damage to the building. Many windows were broken, and ten breaks and entries 
;re recorded at various buildings. Time lost with insurance investigation and court appearances, due to 
is vandalism, creates additional problems for the department. 

iroughout the year the department has carried on the continuous work of maintaining the plant facilities 
-d grounds of all Town-owned buildings. 

1 conclusion, on behalf of the department, I would like to thank the other Town Departments and the Town 
ficials for their cooperation. I also wish to express my thanks to the Public Buildings Department 
nployees for a job well done in the year 1970. 



31 



Water & Sewer Department 



Your Water and Sewer Commissioners submit for perusal the following statistical data and information 
relative to the operation of this department: 



WATER SUPPLY : 

Maximum Gallons 
Pumped per Day- 
Maximum Gallons 
Pumped per Week 

Maximum Gallons 
Pumped per Month 

Average Gallons 
Pumped per Day- 
Average Gallons 
Pumped per Month 

Total Gallons 
Pumped per Year 



1966 
3, 973, 400 

25, 085, 300 

104, 655, 200 

2, 592, 550 

78, 856, 000 



946, 281, 000 
MISCELLANANEOUS INFORMATION: 



1967 
4, 348, 500 

23, 520, 700 

98, 027, 200 

2, 714, 234 

82, 575, 000 

990, 909, 900 



1968 
3, 853, 200 

19, 938, 400 

83, 369, 800 

2, 348, 000 

71, 419, 125 

857, 029, 500 



1969 
5, 117, 000 

27, 125, 000 

95, 320, 000 

2, 530, 300 

76, 963, 675 

923, 564, 100 



197 
4, 747, 

25, 712, 

95, 302, 

2, 583, 

78, 549, 

942, 598, 



New Services Installed 
Total Active Services 



63 
4, 262 



New Meters Installed 63 
New Hydrants Installed 1 



Approximately three and one-half miles of water mains were installed in 1970 as part of a total developrr 
to provide improved water service for the Town of Wilmington. This new pipe has been flushed, tested a 
accepted by the State Board of Health. As part of this developmental program, a new pumping station ha 
been erected off Salem Street in North Wilmington. With the arrival and installation of pumping equipme 
and ancillary machinery, the plant will become fully operational. 

New Connecting Mains Laid in 1970: 



Railroad Bed (to Salem Street Pumping Station) 


1, 000 


Salem Street (Including under Route #93) 


6, 000 


Cunningham Street 


1, 500 


Beeching Avenue 


500 


Faulkner Avenue 


1, 800 


Glen Road 


500 


Main Street 


500 


Grove Avenue 


1, 280 


Phillips Avenue 


1, 000 


Wild Avenue 


320 


Baker Street 


500 


Brand Avenue 


1, 500 



32 



combination of vandalism, trespass and concern for public safety led to the erection of a security fence 
ound the newly built pumping station as well as around much of the perimeter of the new well field itself, 
-ior to constructing the fence, a survey was undertaken to firmly establish the boundaries at this site, 
irther preciseness was insured by the setting of concrete bounds at strategic locations as determined by 
2 surveyor, Robert E. Anderson Company. (Cost $2, 800. ) 

planned program of water main flushing was embarked upon during the past year to alleviate a dirty water 
oblem which had become evident. The spring and fall seasons have produced a significant number of 
mplaints. Periods of peak demand as well seem to correlate with the number of dirty water complaints, 
ould this program of periodic and systematic flushing not eliminate or markedly deter this problem, other 
d more costly steps will then be considered; e. g. mechanically cleaning and perhaps simultaneously lining 
5 older water mains, and replacing old mains with new and larger pipe to accommodate increased demand. 

[iter analysis reports during the year revealed that the Butters Row well field had a high iron count. 

nee at the time the department was receiving inordinate numbers of complaints concerning rusty water, 
' mping at this site was temporarily suspended. A project involving the installation of injection wells was 

imediately undertaken. At a cost of approximately $6, 000 the high iron content was reduced to within 

ceptable limits, and operations at the Butters Row station have been restored. 

t 

iring 1970 water rates were reluctantly increased. Increased expenditures, both immediate and projected, 
cessitated a twenty-five percent increase in water consumption rates. In addition, fire protection rates 
lire established and put into effect. 

orking within the limitations imposed by available funds and personnel, a number of projects will receive 
I tention during the following years: 

(1) Standpipe Maintenance 

I Painting and refurbishing the Hillside Way Standpipe (Estimated Cost - $30, 000. ). 

(2) Street Main Renovations 

I Replacing 1/4" Water Main on Linda Road (Estimated Cost - $6, 000. ). 

(3) Well Field Maintenance 

Constructing Permanent Pumping Station at Town Park Well Field (Estimated Cost - $9, 000. ). 
Installing Flow Meter at the Town Park Station (Estimated Cost - $600. ). 
Installing Chemical Feeders at all Stations (Estimated Cost - $5, 000. ). 

1 is hoped that expected income will permit all of the above to receive attention as well as others that are 
' ing considered. However, shoiild anticipated revenues fall below expectations or should emergencies 
" ise, your Board of Commissioners would reassess the priority list. 

:WER SYSTEM: 



our new sewer connections were made in 1970 bringing the total active sewer services to thirty. 

lans for the first step in the construction of the Silver Lake Sewer Interceptor have been progressing 
ider the guidance and leadership of the Town Manager. Aberjona River pollution, commensurate in- 
■eased industrial growth, along with an increasing population have all contributed to the necessity for this 
I'oject. Combined State and Federal funds, amounting to $262, 500 have been awarded thus far for this 
•oject, with the possibiltiy of another 10% forthcoming. 



Board of Health 



Board of Health 
Mr. Joseph Paglia, Cha: 
Mrs. Marion Boylen 
Mr. James Durkee 



irman 



Ernest F. Romano, M, S. P. H. , R. S. Director 

Anne Butters, R. N. , Public Health Nurse 

Eleanor Hovey, Dental Hygienist 

Abbie McQuaid, R. N. , Public Health Nurse 

Gerald Fagan, M. D. , Public Health Physician 

Simon Cutter, Legal Adviser 

William Harrison, Plumbing Inspector 

Joseph Balestrieri, Inspector of Animals 



Personnel 



There were no essential changes in personnel during 1970. Mr. Joseph Paglia was elected chairman of the; 
Board. The Board was notified that State Department of Health personnel have now assumed the respon- j 
sibility of Slaughtering Inspectors. This was a function formerly assumed by local Boards of Health. 

During 1970, the Board provided services which ranged from air pollution to investigation of nuisance 
complaints. The Board, as an extra curricula activity, also initiated a Drug Abuse Program in Town and 
participated in meetings throughout the year. 

The State Department of Health promulgated some new legislation that effected the Board in the area of air 
pollution and immunization of dogs for rabies. 

Regionalization of local Boards of Health through proposed legislation was a matter of great concern to the 
Board. Meetings were attended to discuss this and its implication to Wilmington. 

The Board accelerated its pace in dealing with air pollution problems. Town Counsel became involved at 
the request of the Selectmen, and many meetings were held with all concerned. 

The Board discontinued its afternoon session for the monthly immunization program due to poor attendance. 
German measles vaccine was made available by the State Health Department and was given to those 
requesting, and giving consent, in grades 1-6, and in the day care centers. 

Only one person was hospitalized during the year for tuberculosis, attesting to the effectiveness of control 
programs. 

A. Communicable Disease Control 



1 



Monthly Immunization Clinic 

The afternoon session was discontinued in September. 



Attendance 



1969 
469 



1970 
452 



2 



German Measles Program: 



German Measles was added to the list of vaccines made available routinely at the monthly 
clinic . 



Doses given grades 1-6 2,214 
Doses given pre-school 148 



34 



A. Communicable Disease Control (continued) 



3. Anti- Rabies Clinic: 

A new state law made it mandatory that all dogs be immunized for rabies on a two-year basis. 



Smallpox Clinic: 



Dogs Immunized 



Attendance 



1969 
609 



56 



1970 
1, 002 



52 



Tuberculosis Control: 



Deaths Reported 
Home Visits 

Visits to Lowell Health Department 
Visits to Hospital 
Hospitalized during 1970 
Hospital Costs for 1970 



Tine Test for Tuberculosis in Schools; 



Children Tested in Grades 1 and 9 

(All were negative) 
Personnel Tested 

Positive to Test 



2 
67 
3 
8 
1 

$1, 282. 51 



641 

78 
4 



B. Public Health Nursing 
1. Premature Births: 



2. Day Care Centers: 

3. Morbidity Service: 

4. General Health Visits: 

5. Newborn Infants: 

C. Dental Report 



Number Reported 

Deaths 

Home Visits 

Hospitalization Costs for 1970 



Visits to Centers 



Nursing Visits 
Fees Collected 



Home Visits 

Reimbursements for Visits 



Children Serviced in School 

Home Visits by Public Health Nurses 

Cost of Dental Supplies 



13 

3 
20 




28 



841 
$520. 00 

273 



274 
$840. 00 



1, 026 

36 

$328. 92 



35 



Environmental Health 

1. Plumbing: 

2. Licenses and Permits: 



3. Sewage Disposal Sanitation: 



Permits Issued 


1 10 


Fees Collected , 


$972. 00 


Sewerage 


127 


Food 


81 


Milk (vehicle) 


62 


Milk (store) 


17 


Recreational Camps 


2 


Day Care Centers 


3 


Piggeries 


6 


Fiineral Directors 


3 


Ice Cream Manufacturing 


3 


Refuse Transportation 


19 


Stable 


21 


Installer's 


14 


Fees Totaled 


$2, 583. 20 


ssued as follows in 1970: 




Existing Dwellings 


62 


New Dwellings 


58 


Comme rcial 


4 


Industrial 


3 



Inspections and Investigations 

All septic tank systems for town buildings were checked by the Board 
to determine the need for pumping. 



400 



Milk Sanitation: 



Dairies Licensed 

Stores Licensed to Sell Milk 

Dairies Inspected 

Samples Collected for Analysis 

One foreign object fo\and in milk was 

submitted for analysis 



17 
55 
1 
2 



5. Dump Operation: 



The cost for the operation of the dump remained at $24, 000 for the period 1970-1971. This i: 
the third year the cost remained the same. However, it is anticipated there will be a sharp 
increase in cost due to the new air pollution laws and the impending new solid waste disposal 
regulations proposed by the State Department of Public Health. A form was prepared by the 
Board for distribution at the dump explaining some pertinent parts of the dump contract. 

Garbage Disposal: 

The cost for garbage collection for the period May 1, 1970 to April 30, 1971 was $24, 500. 
This represented an increase of $2, 000. 00 over the previous year. The Board prepared and 
distributed a form showing a proposed location for garbage containers together with some 
regulations on collection. 



D. 



Environmental Health (continued) 



7. Food Sanitation: 

Permits are required for the operation of all food facilities in Town. This includes retail food 
establishments, restaurants, mobile canteens, school and industrial cafeterias, as well as 
church functions, food served at carnivals, horse shows, and country clubs. 81 Food permits 
were issued. 

The Board enforces the requirements of Article X of the Massachusetts Sanitary Code and 
other pertinent State and Local regulations. 

By agreement with the Board of Selectmen, no common victualler's license is issued by them 
until an inspection and favorable report is submitted by the Board of Health. The Board of 
Health reviews all plans for new food facilities before issuance of permits, 

8. Subdivisions: 

The Board continues to enforce those rules and regulations enacted by them in 1967. These 
require the submission of applications, fees and results of a sanitary survey of the land in 
question by the proponent prior to approval. Each lot is tested within the subdivision to 
determine soil conditions, water table and percolation tests. Those lots that do not meet 
standards are disapproved and are recorded as such in the registry of deeds. The Board 
processed five subdivisions involving 89 lots of land. 

9. International Certificates: 

Persons traveling overseas are required to have their record of vaccinations certified by the 
Board of Health. This service is provided for anyone requesting it. 107 were certified. 

10. Legal Matters: 

The Board emerged successfully in a case brought against it in supreme court by the Glen 
Avenue Realty Corporation. The court dismissed a petition for a writ of mandamus. The 
Board of Health refused to issue sewerage permits for two lots of land. The court upheld 
this position. 

Mr. Simon Cutter represented the Board at the Woburn District Court on matters dealing 
with illegal dumping, sewerage problems, illegal use of animals, refuse disposal and the 
illegal use of a privy. Mr. Alan Altman, Town Counsel represented the Board on two matters 
in court and advised them on many others. 

11. Complaints: 

The Board received a total of 521 complaints. Garbage complaints accounted for the majority 
of these. Investigations were made involving complaints of garbage, rubbish, sewerage 
overflow, rodents, odors, noise, laundry waste, smoke, and nuisances. One odor complaint 
involved a local industry in which eight men complained of dizziness. A faulty heating unit, 
emitting poisonous gases, proved to be the cause of the complaint. 

12. Air Pollution: 

The State Health Department enacted what are considered the most stringent air pollution 
regulations in the country. The Board of Health together with the State Health Department 
took immediate steps to enforce these regulations. Hearings were held in Boston with 
representatives of two local industries, the State Health Department, and the local Board on 
odor complaints. These were followed up with numerous investigations and a meeting with 
the Board of Selectmen, Town Counsel, and representatives of three industries to deal with 
the odor problem. 



37 



12. Air Pollution: (continued) 

As a result of their efforts, one industry has completely solved its problem by discontinuing 
the use of those chemicals emitting odors. One industry hired a consultant, considered the 
foremost authority in Massachusetts on air pollution. They are in the process of imple- 
menting his recommendations. The third industry contributing to the odor problem has 
purchased and installed control equipment. They are in the process of studying the effect- 
iveness of this equipment. 

The Board also participated in a task force for the State to help develop basic health standar 
in the field of air pollution. 

13. Rec reation Area Sanitation: 

During the bathing period, swimming water samples were collected at regular intervals and 
tested. These all complied with standards. Inspections were also made of the two 
recreation areas in town and both were licensed. Water samples were collected and sub- 
mitted for analysis. 



14. Inspector of Animals: 

Animals Quarantined for Bites 80 

Animals Released from Quarantine 80 

Animals Disposed of 3 65 

Animals Submitted to Lab. for Examination 2 

Animals Showing Signs of Rabies 

Premises Keeping Domestic Animals Inspected 58 



15. Meetings: 

The Board met regularly during the course of the year to act on matters brought before ther 
They met with the Town Manager, Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, and other 
department heads to deal with town matters. The Board attended and participated actively at 
regular meetings of the North East Association Boards of Health. Mr. James Durkee is 
Vice President of that organization. Board personnel attended conferences and periodic 
meetings during the course of the year. 

The Board would like to express its thanks to Father Croke for the use of Villanova Hall for the monthly 
immunization clinics, and Chief Boudreau and his people for their assistance and use of the fire station 
for the dog clinic; also members of the School Health Department for their cooperation in those programs 
that required the joint endeavor of both departments. 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 1667 

Dogs Confined 167 

Complaints Covered 2034 

Court Complaints 294 

Court Fines Paid $631 

Dogs Disposed Of 209 

Dogs Killed By Cars 80 

Resident Calls For Licenses 639 

Kennels - $50. 00 1 

25. 00 3 



38 



Library Trustees 



past year has been an exceptionally active one for the library, not only in appointments to its profes- 
al staff and use of library materials, but in becoming more flexible and more imaginative by reaching 
and involving all citizens, young and old alike, by improving and extending its services and educational 
jrtunitie s . 

Board was pleased to announce the appointment of Jeremy Slinn as Director. Mr. Slinn came to us via 
United Kingdom and is a graduate of Sheffield College and North West Polytechnic Library School in 
don. Since coming to the United States, Mr. Slinn served as senior assistant librarian in the reference 
irtment of the Brookline Public Library and as reference librarian at the Newton College of the Sacred 
rt. 

reciation is expressed also to Mrs. Clara Chipman who was kind enough to allow herself to be recalled 
aty and performed an immeasurable service for the library during her tenure as acting librarian. 

first appointment of a professional Children's Librarian, Mrs. Penelope Bornstein, has enabled the 
iiry to be introduced to an ever-increasing number of younger patrons. Several new programs have 

1 instituted and existing services in this area expanded. Mrs. Bornstein is a graduate of the University 
:Laine, received her Masters of Library Science' degree at Simmons College and was a recipient of the 

□line H. Hewins scholarship. 

n effort to expand our professional staff, Mrs. Penny Dettmer has been appointed part-time reference 
stant. Mrs. Dettmer will complete her studies for a Masters in Library Science at Simmons College 
year. Mr. E. Hayward Bliss was appointed to fill the vacancy on the Board of Trustees. 

1 QOwledgment is gratefully made to the Wilmington Women's Club for their outstanding support in the way 
ifts and services rendered. The donation of a fine exhibit case has recently enabled the library to 
lay a collection of Indian artifacts. The landscaping of the library has been tastefully enhanced with the 
tion of flowering shrubs and trees, also gifts of the Women's Club. Most recently, the Club has 
srously donated a prize -winning watercolor painting, placed on display in the main reading room, de- 
Lng the Charles River and ever-changing Boston skyline. We are most grateful for their continued 
sort. 

Trustees wish to thank Mr. Slinn and members of the library staff for leadership and sure direction 
for providing library service of consistently high quality; and appreciation to its patrons who have 
dcipated in its new progress. The library looks forward to their continued support as new opportunities 
service unfold in the year ahead. 



39 



Librarian 



Books added to Library- 
Recordings added 
Books circulated 
Periodicals circulated 
Recordings circulated 
Fines collected 



4, 595 
74 

94, 623") 

1,42a) ' 
$1, 649. 64 



The book circulation figure represents a healthy increase over the 1969 total. 

As deposit collections in several elementary schools are no longer included in our totals, the increase i 
books circulated from the Memorial Library is 8,290 more than last year. This is a satisfactory incre; 
particularly as we were able to purchase fewer books during 1970 than were purchased during 1969 owin 
to the increase in the cost of books. 

The periodical collection received very heavy use during the year both for recreational and study purpoS' 
Circulation from the expanded periodical collection increased 100% over last year. Use of the periodica 
was aided by the purchase of additional periodical indexes, and the extension of files through microfilm. 
The transfer of back files of some of the bulkier journals onto microfilm also has helped to conserve the 
limited reserve stack area for less frequently used books. 

The record collection continued to be extremely popular, circulation has tripled over the previous year, 
although many of the older records are now worn out and will have to be replaced during the coining yea 
A new classification system was adopted for the records which has made them more accessible. A num 
of tape cassettes have been added to the collection this year and more material in this format will proba^ 
be purchased in the future. 

The reserve book system was reorganized during the year in order to give better control of requests foi 
specific items. Since the new system was introduced the staff dealt with about 2,000 requests for speci] 
books, over 90% of which were satisfied. However some requests, particularly those for books on the Ii 
sellers lists took longer to satisfy than we should have liked. Best sellers usually attract from three to 
five dozen reserves, but as we can purchase only a limited number of copies, patrons have had to wait 
much longer for these books. 

In order to supplement on our collection, heavy use was made of the Interlibrary Loan system. Most ofi 
these books came from Lowell City Library or Boston Public Library via the Eastern Regional Public 
Library System. Books were also obtained for patrons from library of, amongst others, Boston Colleg< 
Harvard University, the Countway Library, Wentworth Institute, Wheelock College, and Newton College? 
the Sacred Heart. 

A start was made in formation of a local history collection of Wilmington materials. We hope to acquire 
copies of all publications relating to the Town's history, government and development. We now receive' 
copies of all publications issued by the various town departments so that information on town governmena 



40 



Lvities is readily available. Our file of the 'Town Crier' is almost complete, but some back issues have 
yet been acquired. We hope that interested citizens who might come across any documents, reports or 
2r publications relating to the history of the Town might consider donating them to the Library. We are 
y grateful to Mr. Larz Neilson, Mr. Clayton Buck, and Mr. James D. Blake for the gifts of Indian 
ifacts that were found in Wilmington. 

-ing the year an electrostatic copier was acquired for public use. Copies are available for 10 cents 

h, and the machine proved to be very useful both for students and local businessmen. More than 9, 000 

ies were made by patrons during the eight months since we acquired the copier. 

! Conference Room has been used regularly by local societies and organizations for their meetings. The 
Idlesex County Extension Service has also held demonstrations and lectures on subjects of interest to 
sewives and teachers. Equipment available for use by local societies now includes a lectern, I6mm 
a projector, screen, and slide projector. 

; Library's winter pre-school story program, which ran from October 1969 to May 1970, brought ap- 
ximately seventy-five children to the library in four groups, each meeting once a month for forty-five 
mtes. Three volunteers, Mrs. Bruce MacDonald, Mrs. William McGinley, and Mrs. Edmund 
3smore, plus the children's librarian each led a group in stories. 

r the summer 1970, two new programs were initiated in the Children's Room. In an overwhelming 
:ponse to the announcement that a summer pre-school story hour would be held at the library, one 
:dred and sixty-two children were registered for the program. Miss Victoria Fogg, a recent graduate 
-/owell State College, led the four groups which each met for one hour a week for ten weeks. 

; second new program was the Summer Reading Club for school-age children. Throughout the summer 
ty-seven children read a total of four hundred and forty-five books. There were weekly meetings 
e for lst-3rd graders, another for 4th-6th graders), but attendance was optional. These meetings were 
entially book reviewing sessions. The children were encouraged to talk about books they had read, and 
librarian also reviewed books. 

ginning in September 1970, the winter pre-school story program, which has been a regular program at 
library for many years, was expanded to reach more children, more often. One hundred and eighty 

Idren are registered for the program, with approximately one hundred and forty participating regularly, 
groups meet once every two weeks for one hour. Volunteers working with the librarian in the program 
Mrs. Bruce MacDonald, Mrs. William McGinley, Mrs. Robert Pease, Mrs. Allen Smith, Mrs. Ronald 

Iff, and Mrs. Robert Leahy. The purpose of this program is to give pre-schoolers an early and 
itive introduction to their public library. Because a library offers more than just books, these children 

5 exposed to films, records, games and simple crafts while the primary focus is on stories. It is felt 

t the children not only learn from these experiences, but also from involvement in a group situation. 

.he fall of 1970, a new program for school age children was implemented. This is the weekly Thursday 
;rnoon film program which draws upon the resources of the Eastern Regional Film collection. The 
ant of this program is to provide entertainment. But it is also hoped that more children, especially 
se who are not avid readers, will be introduced to the library as a community resource available to 
rm, and as a source of pleasure which is not necessarily derived from books. 

iias been shown that exposing children to books at an early age is beneficial in their future educational 
elopment. The public library is a primary resource for any community in meeting this end. However, 

;oday's world the public library must provide its patrons with more than books. For the Children's 

om it is felt that if a child finds the atmosphere friendly, inviting, and exciting it is not important if he 
cks out a book. He will turn to the library with which he is already familiar if the need or desire for a 

ik arises. Once we have attracted him to the library, we must meet his needs when he arrives. If we 
e naade him aware of the library before his need arises, he will be more apt to come to the library to 

isfy that need. If we serve the child well, our chances of him wanting our services as an adult are 

istantially increased. 



41 



Conservation Commission 



During the seventh year of its existence, the Conservation Commission continued its effort to preserve a 
improve the natural environment of the Town. Following is a summary of the most significant activities 
this Commission during the past year. 

Public Education: 

1. A public meeting was held in the Town Library June Z5, 1970 to discuss long range Conservation 
Commission plans and enlist public support for these plans. Talks were given, conservation 
movies shown and subcommittee discussions held. 

2. Articles of conservation interest were written and published in the Town Crier. 

3. Approximately two dozen books on conservation subjects were purchased and donated to the 
Wilmington Memorial Library. 

4. Three boys were sent to the Massachusetts Junior Conservation Camp. 

5. A series of Audubon Society lectures were sponsored for presentation to Wilmington 
Public School Children. 

6. A conservation display was sponsored in the Wilmington Memorial Library the week of 

April 12-18. All displays were prepared and contributed by the school children of Wilmington. 

7. A preliminary nature trail has been laid out on Woburn Street School land at the request of 
the school principal. The nature trail which will be completed during the spring of 1971 
will be used as an outdoor nature classroom by the children and teachers of the Woburn 
Street School. 

8. A conservation film, "The Silent Spring of Rachel Carson", was sponsored on October 8, 
1970, as a part of the Wilmington Memorial Library film program. 

9. An Arbor Day tree planting program in which students participated was held at the 
Whitefield, Walker, Swain and Buzzell Schools. 

Environmental Protection 

1. A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Soil Survey Study of the Town was initiated. 
The report will be completed in the spring of 1971. 

2. A USDA soil survey of the proposed high school site was initiated. 

3. Citizen complaints of possible Hatch Act violations were investigated. 

4. All Hatch Act hearings were supported with written reports of the Commission's position. 



42 



ironmental Protection: (continued) 



5. A letter was written to all members of the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce concerning 
the Conservation Commission's position in support of Flood Plain Zoning. 

6. Environmental "Hot Line" ads were placed in the Town Crier. 
Id Acquisition and Improvement: 

1. Received $5, 500 State reimbursement for IZ acres of "Self Help" land in north Wilmington. 
The monies were turned over to the Town. 

2. The above land was graded with bulldozers to eliminate boulder and rock formations and to 
provide slopes for winter sledding, A spring 1971 planting program is planned. 

3. Accepted transfer of several acres of Town-owned land. 

4. Examined several land sites for possible purchase. 

5. Applied for preliminary "Self Help" approval to purchase 13 acres of land, containing a 

' cranberry bog, adjacent to the Glen Road School. Purchase of this land is contingent of 
receiving both "Self Help" and Town Meeting approval. 



Permanent Building Committee 



.ccordance with respective votes of Town Meetings, the Permanent Building Committee pursued its 
:tions in connection with site acquisition and public building construction. 

reliminary land acquisition survey was undertaken on the so-called Roberts property and submitted to 
Town at our Town Meeting for its action. The Committee is presently considering other prospective 
iool sites. 

bliminary studies are being undertaken for a proposed addition to the Police Station in accordance with 
I vote of the Special Town Meeting on November 21, 1970. 

! Committee wishes to thank all other Town Committees, departments and personnel for their 
)pe ration. 



43 



Jury List 



(■•• Indicates Married Woman) 
(Revised - August 1, 1970) 

NAME 

l=Allard, Doris 

Allard, Richard 

Allen, Frankline E. 

Atamian, Harry N. 

Aylsworth, Willett G. 

Babine, Robert M. 

Backman, Carl A. , Jr. 
l=Backman, Hazel E. 

Barry, Leo G. 

Barry, Richard T. Sr. 

Beals, Robert C. 
'-Beaton, Irene C. 

Beaton, Joseph P. , Jr. 

Bicknell, Douglas P. 
'■Billings, Fay E. 

Boylen, George W. 

Bowman, Hollis B. 

Bradley, Henry E. , Jr. 

Bradley, William A. 
'=Brady, Helen M. 
'=Braman, Marion V. 

Brennick, Leo V. , Jr. 
■^=B right, Helen G. 
'=Browne, Helen B. 

Buckle, Thomas G. 

Burke, John J. 

Callahan, Robert J. 

Campbell, Allan D. 

Carleton, Edward G. 

Carter, Robert E. 
''Chambers, Helen 

Chislett, Ralph 
i=Condrey, Mary Gertrude 

Cooke, James K. 

Coolidge, Donald J. 

Corcoran, Edmund J. , Jr. 

Crawford, Ralph M. 
-''Cromwell, Effie L. 

Davey, James J. 



RESIDENCE OCCUPATION 



17 Cedar Crest Road 


Prod. Supt. 


14 Kelley Road 


Senior Acc't. 


8 6 Burlington Avenue 


Underwriter 


14 Hathaway Road 


Designer 


19 Pinewood Road 


Project Technician 


406 Chestnut Street 


Carpenter & Painter 


149 Aldrich Road 


Salesman 


151 Chestnut Street 


Housewife 


8 Chandler Road 


Tele. Communication 


37 Adams Street 


Retired 


14 Wicks Circle 


Eng. Aide 


1 6 King Street 


Housewife 


1 6 King Street 


Computer Programmer 


22 Belmont Avenue 


Elevator Constructor 


21 St rout Avenue 


Housewife 


22 Williams Avenue 


Retired 


22 Fairmeadow Road 


Printe r 


2 North Street 


Mechanic 


1 Frederick Drive 


Computer Programmer 


3 Roberts Road 


Cost Accounting 


4 Fairmeadow Road 


Systems Clerk 


Boutwell Street 


Tech. Specialist 


4 Lockwood Road 


Cafeteria Worker 


42 Middlesex Avenue 


Clerk 


80 Church Street 


Sale sman 


30 Sheridan Road 


Bus Driver 


Boutwell Street 


Accountant 


227 Burlington Avenue 


Steelworke r 


5 Fairview Avenue 


Inventory Clerk 


8 Forrest Street 


Salesman 


9 South Street 


Housewife 


2 Oakdale Road 


Retired 


6 Powder House Circle 


At Home 


5 Chandler Road 


Electro-Mech. Tech. 


117 Lake Street 


Forms Control Mgr. 


524 Woburn Street 


Local Testman 


3 Chase Road 


P. B. X. Foreman 


35 Adams Street 


Lecturer 


10 Fairmeadow Road 


P. B. X. Insp. Tester 



44 



RESIDENCE 


OCCUPATION 


214 Burlington Avenue 


Housewife 


24 Belmont Avenue 


Television Repairman 


23 High Street 


Management Member 


8 Sprucewood Road 


Waitre s s 


7 Chandler Road 


Asst. Manager 


46 Columbia Street 


Cable Splicer 


42 Adams Street 


Self Employed 


500 Salem Street 


Finisher 


66 Lawrence Street 


Self Employed 


8 Hillside Way 


Machine Operator 


9 Burt Road 


Publications Analyst 


10 Woodland Drive 


Mech. Tech. Supervisor 


5 Strout Avenue 


Ins. Acct. Sup. 


27 Moore Street 


Prod. Manager 


4 Baland Road 


Housewife 


25 Grace Drive 


Sr. Systems Engineer 


52 Federal Street 


Sr. Crew Scheduler 


27 Chestnut Street 


Machinist 


2 Muse Avenue 


Electrician Leader 


8 Kelley Road 


Retail Sales Manager 


9 Crest Avenue 


Elec. Tech. 


13 Church Street 


Tool & Die Maker 


33 Woburn Street 


Chief Engineer 


25 Concord Street 


Housewife 


1 Barbara Avenue 


Floor Refinisher 


111 Butters Row 


Salesman & Estimator 


6 River Street 


As semble r 


31 Glen Road 


Precision Grinder 


10 Sprucewood Road 


Bookkeepe r 


Kilmarnock Street 


Metal Spinner 


3 Marie Drive 


Housewife 


9 Loumac Road 


Housewife 


1 Kelly Road 


Housewife 


1 Kelly Road 


Ass't. Night Supervisor 


343 Salem Street 


Eng. Cost Analyst 


123 Chestnut Street 


Electrician 


45 Church Street 


Sr. Aerodynamics Eng. 


34 Marcia Road 


Senior Engineer 


60 Chestnut Street 


Mechanical Engineer 


109 Burlington Avenue 


N. E. Tel & Tel. 


3 Strout Avenue 


Banke r 


18 Carter Lane 


Adm. Assistant 


16 Kelley Road 


Plumber 


30 Shady Lane Drive 


Claims Adjuster 


6 Ledgewood Road 


Technician 


116 Aldrich Road 


Housewife 


11 Veranda Avenue 


Housewife 


6 Oakdale Road 


Cafeteria Worker 


9 Kelley Road 


Office Manager 


9 Kelley Road 


Housewife 


9 Kelley Road 


Accountant 



45 



Jury List: (continued) 



NAME 

Lanzillo, Wayne P. 

Lesnik, Martin I. 

Lowe, Edna Frances 
i=Lyons, Leila P. 

Lyons, William 

Mac Donald, Bruce 
'=McCue, Catherine 

McCue, Francis P. 

McLane, Charles 

McVicker, Robert N. 

Merrill, Francis 

Miller, Harold S. 
■'Montuori, Gertrude C. 

Moore, Eric E. 

Morin, Armand E. 

Morrice, Paul A. 

Muise, John A. 

Murray, John W. 

Noel, Clarence G. 

Norton, Augustus T. , Jr. 
:=0'Brien, Nora A. 

O'Connor, Alfred T. 
-O'Reilly, Doris M. 

Palazzi, Andrew 

Palmer, Ivan E. 

Pendergast, Thomas J. 

Pipes, Millard C. 

Pisani, Michael 

Piscatelli, Michael D. 

Poirier, William C. , Jr. 
I=Ring, Audrey F. 

Roselli, Joseph T. 

Russell, William H. 

Russo, Angela 

Scruton, H. Kent 
'^^Seitz, Eloise B. 

Sharkey, Kenneth G. 
''Sherrin, Evelyn M. 

Silva, Edward F. 

Smallidge, Hilliard C. 

Smith, Nathan E. 

Smith, Robert 

Spinney, Chester R. 

Spring, Walker C. 

Tenhuisen, Harold J. 

Thomas, Edward A. 

Traill, Robert H. 

Walking, Frederick A. 

Ward, Kenneth E. 

Washburn, Paul R. 

Welling, James 



RESIDENCE 

32 Fairmeadow Road 
4 Lawrence Court 
23 Linda Road 
107 Chestnut Street 
107 Chestnut Street 
181 Chestnut Street 
12 Lawrence Street 
12 Lawrence Street 
252 Middlesex Avenue 

16 Lawrence Court 
364 Chestnut Street 
25 King Street 

220 Burlington Avenue 
35 Concord Street 
118 Butters Row 
109 Middlesex Avenue 
99 West Street 
Laurel Avenue 
6 Glenview Road 
204 Wildwood Street 
39 Adams Street 
2 Canal Street 
34 Adams Street 

2 Chase Road 

29 Veranda Avenue 

17 Birchwood Road 
300 Chestnut Street 

12 Catherine Avenue 

4 St rout Avenue 

3 Chandler Road 

277 Middlesex Avenue 
Randolph Road 
10 Wildwood Street 
3 Sprucewood Road 
3 1 Moore Street 
711 Woburn Street 

18 Lawrence Street 
16 Gunderson Road 
65 West Street 

5 Sewell Road 
56 North Street 

6 State Street 

3 Pine ridge Road 
21 Thurston Avenue 
54 Chestnut Street 

13 Fairmeadow Road 
29 Burt Road 

8 Moore Street 

2 6 Miller Road 

20 Ballardvale Street 

12 Fay Street 



OCCUPATION 

Electrician 
Elec. Engineer 
Revenue Auditor 
Sec retary 
Brakeman 
Treasury Analyst 
T ransc ribe r 
Planner & Estimator 
Receiver 

Design Draftsman 
Maint. Mechanic 
Truck Driver-Mech. 
Housewife 

Experimental Mach. 

Test Group Leader 

Insurance Agent 

Punch Press Set-up 

Subcontractor 

Unemployed 

Eng. Aide 

Ope rator 

Insurance Agent 

Secretary 

Electrician 

Pump Repairman 

Meat Handler 

Retired 

Tool Grinder 

Automotive Manager 

Prod. Eng. 

Clerk 

Electrical Assembler 
Ass't. to Dept. Mgr. 
At Home 

Ass't. to Dir. of Adm. 
Sec. & Ass't. Purch. Age 
Sr. Staff Accountant 
Housewife 
American Airlines 
Filter Pump Oper. 
Computer Programmer 
Cash Reg. Repairman 
Retired 

Insurance Underwriter 
Chief Accountant 
Lithographic Stripper 
Coppersmith 
Mechanic 

Tele. Equip. Installer 
Ass't. Advert. Manager 
Store Engineer 



46 



iry List: (continued) 



NAME 

hitney, Ronald E. 
ibert, Anne I. 
illis, John F. 
ill son, Richard 
oods, Joseph H. , Jr. 
orby, Mary A. 
orth, Roger O. 
Drks, John W. 
imaites, George 
imbernardi, Mario 
.nn, Ruth C. 
zis, Francis J. 



RESIDENCE 

15 Thurston Avenue 

29 Glen Road 

10 Suncrest Avenue 

24 Thurston Avenue 
191 Wild-wood Street 
316 Middlesex Avenue 

25 Liberty Street 
9 Linda Road- 

6 Chapman Avenue 

7 Elwood Road 

179 Chestnut Street 
122 Nichols Street 



OCCUPATION 

Office Service Manager 
Lab. Assistant 
Project Engineer 
Ass't. Claims Supr. 
Letter Carrier 
Housewife 
Inventory Clerk 
Field Supervisor 
Retarder Operator 
Oil Business 
Retired 
Truck Driver 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



! list of measuring devices, meters. 


and weights adjusted and sealed dur 


ing the year 


1970 is as foil 




Adjusted 


Sealed 


Not Sealed 


Condenaned 


ances, Scales & Weights 


20 


123 


12 


15 


oacity Measures 





15 


2 


8 


juid Measuring Meters 


32 


144 


6 


6 


>er Measuring Devices 


8 


14 


3 


4 


weighing of Prepackaged Foods 


1200 









47 



Board of Appeals 



Applicant 

Case #1-70 
Richard W. Froton 

Case #2-70 
David C. Perkins 

Case #3-70 
John A. Webster 

Case #4-70 
George Stevens 
(James Meehan & 
D. Turcotte, Agents) 

Case #5-70 

Carmen & Rose DeFranzo 



Reason for Appeal 



For a variance to erect an addition to a building on a 
non-conforming lot at 8 Cedar Street. 



For a variance to correct errors made at the time of 
subdivision and building. 



For a special permit to excavate and remove earth 
products from 256 Andover Street. 



For a variance to erect a sign at 212 Main Street. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 
10 Edwards Road. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #6-70 

Jean-Cor Const. Corp. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on Radcliff 
Road within the required side yard. 



Granted 



Case #7-70 
CeCelia E. Hoban 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land at 16 School 
Street into two lots, each lot having insufficient 
frontage, depth and area. 



Granted 



Case #8-70 
Robert Dick 



For a variance to erect a building on a lot on Strout 
Avenue to be used for the restoration of antique auto, 
and to authorize a private garage for more than (3) 
vehicles. 



Denied 



Case #9-70 
Samuel W. Grant 



For a variance to conduct a metal fabrication business 
in a General Business District at 287 Main Street. 



Denied 



Case #10-70 
Lloyd V. Hubert 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 
5 Woodland Drive. 



Granted 



48 



alicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



36 #11-70 

lest A. Dentali 



For a variance to erect an addition on a lot at 
7 First Avenue within the required side yard. 



Granted 



56 #12-70 

jrmond & Geraldine 
Boly 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
First Avenue having insufficient frontage, depth 
and area. 



Denied 



56 #13-70 

menic H. & Stella Toto 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land at 23 
Jones Avenue into two lots each having sufficient 
frontage and area but insufficient depth. 



Denied 



se #14-70 

lice & Lucille Grossi 



For a variance to establish a fish fry takeout 
restaurant in a SRA District. 



Denied 



;se #15-70 

seph & Henry R. 

Stromarino 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land on Robin 
Road into two lots, one lot having insufficient depth 
and area and one lot having insufficient frontage, 
depth and area. 



Denied 



ise #16-70 

Iph & Nancy Garland 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land on Muse 
Avenue and Malloy Street, in order to square two 
lots. 



Granted 



se #17-70 
arles C. Baker 



,S6 #18-70 
ven L. Oremland 



For a variance to combine two lots on Taft Road 
and to redivide the parcel into two lots having in- 
sufficient depth and area to more closely conform 
to Section V-1 of the Zoning By-law. 



For a variance to erect an attached porch on a 
non-conforming lot at 9 Belmont Avenue. 



Granted 



Granted 



36 #19-70 
seph LaCreta 



For a variance to convert existing space on the third 
floor of a building at 418 Main Street into an apartment. 



Denied 



Ese #20-70 

laert & Eva Ricci 



;se #21-70 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot at 
3 Oakdale Street within the required rear yard. 

Cancelled Out. 



Granted 



i se #22-70 
thony & Edythe 
EF ranee SCO 



For a variance to erect an addition on a lot at 45 
North Street within the required side yard. 



Granted 



49 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Case #23-70 
Mary Callandrello 

Case #24-70 
Gordon H. Harnum 



Case #25-70 
Larz Neilson 



Case #26-70 
Joseph Galka & 
Raymond Paozkowski 

Case #27-70 
Kelmore Realty Trust 

Case #28-70 
Jackson Brothers 



Case #29-70 

James & Eleanor Demos 



Case #30-70 
Ambrose H. Bonnano 



Case #31-70 
Frank W. C of fill 



Case #32-70 

Case #33-70 

Charles R. Pembrook 



Case #34-70 
Louis R. Moore 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at 677 
Main Street. 



For a special permit at 867 Woburn Street for 
the inside and outside storage of material and 
equipment other than those specifically permitted 
in Section 3-4 of the Zoning By-law. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a building 
at 364 Middlesex Avenue within the required 
front yard. 



For a variance on two lots on Butters Row, each 
having insufficient depth according to Section V-5 
of the Zoning By-law. 



For a variance to erect a repair garage in an 
Industrial District at 326 Ballardvale Street. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
Middlesex Avenue having insufficient depth 
according to Section V-5 of the Zoning By-law. 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land on 
Hopkins Street into two lots, each lot having 
insufficient frontage, depth and area. 



For a variance to erect a swimming pool on a lot 
at 232 Shaw sheen Avenue within the rear and side 
yard. 



For a variance to combine two non-conforming 
lots on Aldrich Road 

Case Withdrawn 



For a variance to divide a parcel of land at 84 
Shaw sheen Avenue each lot having insufficient 
depth and area. 



For a variance to erect an attached porch on a 
non-conforming lot. 



50 



plicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



se #35-70 

R. Realty Trust 



For a special permit to operate an indoor breeding 
laboratory for medical or scientific research. 



Granted 



se #36-70 



R. Realty Trust 



se #37-70 



chael J. Simmons 



se #38-70 



yUiam T. Allen 



:se #39-70 



len C. Syvertson 



se #40-70 



ra M. Theriault 



For a variance to erect a rubber-coated water 
tank "Fabritank" on a lot on Ballardvale Street. 



For a variance to erect a garage. 



For a special permit to live in an existing dwelling 
at 68 McDonald Road until a new dwelling is built 
on the same lot. 



For a variance to combine two lots at the corner 
of Morse Avenue and Denault Road and redivide 
the parcel into two lots. 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
Lexington Street . 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



se #41-70 

msons Realty Trust 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
Federal Street. 



Granted 



se #42-70 
Iford G. Hirtle 



For a variance of 10 feet to erect a garage on a lot 
at 15 Jaquith Road. 



Granted 



ise #43-70 

m & Priscilla Cipriani 



For a variance to erect a porch on a lot at 35 
Dadant Drive . 



Granted 



se #44-70 
arles Ingalls 
id others) 



For a special permit to build a clubhouse, lodge or 
other non-profit recreational, social, educational 
or civic use. 



Granted 



se #45-70 

len C. Syvertson 



se #46-70 



rz Realty Trust 



se #47-70 



lliam C. Cawthron 



For a variance to combine two lots at the corner 
of Morse Avenue and Denault Road and redivide 
the parcel into two lots. 



For a special permit to erect a building at 364 
Middlesex Avenue. 



For a variance to maintain a swimming pool within 
the required rear yard. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



51 



Applicant 



Reason For Appeal 



Case #48-70 
Harriett M. Jillett 



Case #49-70 
Francis D. Cronin 



Case #50-70 
Sidney R. Kaizer 



Case #51-70 



Irving H. Day 

Case #60-70 
Sidney R. Kaizer 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on 
a non-conforming lot at 28 Veranda Avenue. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling 
within the required side yard. 



For a variance to erect an addition to a non-conforming 
dwelling and to erect the addition within the required 
side yard. 



Luther M. Child 


For a variance to conduct a manufacturing business 
consisting of finishing blocks at 8 Oakwood Road. 


Case #52-70 
Romolo & Joseph 
DiBenedetto 


For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
Blackstone Street. 


Case #53-70 
Ernest A. Dentali 


For a variance to erect a carport within the required 
front yard. 


Case #54-70 
Samuel E. Pica 


For a variance to combine two non-conforming lots 
at 16 West Jamaica Avenue. 


Case #55-70 
Frederick Sheehan 


For a variance to use land in a SRA District as 
parking area on West Street for an adjacent indus- 
trial district. 


Case #56-70 
Catherine M. Emery 


For a variance to erect an addition to a dwelling on 
a non- conforming lot at 39 Hanover Street. 


Case #57-70 
Scully Signal Co. 


For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at Northern 
Industrial Park. 


Case #58-70 
Louis R. Moore 


For a variance to erect a screened-in porch to an 
existing dwelling on a non-conforming lot. 


Case #59-70 





For a variance to erect an addition to a non-conforming 
building on a lot at 407 Woburn Street. 



For a variance to erect a carport on a non-conforming 
lot at 5 Cottage Street, 



52 



blicant 



se #61-70 
ancis Shukis 



se #6Z-70 

'iurice E. Needham 



: se #63-70 

S;hard Lesperance 

:| se #64-70 

lien C. Syvertson 

- se #65-70 

.;cci's Realty Trust 

se #66-70 
eetheart Plastics 



se #67-70 

elyn J. Wallace 

ise #68-70 
i^in R. Dyer 

^se #69-70 

ivens Family Trust 

inon Cutter 

;se #70-70 
ise Pellechia 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



For a variance to erect an addition to an existing 
dwelling on a non- conforming lot at 7 Cedar Street. 



Granted 



For a variance from the Building By-law to use 
manufactured roof trusses as an alternate method 
of roof construction. 



Granted 



For a variance to maintain a utility building on a 
lot at 759 Woburn Street. 



Granted 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot at the 
corner of Morse Avenue and Denault , Road. 



Granted 



For a variance to maintain a temporary trailer on 
a lot at 2 1 1 Lowell Street for bank use only. 



For a variance to use land in a SRA District at 1 
Burlington Avenue for parking. 



Granted 



Granted 



5; Si 



For a variance to erect a sign on a lot at 355 Main 
Street. 



Pending 



For a variance to erect a garage on a lot at 18 
Kenwood Avenue. 



Granted 



For a special permit to keep cats in a nutrition 
centre on a lot at 845 Woburn Street. 



Granted 



For a variance to erect a dwelling on a lot on 
Lloyd Road having insufficient depth and area. 



Granted 



53 



Accepted Streets 



Strc Gt 


F r om 


1 o 


Miles Feet 


Date (s) Accepte 


A H 3 trr™* c ^ 1" T o t» t" 
X^LlcLllls O L i. C C L 


IVi-lUl-LlC t> C?t J^VCliLlc 


t— A T^O 

X^dllS-Cl OUICCL 




4600 


3-02-08 








o TTj K» Q Q A f r A V1 1 1 A 

o lid w b xic cii ji.vt;iiu.c; 


iJlllcxlCd Ijinc 




2 


1 1 _n6-Q4 






And-OvG r Street 


Salem Street 


Andover Line 




3 


1 1 QA 

1 1 — UD— yrr 


■3. 
_> 


— 1 


Anthony Avenue 


Salem Street 


Catherine Avenue 






lU-uO— DO 






Arlene Avenue 


Salem Street 


Dorothy Avenue 






10-03-66 






Auburn Avenue 


Shaw sheen Avenue 






800 


3-12-45 






Ayotte Street 


Westdale Avenue 


Cre st Avenue 




240 


3 _ 1 0-47 






Baker Street 


Brand Avenue 






700 


_> — 1 — ^ J 






Ballard vale Street 


Salem. Street 


Andover Line 


2. 


7 


X X— \_/u— /rr 






Bancroft Street 


Liberty Street 


X_) IVi x\.xx. 




400 


3 _ 1 7 _ ^1? 






Beacon Street 


Church Street 


Belmont Avenue 




1000 


3-01-15 








Burlington Avenue 


XDyxOn OLxccL 




1000 


3 - 10-47 






Beeching A.venue 


Cunningham Street 


Faulkner A. venue 




450 


J — X — _J 7 






Belmont Avenue 


Columbia Street 


otate otreei 




1000 


J — VJ J — J J 






Birchwood Road 


juuitn xv-oaa 


Short Street 




1550 


J — X / — J 


3 


— X 


xj out we 11 otreet 


-rt-iQiicn xvoaa 


Burlington Avenue 


0. 


8 


1 1-06-94 


3 


- 12 


XJ 1 dllLl XA-VCIILIC 


xjxiuyc j-jdiic 


IDdixCX O L X t: C L 




2370 


3-13-33 


3 


-08 


X-JXCLLLXC OUICCL 


IVXd bodL.XlU.oCLts -il- V c . 


(r3 T* iH (3 n AxT'OTino 
v^dXtXCll X^VCllLLC 




1100 


3- 12-45 






Brentwood Avenue 


-Woodside Avenue 


Vv ODUxn OLXccL 




907 


6-21-38 






Bridge Lane 


^lain Street 


Shaw sheen Avenue 


0. 


3 


1 1 -nA_Q4. 

X X — WU — 7^ 






Broad Street 


Carmel Street 


iDOtn ways 




1377 


-J 1 -3 
J - i J - 






Burlington Avenue 


Main Street 


Burlington Line 


1. 


6 


11-06-94 






Burnap Street 


Grove Avenue 


Winchell Road 




1378 


3-12-45 


3 


-10 


Burt Road 


Cedar Street 


Fall Street 




2500 


3-12-45 


3 


-11 


Butters Row 


Main Street 


Chestnut Street 


0. 6 


11-06-94 






Catherine Avenue 


Arlene Avenue 


Dorothy Avenue 






10-03-66 






Canal Street 


Shaw sheen Avenue 


Burt Road 




1511 


10-16-39 


3 


-12 


Carolyn Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 




950 


3-12-60 






Carson Avenue 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 




677 


3-10-53 


3 


-12 


Carson Ave. Ext. 


Marie Drive 






300 


3-11-61 






Carter Lane 


Shaw sheen Avenue 






1400 


3-09-57 






Cedar Street 


Harris Street 


Burt Road 




600 


3-12-45 






Cedar Crest Road 


Pinewood Road 


Judith Road 




1100 


5-27-63 






Central Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Church Street 




574 


10-16-50 






Chandler Road 


Kelley Road 


Adams Street 




400 


3-09-57 






Chapman Avenue 


Hathaway Road 






322 


3-05-51 






Chase Road 


Hathaway Road 






297 


3-10-53 






Chestnut Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Woburn Line 


2. 


1 


11-06-94 






Church Street 


Main Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


0. 


8 


11-06-94 






Clark Street 


Main Street 


Church Street 


0. 


8 


11-06-94 






Cochrane Road 


Forest Street 


Warren Road 




800 


3-10-47 







54 



street 


From 


To 


Miles 


Feet 


Date (s) Accepted 


ilumbia Street 


Church Street 


Talbot Avenue 


0. 1 




3-02-08 3-13-33 


mcord Street 


Federal Street 


No. Reading Line 


1. 1 




11-06-94 


ingress Street 


Forest Street 


Burlington Line 




965 


10-16-39 


lok Avenue 


Main Street 


Kensington Avenue 




1000 


3-11-46 


lolidge Road 


Hathaway Road 






270 


3-05-51 


irey Avenue 


Grand Street 


Canal Street 




370 


3-05-51 


ittage Street 


Main Street 






920 


3-13-54 


•est Avenue 


Ayotte Street 






560 


3-10-47 


•OSS Street 


Main Street 


Lowell Street 




900 


11-06-94 


inningham Street 


Salem. Street 


Beeching Avenue 




2320 


3-44 3-52 3-53 


•press Street 


Glen Road 






260 


3-05-51 



,dant Drive 


North Street 


North Street 




1710. 4 


3-14-64 




.vis Street 


Main Street 






500 


3-17-52 




.yton Road 


Hathaway Road 






170 


3-05-51 




:11 Drive 


Burlington Avenue 






450 


3-08-58 




)bson Street 


Glen Road 


Gary Street 




1402 


3-13-54 ' 




»rchester Street 


Billerica Line 






1400 


3-05-51 




irothy Avenue 


Barbara Avenue 


Arlene Avenue 




1556 


3-12-60 ; 




'aper Drive 


Gunderson Road 






100 


3-14-59 




•ury Lane 


School Street 


Glen Road 






3-09-63 




iblin Avenue 


Main Street 






500 


3-05-51 




inton Road 


Nassau Avenue 


Both Ways 




638 


3-10-56 


:) 


mes Street 


Main Street 


Woburn Street 


0. 7 




11-06-94 




Iwards Road 


Forest Street 


Baldwin Road 




450 


3-10-47 




iwood Road 


Forest Street 


Dead End 




642 


3-09-68 




nerson Street 


Oakwood Road 


Faulkner Avenue 




600 


3-05-51 





irfield Avenue 
.irmeadow Road 
-irview Avenue 
.neuil Drive 
ulkner Avenue 
.y Street 
:deral Street 
•rguson Road 
oradale Avenue 
>rest Street 
•ederick Drive 



's ■»■■ 



•4/ 



Main Street 
Nichols Street 
State Street 
Massachusetts Ave. 
Glen Road 
Glen Road 
Middlesex Avenue 
Shaw sheen Avenue 
Burlington Avenue 
Aldrich Road 
Salem Street 



Nichols Street 



W. Jamaica Avenue 
Gary Street 
Woburn Street 
Dead End 
Dead End 
Burlington Avenue 



1. I 



0. 8 



1300 


3 


-11 


-46 


2328 


3 


-08 


-58 


650 


3 


-13 


-33 


1000 


10 


-16 


-50 


2671 


3 


-13 


-44 


700 


6 


-21 


-38 




11 


-06 


-94 


1072. 61 


3 


-11 


-67 


625 


3 


-21 


-70 




11 


-06 


-94 




10 


-03 


-66 



10-53 
12-45 



en Road 


Main Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


1. 


3 




11 


-06 


-94 


endale Circle 


Glen Road 


Glen Road 






1300 


3 


-17 


-52 


enview Road 


Siincrest Avenue 








360 


3 


-14 


-59 


)wing Road 


Park Street 


Marcus Road 






900 


3 


-10 


-56 


(•ace Drive 


Shawsheen Avenue 










10 


-03 


-66 


•and Street 


Shaw sheen Avenue 


Dunmore Road 






850 


3 


-17 


-52 


(•ant Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR. 






780 


3 


-08 


-43 


•ove Avenue 


Main Street 


Lake Street 


0. 


4 




9 


-29 


-10 


inderson Road 


Hathaway Road 
Marie Drive 


Both Ways 






1081 


3 
10 


-14 
-03 


-59 
-66 



55 




Street 


F rom 


J. O 


Mile s 


r eet 


Date (s 


) Acceptec 


I T 

ri3.mlin Lane 


Lawrence Street 








D 30 


^ 1 A 

J - i u 


A? 




Hanson Road 


Woodland Road 


ueau jii»na 








1 c 


aq 
-09 




Hardin Street 


Aldrich Road 


Lubbers Brook 






OCA 


T AC 


-51 


2-11- 


Harnden Street 


Main Street 


Glen Road 


0. 


1 




3-04 


-95 




Harris Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Cedar Street 






700 


3-12 


-4D 




Harvard Avenue 


Main Street 


River Street 








1 AC 


-D I 




Hathaway Road 


Woburn otreet 


Gunderson Road 






1 O O 

lis bo 


"3 CI 

3 -b i 


"2 


c; "2 "2 E 


Hawthorne Road 


Woburn Street 








"> 1 r\ 


"2 1 A 


-56 




High Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Woburn Street 


0. 


5 




11-06 


-94 




Hillside Way 


Chestnut Street 


Burlington Line 


n 
U . 


D 




3-02 


1 A 




riiiitop xvoaa 


Suncrest Avenue 










1 ^ A 
J - i 4 


CO 

-b9 




Hob son Avenue 


Pine Avenue 


IdU It. beyond 






ion 


:> -4b 


J - 


^^ "2 c 

D I J - _ 






Wiser Street 














• 

Hopkins Street 


Shaw sheen Avenue 


Billerica Line 


n 
u . 


c 
D 




11 n A 
1 i - Ud 






iTac^uith Road 


Shawsheen Avenue 










J - uo 


-48 


3-49 3 


Jere Road 


Fairmeadow Road 


Fairmeadow Road 






1247 


3-09 


-68 




Jones Avenue 


Glen Road 








719 


6-10 


- 




juuitn noau 


Birchwood Road 


Cedar Crest Road 








^ in 
o - 1 U 


- D J 




x\.ciicy xvoaa 


Adams otreet 








1 CD 


no 


-57 

— ~j t 




i\.enQaii olpccl 


^±Qricn xvoaQ 


Blanchard Road 






1 ^nn 

i O VJ u 


^ 1 7 


-45 




x\. c 11 w o ou -rt-vciiLit; 


vv ouurn otrccL 


xvcQwooa ± cx rdct: 






-? J u 


D — Ci i. 


— 1 u 




Kie rnan A.venue 


Kdain Street 










J - UO 


— 3 O 




Kilmarnock Street 


West Street 


Reading Line 


n 


C 
D 




1 i - U D 


Q A 

- 7T: 




King Street 


Glen Road 


Broad Street 








A 1 n 
D - 1 u 


An 


3 - 12 - 


Kirk Street 


Main Street 








7 ? 
Die 


J - U D 


— J 1 




Lake Street 


M^am Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1 


n 

U 




1 1 nA 

1 1 - U D 


Q A 




Lang Street 


Bancroft Street 


ID &c iVi xvxv. 






rtUU 


^ 17 


— 3 ^ 




Laurel Avenue 


Malloy Road 


Parker Street 






DD ( 


1 A 1 A 
1 U - i D 


-DU 




Lawrence Court 


Lawrence Street 








Do J 


1 1 A 


-56 




Lawrence Street 


Glendale Circle 


Shady Lane Drive 






3773 


3-10 


-56 




Ledgewood Road 


Suncrest Avenue 








383 


3-14 


-59 




Liberty Street 


r eclerai otreet 


£5 & M KK.. 






7 >1 A 


o - Do 


-43 




Lincoln Street 


i" ederai otreet 


Jd & M KK. 






7 "5 A 


D -UO 


-43 




Linda Koad & Lxt. 


riign otreet 








1 O /] A R 


in 1 A 


-50 


3-14- 


Lioyd Koad 


Main Street 








1 A C A 


"2 n EX 


-51 




Lockwood Road 


rsaiiardvale otreet 








AAA 

990 


3 - Uv 


-57 




Longview Road 


Middlesex Avenue 










"2 1/1 

J - i 4 


-59 




Loumac Road 


Drury Lane 


T o End 










-63 




Lowell Street 


Main Street 


Reading Line 


1 


Q 

7 




11 A 
1 i - (J D 


-94 




Lowell St. Park 


otation ( - DU 


otation i^-DK) 








1 Q n Q 


- 1957 


Mackey Road 


Federal Street 








250 


3-08 


-43 




Main Street 


Tewksbury Line 


Woburn Line 


4. 







11-06 


-94 




Marcus Road 


Gowing Road 


Gowing Road 






2315 


3-08 


-58 




Marcia Road 


North Street 








1130 


3-10 


-62 




Marie Drive 


Woburn Street 


Thrush Road 






1285 


3-11 


-61 






Thrush Road 


Gunderson Road 








10-03 


-66 




Marion Street 


Burlington Avenue 








(1739) 


9-01 


-06 


Count^ 












( 900) 


3-12 


-45 




Marjorie Road 


Main Street 








1550 


3-05 


-51 





56 



Street 



From 



To 



Miles Feet Date (s) Accepted 



assachusetts Ave. 


Main Street 


ot. i-^aui otreet 




o n A 


6 


- 1 Z 


-4ri 


cJJonaia Koad 


Salem Street 






1 /I 9 /t 




- 1 J 


A A 

-44 


eadow Lane 


Suncrest Avenue 






"2 ^ "2 
JO J 




-09 


-57 


elody Lane 


Shawsheen Avenue 








1 r* 

10 


-03 


-66 


iddlesex Avenue 


Main Street 


Salem Street 2. 


3 




11 


-06 


-94 


iles Street 


Main Street 


Hobson Avenue 




400 


3 


-12 


-45 


liller Road 


Ciien Koad 


Emerson Street 






3 


-12 


-45 


loore Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Wedgewood Avenue 




1 c o o 


3 


-11 


-67 


orse Avenue 


Woburn Street 






lib I 


10 


-lb 


-39 


ystic Avenue 


Middlesex Avenue 






c n Q 


i 


-0<i 


-Oo 


assau Avenue 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Decatur Street 




2000 


3 


-11 


-46 


ichols Street 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Shawsheen River 0. 


7 




11 


-06 


-94 


ickerson Avenue 


West Street 






900 


3 


-10 


-47 


orfolk Street 


Carter Lane 


Nassau Avenue 




538 


3 


-13 


-54 


orth Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Dadant Drive 




3533 


3 


-12 


-45 


unn Road 


Kelley Road 






213 


3 


-13 


-65 


ak Street 


Salem Street 






350 


3 


-19 


-51 


akdale Road 


Judith Road 


Short Street 




2280 


10 


-16 


-50 


akridge Circle 


Cowing Road 


Cowing Road 




1730 


3 


-08 


-58 


akwood Road 


Main Street 


Fairfield Avenue 




850 


3 


-11 


-46 


Ison Street 


Church Street 






132 


3 


-09 


-57 



ark Street 


Woburn Street 


No. Reading Line 





9 




11 


-06 


-94 








arker Street 


Lowell Street 


Blackstone Street 


0. 


36 




3 


-04 


-07 


3 


-03 


-19 


atricia Circle 


Dell Drive 


Dell Drive 






595 


3 


-08 


-58 








ershing Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR. 






720 


3 


-08 


-43 








hillips Avenue 


Wiser Street 


Wild Avenue 






1800 


3 


-11 


-46 


3 


-13 


-54 


illing Road 


Hathaway Road 


Both Ways 






930 


3 


-14 


-59 








ine Avenue 


Main Street 


Hobson Avenue 






400 


3 


-12 


-45 








ineridge Road 


North Street 


Linda Road 






900 


3 


-12 


-60 








ineview Road 


Lipp Street 


Adelman Road 






450 


3 


-10 


-53 








inewood Road 


Birchwood Road 


Shady Lane Drive 






1332 


3 


-13 


-54 








leasant Road 


Middlesex Avenue 


Linda Road 






750 


3 


-10 


-62 








owder House Circle 


Middlesex Avenue 








730 


3 


-13 


-54 








i.ailroad Avenue 


Clark Street 


Stone Street 


0. 


2 




3 


-01 


-09 








edwood Terrace 


Kenwood Avenue 


Dead End 






645 


3 


-21 


-70 








idge Road 


Suncrest Avenue 








365 


3 


-10 


-56 








iver Street 


Massachusetts Ave. 


Harvard Avenue 






440 


3 


-10 


-62 








.oberts Road 


Burlington Avenue 








1860 


3 


-11 


-67 








.ollins Road 


Fenway Street 


Marion Street 






200 


3 


-13 


-54 








.oosevelt Road 


Boutwell Street 


Swain Road 






2000 


3 


-11 


-46 








.oyal Street 


Salem Street 








1040 


3 


-05 


-51 








alem Street 


Tewksbury Line 


No. Reading Line 


2. 


7 




1 1 


-06 


-94 


3 


-05 


-06 


chool Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


High School Lot 






616 


3 


-01 


-15 










Buzzell School 


Dead End 








3 


-09 


-63 








ewell Road 


Hathaway Road 








380 


3 


-12 


-55 








hady Lane Drive 


Middlesex Avenue 


Lawrence Street 






2676 


3 


-08 


-58 








haw sheen Avenue 


Main Street 


Billerica Line 


2. 


2 




1 1 


-06 


-94 








heridan Road 


Hathaway Road 








487 


3 


-05 


-51 









57 



Street 



From 



To 



Miles Feet Date (s) Accepted 



Silver Lake Avenue 


Lake Street 


Dexter Street 






455 


3 


-13 


-54 


Sprucewood Road 


Shady Lane Drive 


Short Street 






Ann 
ouu 


D 


1 "7 




State Street 


Belmont Avenue 


Fairview Avenue 






275 


3 


-03 


-33 


Strout Avenue 


Lowell Street 








aq l 

DO D 




-it 


-bb 


Suncrest Avenue 


West Street 








1246 


3 


-13 


-54 


Swain Road 


Fore st Street 


Burlington Avenue 


0. 


4 




3 


-20 


-22 


Taft Road 


Swain Road 


Boutwell Street 






1985. 53 


6 


-21 


-38 


Taplin Avenu-e 


Hobson Avenue 


Lubbers Brook 






900 


3 


-11 


-46 


Temple Street 


Church Street 








274 


6 


-06 


-11 


Thrush Road 


Salem Street 


Marie Drive 






400 


3 


-11 


-61 


Thurston Avenue 


Church Street 




0. 


2 




3 


-04 


-07 


T ruman Road 


Hathaway Road 








300 


3 


-10 


-53 


Upton Court 


Andover Street 




0. 


1 




11 


-06 


-94 


Veranda Avenue 


Main Street 


Lubbers Brook 






1075 


3 


-06 


-16 


Virginia Road 


No. Reading Line 








1200 


3 


-13 


-54 


Walker Street 


Main Street 








423 


3 


-08 


-58 


Warren Road 


Lake St. , Tewks. 


-- 






100 


3 


-13 


-54 


Washington Avenue 


Clark Street 


Chase Street 


0. 


3 




3 


-01 


-20 


Webber Street 


Burlington Avenue 


Dead End 






680 


3 


-15 


-69 


Wedgewood Avenue 


Moore Street 


Dead End 






475 


3 


-11 


-67 


West Street 


Woburn Street 


Reading Line 


1. 


7 




1 1 


-06 


-94 


Westdale Avenue 


West Street 


B & M RR. 






1211 


6 


-22 


-42 


Wightman Road 


Warren Road 


Albert Street 






230 


3 


-13 


-54 


Wild Avenue 


Grove Avenue 


B & M RR. 


0. 


2 




12 


-29 


-10 


Wildwood Street 


Middlesex Avenue 


Woburn Street 


1. 


1 




11 


-06 


-94 


Williams Avenue 


Main Street 








693 


6 


-10 


-40 


Wilson Street 


Federal Street 


B & M RR. 






760 


3 


-08 


-43 


Wilton Drive 


Shaw sheen Avenue 










10 


-03 


-66 


Winchell Road 


Grove Avenue 


Burnap Street 






200 


3 


-12 


-45 


Wing Road 


Woburn Street 








746 


3 


-08 


-58 


Wiser Street 


Main Street 


Taplin Avenue 






900 


10 


-16 


-50 


Woburn Street 


Andover Street 


Woburn Line 


4. 


2 




11 


-06 


-94 


Woodland Road 


Lowell Street 


Dead End 






1170 


3 


-15 


-69 


Woodlawn Avenue 


Border Avenue 


Kensington Avenue 






250 


3 


-17 


-52 



Constable 

I herewith submit my Annual Report as Constable of the Town of Wilmington for the year 1970. 

I have posted Notices and Warrants for the Annual Town Meeting, Special Town Meeting, State Primary 
and State Election, in accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington. 

I have also served and posted notices for other Officers and Departments of the Town of Wilmington. 



58 



Redevelopment Authority 



e Members of the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority send greetings to the citizens of the Town of 
Imington and are proud to present the Annual Report of the Authority. 

e Wilmington Redevelopment Authority presented the Land Assembly plan to the Annual Town Meeting of 
70 and received the Town's approval of a bond issue of $200, 000 to carry out the Eames Street Industrial 
.rk Project. 

.e approved project plan was then submitted to the Department of Community Affairs, Commonwealth of 
issachusetts, for approval. After some delays during the summer and fall, the Authority received notice 
jm the Commonwealth that the plan had been approved. The Authority is now in the process of assembling 
! land for re -sale. 

. March 10, 1970 the appointment of Mr. Milton L. Bradford, Jr. , as State -Appointed member, was 
ceived from the Department of Community Affairs. Mr. Bradford is to fill the unexpired term of 
hn R. Evans, which term will expire on May 17, 1974. Mr. Evans resigned as State Member when he 
)ved out of the state in 1969. 

e Redevelopment Authority has continued to send minutes of all meetings to the Board of Selectmen, 
nance Committee, and Planning Board in an effort to keep these boards informed as to the progress of 
! Authority. We will continue this practice during the next year. 

i.e Wilmington Redevelopment Authority wishes to thank the Boards, Committees, and citizens of the Town 
).ose splendid cooperation has helped us to receive approval of the Land Assembly project. 



59 



Reserve Fund Transfers - 1970 
Reserve Fund Voted at 1970 Annual Meeting - $50, 000 



Date Acct. ff 

8/17 955 

9/14 700/B9 

9/16 710/B3 

10/15 Police Expense 

10/5 Police C rui se r 

10/21 200-D/5 

Police Dept. Expense 

10/21 Election Salaries 

11/12 710/B13 

11/30 Tree Dept. 

12/1 #995 

12/8 #976 

12/9 #205 

12/15 Fire Dept. 

Salarie s 

12/29 Police Dept. 

Expense s 

12/29 Snow & Ice 

Salarie s 

12/29 Snow & Ice 

Expense s 



Acct. Title & Reason for Transfer 

Regional Vocational School 
Acct. Voted $40. 00 Short 

(Misc. Contractual Service 
Repairs &; Maintenance) 
Public Buildings 

Protection Persons & Property- 
Riot Control Equipment 
Replace 1970 Police Cruiser 
Police Cruiser damaged in accident 

Tellers, Police, Firemen at Spec. 
Town Meeting Including Increase 
in Salarie s 

Electric & Telephone Bills, Teletype 
at Police Station, Phones at Town 
Hall Annex 

Salaries for remainder of 1970 

Demolition of substandard structures 

Removal of Grove Ave. houses 

Replace Brake System on Fire Truck 

Unable to pre -determine cost of 
time and one half 

Gas, Oil and repairs. Insufficient 
funds in budget 

Salaries for Snow Removal. 
Insufficient money appropriated 

Rental of Equipment for snow 
Removal. Insufficient money 
appropriated. 



Amount 
T ransferred 

$ 40. 00 



2, 000. 00 

1, 750. 00 

1, 200. 00 

2, 780. 00 
400. 00 

1, 000. 00 

3, 000. 00 

1, 050. 00 
902. 00 
3, 200. 00 
3, 500. 00 
3, 500. 00 

582. 23 

7, 063. 61 



(Balance of 
Reserve fund) 
18, 032. 16 



60 



School Committee 



School Committee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1970. The 
mbership of the Committee was as follows: 

John D. Brooks, Chairman 
Walter J. McNamara, Vice Chairman 
L. Barbara Hooper, Secretary- 
Diana C. Imbimbo 
Arnold F. Lanni 
William J. Fay, Jr. - 
Nancy Clark 

Re signed from the Committee on May 2Z, 1970. 
-.^-''-Appointed to the Committee on June 15, 1970. 



The Building Program and Its Future Direction 



ring the year 1970, the Committee wrestled with the immense problem having to do with future school 
astruction. The Committee voted in May, 1970 to pursue the direction of a new 1, 600 pupil high school 
ich would, if constructed, satisfy all building needs for years to come. This plan called for converting 
present high school into a junior high school and then converting the two intermediate schools to ele- 
ntary buildings. This plan would have allowed for the phasing out of older structures such as the Swain, 
Iker, and Whitefield Schools. 



# .- 



the Special Town Meeting of November 21, 1970, the townspeople did not elect to vote favorably on the 
rrant article having to do with the purchase of a site for a new high school. 

e Committee, working with the Superintendent of Schools, set about mapping the future direction it would 
;e. As a result an Advisory Committee was formed to assist the School Committee with this enormous 
I most important task. The make-up of the Advisory Committee is as follows; 



School Committee 

School Administration 
Board of Selectmen 
Finance Committee 
Planning Board 
Conservation Committee 
Recreation Commission 
High School Faculty 
Citizens 



John Brooks 
L. Barbara Hooper 
Walter H. Pierce 
James Miceli 
Richard Howlett 
Morton Grant 
David Townley 
John Waugh 
Alfred Hambelton 
Lional Baldwin 
Richard Cogan 
William Mackinnon 
John Nealon 
David T rickett 



61 



The purpose and function of this Committee will be as follows: 



Purpose: The Advisory Committee was formulated to assist the School Committee and Administratio 
in the future direction of its Building Program. This Committee made up of Town Board Membe 
and Citizens bring a wide knowledge and experience which the School Committee and Administrat 
believe will be of tremendous value in assisting them with this most important program. 

Function: The function of this Committee will be to scrutinize all available information in addition to 
new information forwarded to them by the School Administration and to make recommendations t 
the School Cominittee as to their findings and as to the various options that could be taken in 
solving our building needs. 

The Advisory Committee will deal with the following areas: 



Site investigation - new sites, a new high school 

Site investigation - present site, an addition program 

Cost estimates - a new high school 

Cost estimates - an addition program 

Site development costs - a new high school 

Site development costs - an addition program 

Land acquisition costs - a new high school 

Land acquisition costs - an addition program 

Review of Educational Specifications - a new high school 

Review of Educational Specifications - an addition program 



It is hoped that the Advisory Committee will complete their findings and make specific recommendations 
the School Committee in the spring of 1971. 

In other matters involving the total operation of the Wilmington Public Schools, the Committee dealt with 
the following: 

1. The Committee entered into collective bargaining with teachers, administrators, secretaries, 
nurses, and cafeteria personnel on salaries and conditions of employment. The result was the 
realization of salary schedules and conditions of employment with the above groups which kept 
Wilmington in a competitive position with surrounding communities. 

Z. The Committee in its quest for qualified teachers entered into recruitment programs with the 
following colleges and universities: 



In addition to these institutions, information about the Wilmington Public Schools is distributed t^ 
many colleges and universities in other states. This effort has successfully attracted candidate; 
from all over the nation. 



Boston College 
Boston State College 
Boston University 
Emmanuel College 
Fitchburg State College 
Harvard University 
Lowell State College 
University of Massachusetts 



Northeastern University 
Regis College 
Salem State College 
Simmons College 
Springfield College 
Tufts University 
Wellesley College 



62 



3. 



Resignations were received from 42 teachers for the following reasons: 



Professional Improvement 6 Maternity 5 

Family Responsibility 8 Counselled Out 1 

Leaves of Absence 4 Retirement 1 

Teach in other Communities 10 Death 1 

Marriage 6 

Mrs. Margaret Jordan, a staff member, retired after the close of the 1969-70 school year. She 
was a Grade two teacher at the Walker School for a number of years and was well respected by 
the Committee, administration, fellow teachers, parents, and pupils. The Committee wishes her 
well in her retirement years. 

The Committee also wishes to acknowledge the retirement of Mrs. Eleanor Day who served as 
High School Secretary for many years. The Committee extends its appreciation to Mrs. Day for 
her faithful service and wishes her a fruitful retirement. 



4. The Committee also dealt with testbook adoptions, new programs, curriculum development and 
improvement, innovative teaching methods, and other matters relating to the operation of the 
Wilmington Public Schools. 

e Wilmington Public Schools were in operation 180 days beginning September 3, 1969 and ending June 16, 
10. The Committee held twenty-four (24) regular meetings, seven (7) special meetings, and twenty (20) 
etings relating to collective bargaining, making a total of fifty-one (51) meetings for the year 1970. 

e Committee extends its sincere thanks to town officials, town departments, and to the citizens of 
Imington for their fine cooperation and assistance during the past year. 

WILMINGTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

PROJECTED ENROLLMENTS 1970-1978 SEPTEMBER 1970 



Year Births K 1 2 3 4 5 6 K-6 7 8 7-8 9 10 11 12 9-12 K-12 



1970-1971 


346 




520 


485 


487 


486 


451 


467 


2896 


438 


428 


866 


398 


340 


300 


242 


1280 


5042 


1971-1972 






5l5 


470 


485 


488 


473 


447 


2878 


469 


428 


897 


433 


363 


310 


282 


1388 


5163 


1972-1973 


298 




507 


462 


46 S 


486 


476 


469 


2868 


449 


459 


908 


433 


398 


332 


292 


1455 


5231 


1973-1974 


289 


530 


502 


458 


460 


469 


474 


472 


2835 
+530 
3365 


471 


439 


910 


465 


398 


363 


312 


1538 


5813 


1974-1975 


260 


522 


500 


455 


455 


461 


457 


470 


2798 
+522 
3320 


474 


461 


935 


444 


427 


363 


342 


1576 


5831 


1975-1976 


in 


520 


500 


455 


452 


456 


449 


452 


2764 
+520 
3284 


472 


463 


935 


467 


408 


389 


342 


1606 


5825 


1976-1977 


264 


520 


500 


455 


452 


453 


442 


445 


2747 
+520 
3267 


455 


461 


916 


470 


429 


372 


366 


1637 


5820 


1977-1978 


256 


520 


500 


455 


452 


453 


439 


439 


2738 
+520 
3258 


448 


445 


893 


467 


436 


391 


350 


1644 


5795 


1978-1979 




















443 


438 


881 


451 


430 


408 


365 


1654 


■k 


1975-1980 




















439 


433 


872 


443 


417 


398 


386 


1644 


•k 


1980-1981 




















437 


429 


866 


440 


409 


378 


375 


1602 




1981-1982 




















435 


427 


862 


435 


405 


370 


355 


1565 




1982-1983 




















432 


425 


857 


432 


398 


368 


348 


1546 


-k 


1983-1984 




















431 


423 


854 


436 


396 


363 


344 


1539 





■I' These figures are based on pupils already enrolled in the Wilmington Public Schools. 



63 



Superintendent of Schools 



I herewith submit the 1970 Annual Report as Superintendent of Schools. 

My appointment to the Supe rintendency was on March 5, 1970. I take this occasion to thank the Wilmingt 
School Committee for the opportunity of serving in this capacity. 

This report will be divided into the following categories: 



As Superintendent I presented a reorganization program to the School Committee which reached all areas 
the School Department. I was mindful as I approached this all-important subject that we should understai 
that we are now on the threshold of a new era in education just as we seem to be on the threshold of a new 
era in the sources and use of energy, in industrialization, in communication, in international relations, ; 
perhaps, in interplanetary communication. The reorganization plan, therefore, affected the following 
areas: 

A. Central Administration - The Assistant Superintendent of Schools - The job de scription at this 
level has changed to that of a curriculum position. It is his role to direct curriculum, grades 
1-12 and make recommendations to the Superintendent and School Committee regarding curricv 
needs, including additional personnel at all levels. He will organize and direct curriculum 



studies at all levels and with all departments. 

Business Manager - This new position was created to focus full-time attention to the all-impor 
area of finances. It will enable us to provide a further in depth analysis of school costs, bette: 
concentration in purchasing, long-range cost program by departments, and a total move in the 
direction of a Planned, Programmed, Budgeting System, otherwise known as P. P. B. S. 

Work Study Administrator - This position was restructured to a full-time position to better 
service an important segment of the school population. It assists the student who does not have 
the educational capacity to digest and control a full day academic program but who is capable o; 
handling a half day of academics and working on a job a half day or the equivalent. It also 
provides an opportunity for those who have left school to return and thus make a high school 
diploma a reality. It has proven a success, as there are at present a total of ninety-three (93)' 
pupils enrolled in this program. 



I 

II 
III 
IV 

V 
VI 
VII 



Reorganization 
New Appointments 
Elementary 
Intermediate 
High School 
Accreditation Status 
General Highlights 



I 



Reorganization 



64 



B. Reorganization - Elementary - At this level the reorganization dealt mainly with building assign- 
ments and additional administrators. The elementary school administrators were reassigned to 
provide, as much as possible, a principal for each large building. Full-time principals have been 
assigned to the following schools: Boutwell, Glen Road, Wildwood, Woburn Street and Shawsheen 
Ave. The only remaining district of schools under one principalship is the Central District which 
comprises Swain, Buzzell, Walker and Whitefield. In addition, part-time assistant principals 
were provided for the Woburn Street and Shawsheen Ave. Schools. The personnel filling these 
positions teach for one half the day and assist in administrative details during the remainder of the 
day. As these schools exceed 700 in enrollment, it was felt that this change was necessary. 

C. Reorganization - Intermediate - Again at this level the position of part-time Assistant Principal 
was created to assist in administrative details. The assistant principal teaches for a half day. 
Also, he acts as coordinator of pupil services in these schools. This affords the principal an 
opportunity to spend a greater amount of time in supervision of instruction and planning. 

D. Reorganization - High School - The basic change at this level was the creation of a new position 
entitled "Coordinator of Student Activities". This part-time position was an important step in the 
orderly strengthening and promoting of student activities. To date, close coordination with the 
Recreation Commission has been established and an activity program has been formulated. Thus 
far, there are fifty (50) activities which are educational, vocational, social, service, recre- 
ational and athletic in nature. It is our hope that involvement in these activities will have a carry 
over to the students in the future. 

E. Reorganization - Systemwide - The appointment of a full-time "Director of Family Living" was 
the highlight in this area. This director is responsible for family living programs already in 
effect, and education in the areas of Drugs, Tobacco and Alcohol. The Drug Program is being 
conducted in fcooperation with the Town Drug Committee. Teachers and students are being 
trained to assist in the vital area of Drug Education. In addition, there is close cooperation with 
the Advisory Committee which is comprised of clergy, physicians, and parents. 

II. New Appointments 

a result of the reorganization plan outlined, the following appointments have been made throughout the 
r 1970: 

Assistant Superintendent - Mr. Derek Little, former director of "Project Lighthouse, " a Title 
III project in the Cape Cod area fills this position. 

Business Manager - Mr. Jerry Houghton, former Assistant to the Superintendent in Middleboro 
is our new Business Manager. He filled this same position in Middleboro. 

Administrator - Work Study - Mr. Anthony DeLuca, former principal of North Intermediate fills 
this new position. He began his new duties in September. 

Part-Time Assistant Principals - Elementary - Mr. John Carr, Shawsheen Ave. and Mr. Joseph 
Connelly are the two new appointments at this level. Both formerly taught at the W. Intermediate. 

Part-Time Assistant Principals - Intermediate - Mr. Joseph Gilligan, West Intermediate and 
Mr. James Jordan, North Intermediate are the new part-time assistant principals in the above 
schools. Both formerly taught in the schools where they now hold these new positions. 

Coordinator of Student Activities - Mr. John Lynch was elected to this position. He is a math 
teacher in the high school. Presently, he teaches three classes per day and devotes the 
remainder of his time to his new position. 



65 



Director of Family Living - Mrs. Patricia Gagnon, a former English teacher in our system, is 
our new Director of Family Living. Mrs. Gagnon was a member of the basic committee who 
worked in developing this program during the last three years. 

III. Elementary 

The 1970 year saw a modification in the "Wednesday Afternoon Program". It has been re - structured in 
order that the four remaining days would not be extended beyond 3:00 p. m. As a result, the Wednesday 
dismissal, now is at 1:30 p.m. 

A transitional class was implemented this year in order to bridge the educational gap between first and 
second grade. This progressive and innovative program has sixteen students for this year. It is our hop 
that many of these youngsters will progress to grade three this year and totally avoid a repeat. The 
implementation of this program could be a step toward a continuous progress plan for students based on a 
philosophy appropriate to the individual child's needs. It takes a child from the level he has attained, gui 
and expands his opportunities so that he learns to his fullest and at a pace most beneficial for him. 

A class for the emotionally disturbed began at the elementary level. This class is a departure from othe 
classes of this type as it allows students to be involved in other classes throughout the day when possible. 

Mr. George Hesse was elected to the position of Principal of the Glen Road School. 



IV. Intermediate 

At the West Intermediate a change of scheduling to a seven period day allowed an activity period to be 
implemented. As a result, a wider variety of activities are offered to the students at this level. 

The Family Living Program which began in 1969 was continued at the West Intermediate and is scheduled 
for the North Intermediate during this school year. 

At the North Intermediate, Mr. William J. Fay Jr. replaced Mr. DeLuca as principal of that school. 

V. High School 

As indicated earlier an activity program was introduced at this level. This was made possible by adding 
an additional period on Friday, thereby affording one complete hour for the activity period during the day, 

A senior responsibility program was introduced whereby seniors are afforded the opportunity to decide he 
and where they will spend their free time. The Town Library is open to these students during the day as 
well as the School Library. 

The High School schedule had to be extended to a 7th period from 2: 15 - 3:05 p. m. due to the crowded 
conditions. We see this type of schedule change becoming greater until this area gets some relief in the 
way of a building program. 

Another change to assist the crowded conditions allows students who are scheduled for a first or last stud 
period to arrive late or leave early thus freeing rooms for classes during these times. 



66 



status of 1970 Graduating Class reveals the following breakdown: 



Percent to four year colleges and universities 
Percent to less than four year schools 
(including nursing and technical) 



33. 



8. 



Percent to further education 
Percent to service 
Percent to working forces 



41. 
11. 
48. 
100. 



ted below are the colleges, universities, technical schools and nursing schools to which our graduates 
:e been accepted for the fall. 

Less Than 4-Year Schools 



T State Jr. College 
?-ant and Stratton 
imdler School 
iimberlayne Jr. College 
titrol Data 

bt Coast Aero Tech. 
Iihm Jr. College 
sen Mt. Jr. College 
(Trade Shops Schools) 



Katherine Gibbs School 
Mass. Bay Community College 
Middlesex Community College 
Northampton Jr. College 
North Shore Community College 
Northern Essex Community College 
Tewksbury State Hospital School 
Wentworth Institute 



Four Year Colleges and Universities 



lerican University 


Pershing College 


lens College 


Plymouth State College 


rd College 


Purdue 


title y College 


Ricker College 


ston College 


Rhode Island School of Design 


oton University 


Smith College 


yant College 


State College At Bridgewater 


aV. Post College 


State College at Framingham 


ntral Connecticut 


State College at Fitchburg 


irk University 


State College at Lowell 


rmington State College 


State College at North Adams 


anklin Pierce College 


State College at Salem 


rham State College 


State College at Westfield 


innell College 


Suffolk University 


ron College 


Syracuse University 


ene State College 


Thiel College 


intucky Wesleyan College 


University of Bridgeport 


isley College 


University of Hartford 


vwell Tech. 


University of Maine 


iss. College of Art 


University of Massachusetts 


trrimack College 


University of Miami 


rravian College 


University of New Hampshire 


rtheastern University 


West Georgia College 


rthland College 


Wilkes College 



67 



VI. Acc reditation Status 



During the year 1970, Wilmington High School was visited by the accreditation committee of the New 
England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

The visiting committee report contains many commendations pointing to the strengths of the school. The 
staff had developed a comprehensive statement of philosophy and the stated objectives are commensurate 
with student needs. 

The report further emphasized the need to work toward the construction of adequate school facilities. Th 
was brought out by more than one sub-committee and if implemented would do much to resolve many of th 
recommendations made for the improvement of the school. 

In i960, Wilmington High School was voted a ten year membership. This year we were voted a five year 
membership. Two follow-up reports are due, one in 197Z, the other in 1975. If the town has not taken 
some specific action in providing new facilities, by the time the 1972 follow-up report is due, there is a 
strong possibility that the school will lose its accreditation according to the New England Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

Loss of accreditation would affect Wilmington students as they would have difficulty in obtaining acceptanc 
to colleges and universities regardless of their scholastic achievement. Also, it would have an affect on 
teacher recruitment programs. Accreditation is an area that is taken seriously by all public school 
systems, colleges and universities. 



Vn. General Highlights 



A. The pupil enrollment as of October 1, 1970 revealed the following: 



Grade ] 
Grade 2 
Grade 2 
Grade ^ 
Grade E 
Grade ( 
Grade " 
Grade i 
Grade S 
Grade ] 
Grade ] 
Grade ] 
Special 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 



508 
480 
508 
461 
461 
477 
468 
440 
350 
335 
294 
237 
77 



Total 



5, 096 



68 



B. The School Department personnel breakdown was as follows: 



Central Office Administrator 
Work Study Administrator 
Administrative Assistant 
Cafeteria Supervisor 
Executive Secretaries 
1 Part-time Exec. Secretary- 
Educational Secretaries 
Principals 
F\ill-time Teachers 
Librarians 

Part-time Librarians 
Permanent Substitutes 
Part-time Teachers 
Nurses 

Cooperative Students 
(Northeastern) 



s 



3 
1 
1 
1 
4 



1 part-time 



10 
10 



281 



4 
3 
2 
8 
3 
2 



TOTAL 



334 



Teacher Aides 



28 



C. Another innovative approach this year is the introduction of the Guided Self-Analysis System for 
Professional Development. GSA, as it is commonly called, was developed initially through the 
University of California at Berkeley by Dr. Theodore Parsons. The program has been designed 
specifically to assist practicing classroom teachers in their own efforts toward professional 
self-improvement. The Wilmington Public Schools, like other school systems in our 
Commonwealth, has a continuous need to improve the quality of instruction that it offers to its 
youth. It is the feeling of the School Committee, the School Administration and the Professional 
Improvement Committee of Teachers themselves that we can best improve the instructional 
capabilities of our total curriculum by making it possible for our teachers to become intense 
agents of change within their own classrooms. Furthermore, it is believed that this can only be 
accomplished to any satisfactory systemwide .degree through a planned program of self- 
improvement. This program is being implemented under the direction of the Assistant 
Superintendent of Schools. 



D. The per pupil cost for the period of July 1, 1969 to June 30, 1970 was $798. 69. 

closing, I would like to express my sincere thanks to the School Committee, Administrators, Staff, 
idents and parents for their fine cooperation during the year. 



69 



Shawsheen Valley Technical School 



From January until August, the Regional School Committee met on the second and fourth Tuesday of each 
month at the temporary District Office located at Z40 Cambridge Street, Burlington. After August, meeti 
were held in the School facility at 100 Cook Street, Billerica. Due to the myriad of details requiring act: 
by the District Committee, weekly meetings were held, starting May 5 until October. At that time, it Wc, 
voted to resume the regular meeting schedule. The membership and terms of office are as follows: 



Name of Member 

Mr. Fred Keough 
Mr. Joseph Rogers 

Mr. Kenneth Buffum 
Mr. Everett McCue 

Mr. Wallace Haigh 
Mr. John Murphy 

Mrs. Anthony Anderson 
Mr. Roy Curseaden 

Mr. Eugene Kritter 
Mr. Frank McLean 



Bedford 

Billerica 

Burlington 

Tewksbury 

Wilmington 



Term Expires 

1971 
1972 

1973 
197Z 

1973 
1972 

1973 
1971 

1972 
1973 



On April 1, an organizational meeting was held, at which time the following officers were elected: 
Mr. Kenneth Buffum, Chairman; Mr. Eugene Kritter, Vice-Chairman; Mr. Wallace Haigh, 
Secretary-T reasurer. 

In following a policy of providing an educational facility for all levels of students in the five towns, the 
Committee approved recommendations submitted by Mr. Joseph Bastable, Director of Guidance, for the 
establishment of a pilot program geared for some of the students who are presently in special classes of 
five towns. 

Approval was also given for the printing of a brochure that was developed by Mr. Bastable and is to be us 
for occupational information to be distributed to interested students and their parents. 

During this year, periodic reports were made by the architect, equipment consultants, clerk of the work 
and the technical coordinator, as well as the Superintendent-Director, on the progress of the school proj' 

In order to expedite the finances, Mrs. Frances Dugan was appointed to the position of Assistant TreasuJ 
and Bookkeeper. 

70 



. hiring school personnel, the Teaching Personnel Subcommittee, consisting of Mr. John Murphy, 
lairman, Mrs. Anthony Anderson, and Mr. Joseph Rogers, assisted Superintendent Wolk in reviewing 
alifications of candidates for the various teaching positions. Also, the Non-teaching Personnel 
immittee, Mr. Fred Keough, Chairman, Mr. Eugene Kritter, Mr. Joseph Rogers and Mr. Roy Curseaden 
ve been quite active in interviewing candidates for the positions of Business Manager, Maintenance 
pervisor, and other non-teaching personnel required. 

L May 27, 1970, the corner stone laying ceremony took place. Invited guests included: Rev. Ellwyn 
chols, St. Anne's Episcopal Church, North Billerica; Senator Ronald MacKenzie; Mr. Walter J. Markham, 
rector. Bureau of Vocational Education; Mr. John Clancy, Manager of Personnel, R. C.A. , Burlington; 
Ite Representative Fred Cain; Mr. John Madden, Assistant Vice President, Itek, Burlington; Reverend 
eldon Kelly, St. William's, Tewksbury; as well as members of the School Committee, Superintendents 
iSchools and various town officials. It was a very impressive ceremony. A contest was held in the five 
wns in connection with the corner stone laying ceremony for an article to be written by one of the high 
hool students on predictions for the 21st century. A number of responses were received. The article 
iged the best was written by Michelle Lombard of Wilmington High School, who was a guest at the 
remony, as were her parents. 

)nsiderable time was spent by the Committee in reviewing the equipment requirements and checking bids 
it were submitted, as well as awarding of bids to responsible vendors. 

1 Jiily 15, the New England Merchants National Bank arranged for the sale of the second half of the bond 
3ue necessary to finance the construction of the school. Bids were opened and the bonds were awarded 
Merrill, Lynch, Pierce, Fenner and Smith, at 6 1/2%. 

le preliminary budget was developed by Mr. Rackemann, Business Manager, after intensive discussions 
th the Superintendent and various teachers in order to determine what their requirements would be for 
3 next year. Arrangements were made in the budget to institute summer courses, as well as provisions 
c the evening school classes to start in September of 1971. 

lis has been the busiest year in the existence of the District Committee. Activity was at a peak since 
ambers of the Committee were involved in appointments of teachers, approval of supplies and equipment, 
well as being responsible for the various details that are essential for the proper operation of the school. 

2 were extremely pleased with the excellent cooperation on the part of members of the Advisory 
ammittee from industry, the press, the teachers, the students and their parents, so that all together 
hool got off to a very satisfactory start. 

> Chairman, I have found that it has been a great source of satisfaction to be associated with this project 
iiich I know will be an asset to the five towns, and I am most appreciative of the time and effort given by 
many people to assist us in this great undertaking. 



71 



Shawsheen Valley Technical School 



Report of Superintendent-Director 

Introduction 

The year 1970 has been a most significant one. We have seen our project become an actuality with the 
opening of our new building on September 14. 

Facilitie s 

Periodic meetings were held with the architect, the Clerk of the Works and equipment consultants for the 
purpose of evaluating the progress of our project and to establish priorities in order to insure that the 
school will be properly equipped at the time of opening. Approval was received by Mr. Arthur Cameron, 
inspector representing the State Department of Public Safety, for the opening of school in September. Sii 
all of the facilities were not completed, special permission was received from the Commissioner of Edu- 
cation to operate the school on a limited basis for such time until we could go into a full program. On 
Monday, October 26, the interior work was advanced to the point where we found it was possible to go ont 
a full day schedule. As time went on, various facilities were completed and phased in so that by the end 
1970, the entire school was substantially completed. 

The responsibility for furnishing a school of this type is quite complex and we were most fortunate in hav 
Mr. Anthony Bazzinotti, as Technical Coordinator, to do the necessary research and develop the specifi- 
cations for the equipment and furniture necessary for the school. We acquired five pieces of equipment f 
the Machine Shop from government surplus. Three came from a depot in Burlington, N. J., and the othe^ 
two from Terre Haute, Indiana. We felt that with this equipment there would be a savings of over $24, 00 
Working closely with Mr. Bazzinotti were the equipment consultants and members of the various advisor\ 
committees who reviewed our proposals and made it possible to firm up the requirements for proper 
equipment in each area. 

Personnel 

Both the Non-teaching Personnel Committee and the Teaching Personnel Committee were active in de- 
veloping guide lines and facilitating the hiring of necessary personnel for the school. Notices of the vaca: 
cies were sent out to the Department of Education, as well as publicity given at the annual meeting of the 
Massachusetts Vocational Association. Also, teacher training classes at the Greater Lawrence Regional 
School, as well as Waltham Vocational School, were visited and interested candidates were made aware c 
the opportunities at our school. In accordance with the recommendation of Mr. Walter J. Markham, 
Associate Commissioner of the Division of Occupational Education, teachers were hired as of August 1, i 
that they would have an opportunity to get their shops and classrooms ready for the incoming students. 
This also gave them an opportunity to develop their courses of study. Mr. Markham, whose department 
pays 50% of the teachers' salaries, approved this action. All appointed members of the staff reported to 
the school building on August 3. A series of programs was arranged for orientation of all teachers. 

During the time we operated on a condensed schedule, arrangements were made for our teachers to visit 
other schools in order to benefit by their methods of operations and courses of study. 



72 



idents 



rly in the year, Mr. Bastable, Director of Guidance, arranged for school assemblies for students in 
Grades 8 and 9 of all the five towns. He used the Department of Education film "World of Change", as 
11 as special visual aids publicizing the school. Special display boards were also set up in public 
raries of the five towns. In addition, a series of parents meetings were arranged so that interested 
I rents would have an opportunity to meet with Mr. Bastable and myself relative to opportunities at the 
jaool, as well as admission procedures. A total of 627 student applications were received. We accepted 
proximately 170 for Grade 9 and 170 in Grade 10, for a total of 340 students. On Friday, June IZ, all 
ident candidates were notified of the acceptance or non-acceptance. The criteria for acceptance was 
sed on a number of factors developed by the Guidance Department. All students were given a personal 
erview, as well as being required to take the Differential Aptitude Test. Every effort was made to have 
lair representation for each of the five towns. Also, a series of meetings was held with the special class 
ichers of the five towns in order to develop guide lines for training of special class students as a pilot 
ogram. There was considerable enthusiasm about this project. A special class teacher was hired and 
; admission class of 12 students started here on the opening day of school. We have been quite pleased 
th the progress of this group and feel it has excellent possibilities. 

part of the educational process, students were taken on field trips so they could become familiar with 
; way business and industry operates. 

ilinary Arts students, as part of their training program, started the operation of a guest dining room, 
sals were prepared by the students and served to teachers, office staff and guests. The consensus of 
inion is that the meals were outstanding in their quality. This operation has brought many favorable 
mments . 

hool Activities 



le first annual parents night was held at our school on September 10. There was an excellent response, 
th over 400 parents present. Parents visited classrooms and shops, and later enjoyed refreshments in 
3 cafeteria, prepared by the students of the Culinary Arts Department. Quite a number have volunteered 
: serve on a parents council, which we hope to activate early in 1971. 

lie first student activity was in the form of a school dance, which was held on December 18. It was quite 
ccessful and, both the members of the facility who served on the advisory committee, and those students 
lo served on the dance committee, were quite pleased with the results. 

1 December 19, a social was held in the school cafeteria, during which time the members of the School 
Dmmittee had an opportunity to meet with members of the staff and their husbands and wives. 

1 November 23, representatives of Lane Motors of Bedford, and Northeastern Distribution Center for 
jlkswagen of Wilmington, made a presentation of a Volkswagen engine and accessory parts to the auto- 
otive department of our school. 

r. Robert Wheaton, Regional District Director for Ford Motor Company in the Detroit area, and a former 
ssident of Woburn, was responsible for the presentation to the school as a gift a 1970 Ford engine, 
smplete differential assembly, automatic transmission and torque converter. 

1 June 22, I attended some of the meetings of a summer conference on Vocational education which was 
kid at Westfield State College. On December 4 through 9, I attended the annual convention of the American 
iDcational Association, which was held in New Orleans. During the year, I was present at various 
;arings at the State House on bills pertinent to vocational technical education and to our regional school. 



73 



The school superintendents of the five towns served as an educational advisory committee and, as such, 
held meetings in March and December. The March meeting was attended by the five school superintende 
as well as Mr. Bastable and myself. A discussion was held relative to coordinating our regional school 
the local schools, and to report on admissions. At the December meeting, the school superintendents h; 
an opportunity to tour the building and then had lunch, which was prepared and served by the students in i 
Culinary Arts Department. 

This has been a most satisfactory year. Everyone involved in the project, students, teachers, members 
the School Committee, advisory committee members and others, have been most cooperative in helping 
make our school a very pleasant place in which to learn and work. I feel that we are off to a good start a 
hope we can continue. To all of those who were responsible for the development of this project, I know t 
will have a sense of satisfaction in seeing the final results. 

Total Operating Budget 
Total Capital Budget 

Total 1971 Requirement 

Interest Accrued from Daily Interest Accounts 

and Certificate of Deposits 
Public Law 90-576 for Construction Costs 

from period 1/1/70 to 6/30/70 
Public Law 90-576 for Proposals Submitted 

for Fiscal Year 1971-1972 
School Building Assistance Grant 

Anticipated 4/1/71 
T own As se s sment due December, 1970 
Operating Balance (Estimated) for 1970 
Surplus Revenue 

Total on Hand 

To Be Raised and Appropriated 



$1, 130, 076. 
750, 385. 


00 
00 


$1, 880, 461. 


00 


$ 78,342. 


83 


160, 500. 


00 


271, 804. 


00 


302, 000. 


00 


63, 479. 


72 


32, 978. 


45 


80, 000. 


00 



$ 989, 105. 00 
$ 891,356.00 



Town 



Operating ** Capital ** 

Enrollment* % Apportionment Contribution % Apportionment Contribution Contribut 



Bedford 24 7.14% $ 39,458.55 

Billerica 108 32.14% 177,618.72 

Burlington 67 19.94% 110,196.56 

Tewksbury 85 25.30% 139,818.10 

Wilmington 52 15.48% 85,548.78 

Total 336 100.00% $552,640.71 
* Grades 9 & 10 as of October 1, 1970. 



10. 00% $ 33, 871. 53 $ 73, 330 

34.62% 105,521.67 283,140. 

21. 47% 65, 462. 15 175, 658., 

27.24% 83,051.63 222,869. 

16.67% 50,808.31 136,357., 

$338,715.29 $891,356. 



Apportionment of Operating and Capital Costs according to Section IV, Paragraphs D and E, (page 10) 
of an "Agreement between the towns of Bedford, Billerica, Burlington, Tewksbury, and Wilmington, 
Massachusetts, with respect to the establishment of a Regional Vocational High School District". 



74 



Town Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 7, 1970 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

;ETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
:d Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
airs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium Saturday, the Seventh of March, A. D. 1970 at 
t5 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m., and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m., for 
! election of Town Offices: 

nCLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: One 
iectman for the term of three years; Two Members of the School Committee for the term of three years; 
! Moderator for the term of one year; One Member for the Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational/Technical 
lool District Committee for the term of three years; One Member for the Wilmington Housing Authority for 
! term of five years; and One Member for the Wilmington Housing Authority for the unexpired term of two 



I are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Imington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and meet 
ITown Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, in said Town of Wilmington on Saturday, the 
urteenth day of March, A. D. 1970 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

i accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan 
'9:45 a.m., as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and on a motion by Mr. Harold E. Melzar it 
5 voted to dispense with further reading of said Warrant. 

5 ballot boxes were publicly examined by the Warden, the Moderator, Town Clerk, the Police officer on duty 
i the ballot-box clerks. Three ballot machines were found to be empty and the register on each machine 
licated 00000. Each ballot machine was then locked and the keys given to the Police Officer in charge. 

5 Election Officers were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. 

J Warden signed a receipt for 7000 ballots, the number said to be contained in the boxes of ballots which 
ce delivered to him. The ballots were then delivered to the ballot clerks. 

i Polls Were declared open at 10:00 a.m., and they were declared closed at 8:00 p.m. by the Warden, 
sre were Two Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirteen (2813) ballots cast. 

L of the ballots cast were sorted, counted, recorded and declaration thereof made as by law is directed, 
i were for the following, namely: 

LECTMEN - Three Years 



tirs. 



ected 



George W. Boylen, Jr., Nine hundred twenty 

Carl A. Backman, Jr., One thousand four hundred fifty-five 

Paul G. Godzyk, Two hundred seventy-one 

Felice P. Vitale, One hundred thirty-five 

Blanks, Thirty-two 

Total vote. Two thousand eight hundred thirteen 



920 
1455 
271 
135 

32^ 

2813 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three Years 

Elected William J. Fay, Jr., One thousand six hundred and twenty-seven 1627 j!r 

Elected Diana C. Imbimbo, One thousand seven hundred forty-five 1745 |H 

Nancy H. Clark, One thousand five hundred eleven 1511 |li 

Blanks, Seven hundred forty 740 m 

Others, Three 3 

Total vote. Five thousand six hundred twenty-six 5626 

MODERATOR - One Year 

Elected John M. Callan, Two thousand four hundred and forty-two 2442 

Blanks, Three hundred sixty-three 363 

Others, Eight 8 

Total vote. Two thousand eight hundred thirteen 2813 

WILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY - Five Years 

Elected Charles F, Lounsbury, Two thousand three hundred forty-one 2341 

Blanks, Four hundred sixty-nine 469 y 

Others, Three 3_ I 

Total ^ote. Two thousand eight hundred thirteen 2813 A 

WILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY - Two Year Unexpired Term i 

Elected Florence E. Borofsky, One thousand two hundred sixty-two 1262 

Pearl H. Hersom, One thousand one hundred eighty-six 1186 

Blanks, Three hundred sixty-four 364 

Others, One - 1_ 

Total vote. Two thousand eight hundred thirteen 2813 

SHAWSHEEN VALLEY REGIONAL VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE - Three Years 

Elected Frank H. McLean, Two thousand three hundred seventy-six 2376 

Blanks, Four hundred thirty-five 435 ; 

Others, Two 2 

Total vote. Two thousand eight hundred thirteen 2813 



All the elected officials present were immediately sworn to the faithful performance of their duties by tl) 
Town Clerk. All other elected officials were sworn in on Monday of the following week. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - MARCH 14, 1970 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The adjourned /jinual Town Meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan at 1:45 p.m., 
there being a quorum present. 

Father Joseph W, Leahy led the meeting in prayer. Mr. John Faulkner, Veterans' of Foreign Wars member lec 
the meeting in the Salute to the Flag. 

The Moderator read the Warrant as far as and including the calling of this meeting. At this point, 

Mr. James Banda made a motion that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the Warrant and take eau 

article up and make reference to the same by number. This was so voted. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear the reports of Committees and act thereon. No reports were offered. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectni 
to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue for the financial years beginning January 1, 1970 and 
January 1, 1971 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any 
note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in accordance with the provisions of Gend 
Laws Chapter 44, Section 17, or take any action relative thereto. 



ICICLE 3. (continued) Motion by Mr. Bruce MacDonald: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town 
[sasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money in anticipation of the revenue for the 
: lancial years beginning January 1, 1970 and January 1, 1971 in accordance with the provisions of General 
.•js, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
, ar in accordance with the provisions of General Laws Chapter 44, Section 17." Voted unanimously. 

iTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds and appropri- 
zB a sum of money for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation 
: 2reto, 

'tion by Mrs. Wavie M. Drew: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
;1,472.99 for the purpose of paying unpaid bills of previous years." Voted unanimously, 

■TICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries of 
;is several Town officers and departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
:ansfer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

"tion by Mrs. Jeanne C. Pedersen: "I move that the several and respective sums as recommended by the Finance 
:[ranittee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriated for the purposes set 
[rth in Article 5, each item to be taken up separately and voted on, subject to amendment." Motion voted 
animously. 

'CORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TAXATION: 
iNERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries $ 1,500.00 

Expenses (Mr. Sterling C, Morris moved to amend to) 6,300.00 

$ 7,800.00 

Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries $ 3,900.00 

Expenses ' 750.00 

$ 4,650.00 

!Registrars of Voters 

Salaries $ 3,500.00 

Expenses 4,000.00 

$ 7,500.00 

Finance Committee 

Salaries $ 100.00 

Expenses 3,200.00 

i $ 3,300.00 

Town Manager 

Salaries $ 22,794.00 

Expenses 800.00 

$ 23,594.00 

Industrial Promotion $ 800.00 

Town Accountant 

Salaries $ 17,619.00 

Expenses 525.00 

Capital Outlay 600.00 

$ 18,744.00 

[Treasurer 

Salaries $ 15,487.00 

Expenses 1,400.00 

Tax Title Foreclosures. ... 15,000.00 

$ 31,887.00 

Collector 

Salaries $ 13,533.00 

Expenses 1,600.00 

$ 15,133.00 



77 



Town Clerk 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Board of Assessors 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Town Counsel 

Salaries (Retainer) .... 
Expenses (Court Appearances) 

Town Hall 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Planning Board 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Misc. Contractual Services. 
Professional Services ... 

701 Project 

Planning Consultant .... 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT .... 



PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police 

Salaries - Chief (Motion to amend to $15,000 lost) 

Lieutenant 

Sergeants 

Patrolmen 

Traffic (Policewomen) 

Clerk 

Miscellaneous Details 

Police Dog Officers 

Vacations 

Sick Leave 

Paid Holidays 

Expenses (Voice vote lost. Standing vote Yes-188 No-133 voted to amend to 
Capital Outlay 

Constable 

Salaries 

Fire 

Salaries - Chief 

Lieutenants 

Privates 

Call Fire & Ambulance (Amend to $16,500 lost) 

Vacations 

Sick Leave 

Paid Holidays 

Expenses (Amendment to $13,050 lost) 

Capital Outlay (Amendment to $9,170 voted Yes - 213 No - 118) 



78 



LVil Defense 

Salaries $ 500.00 

Ex pense s 550.00 

$ 1,050.00 
)g Officer 

Salaries (Amendment t:o $2,500 voted) $ 2,500.00 

Expenses (Amendment to $1,300 voted) 1,300.00 

$ 3,800.00 
ijilding Inspector 

Salaries $ 14,994.00 

Expenses 705.00 

Capital Outlay 300.00 

$ 15,999.00 
jard of Appeals 

Salaries $ 500.00 

Expenses 125.00 

$ 625.00 

;aler of Weights & Measures 

Salaries $ 1,000.00 

Expenses 100.00 

$ 1,100.00 

PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY $ 650,812.00 

.IC WORKS 
jwn Engineer 

Salaries - Town Engineer $ 11,851.00 

Other Salaries 8,263.00 

Expenses 1,900.00 



$ 22,014.00 



i ghway 

Salaries - Superintendent . $ 11,150.00 

Other Salaries 103,200.00 

Expenses (Mr. Richard V. Barry moved to amend to $53,800. Voted) 53,800.00 

Capital Outlay 4,100.00 

Maintenance Projects - 

Drainage (Mr. Morris amend, to $25,000. Yes-155 No-131 Voted 25,000.00 

Sidewalk Program (Voted to pass over and take no action - to reconsider failed 
Yes-55 No-193) 

Public Street Lights 42,000.00 

Road Machinery - Expenses 21,500.00 

Chapter 90 Construction 9,450.00 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 2,500.00 

Chapter 80 Maintenance 

Salaries 4,700.00 

Expenses 8,300.00 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries (Mr. Morris moved to amend to $30,000; so voted) 30,000.00 

Expenses 48,000.00 

$ 363,700.00 
ree Warden 

Salaries (Motion to amend to $11,449 lost) $ 10,449.00 

Expenses 8,200.00 

Stch Elm Control 

Salaries 12,277.00 

Expenses 2,400.00 

rpsy Moth Control 

Salaries 9,000.00 

Expenses 2,330.00 

$ 44,656.00 



79 



Salaries $ 45,81;' 

Expenses (Motion by Mrs. Pedersen that the sum of $18,100 be appropriated for Cemetery 
Expenses, $5,195 to be raised by transfer from "Sale of Cemetery Lots Account" and 

the balance of $12,905 by taxation.) 12,90' 

Capital Outlay 1,12( 

Parks 

Salaries 3,00i 

Expenses 5,00i 

$ 67,83' 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS $ 498, 20' 

HEALTH & SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salaries $ 33,76i 

Expenses 2,95( 

Capital Outlay 60( 

Hospital & Medical Care 3,50( 

Garbage Collection 24,14' 

Town Dump 24,00( 



TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION $ 88, 96^ 



Recessed at 5:20 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. same evening. Reconvened at 7:20 p.m. there being a quorum present. 



CHARITIES & VETERANS AID 
Veterans' Aid & Benefits 

Salaries $ 6,411 

Expenses 17( 

Assistance, Veterans , 70,00( 

Capital Outlay 35( 

TOTAL CHARITIES & VETERANS' AID $ 76,931 



MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
School Maintenance & Operations 

Salaries $ 

Expenses (Town Manager amendment to $58,200 was lost) 

Fuel Heating 

Capital Outlay 

$ 409, 07( 

School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses $ 6,60( 

Capital Outlay 2,72( 

$ 9,32C 

Town Buildings Maintenance 

Expenses $ 21,99f 

Capital Outlay 2,111 

$ 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS $ 

LIBRARY 

Salaries $ 

Expenses (Motion by Mr. Barry: "I move that the sum of $28,800 be appropriated for Library 
Expenses, $3,118.75 to be raised by transfer from the "State Aid to Public Libraries 

Account" and the balance of $25,681.25 be raised by taxation." 

TOTAL LIBRARY $ 



80 



REATION DEPARTMENT 

alaries $ 29,423.00 

xpenses 8,170.00 

apital Outlay 750.00 

AL RECREATION $ 38,343.00 

(MANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

alaries $ 1,500.00 

xpenses 250.00 

ontractual Services 12,250.00 

AL PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE $ 14,000.00 

SERVATION COMMISSION 

xpenses $ 4,190.00 

lOGL DEPARTMENT 

otal Salaries (Motion by Mr. John Brooks: "I move that the School Department-Total 
Salaries Account in the amount of $2,650,097.00 be reduced by $79,889.00 of available 

Public Law 874 and Public Law 85-864 funds for a total to be raised by taxation of. . . $2,570,208.00 

otal Non-Salary Items 416,154.00 

AL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT $2,986,362.00 

ATIONAL TRAINING 11,500.00 

lONAL VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 40,400.00 

.LASSIFIED & RESERVE 

nsurance & Bonds $ 66,394.00 

eserve Fund 50,000.00 

lue Cross-Blue Shield & Group Life (Mrs. Pedersen: "I move that the sum of $60,000 be 
appropriated for Blue Cross, Blue Shield and Group Life, $2,143.00 to be raised by 
transfer from the "Group Insurance Dividend Account" and the balance of $57,857 to 

be raised by taxation." Voted 57,857.00 

local Transportation 8,965.00 

lown Report 2,000.00 

ewer Maintenance 1,000.00 

/y-Law Study Committee 500.00 

ippraisals 10,000.00 

raining 6t Conferences - In State 3,500.00 

Out of State 2,775.00 

.'eterans's Retirement 11,742.00 

1970 Salary Adjustments and Additional Costs 82,623.00 

l.dditional Employees by Department 

Public Buildings 9,180.00 

Engineering 6,500.00 

Highway (Amendment by Mr. Morris to $4,470 Yes-265 No-49 voted 4,470.00 

Police (Amendment by Mr. Paul Lynch to $10,444 lost by voice vote. Seven doubted the 

vote Yes-229 No-134 - both standing votes carried 10,444.00 

Fire 8,000.00 

Collective Bargaining Negotiator (Town Manager amend to $3,000 voted) 3,000.00 

iAL UNCLASSIFIED 6t RESERVE $ 338,950.00 



81 



MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools $ 687,330 

General Government (Motion by Mrs. Pedersen: "I move that the Maturing Debt & Interest, 
General Government Account be appropriated in the amount of $74,853 to be raised by 
the transfer of $85 from the 'Accrued Interest Sale of Bonds* Account, and a balance 

of $74,768 be raised by taxation" 74,768 

Water (Motion by Mrs. Pedersen: "I move that the sum of $105,353 be appropriated for 
Maturing Debt & Interest - Water, $87,414 to be raised by transfer from Water 

Available Surplus, and the balance of $17,939 to be raised by taxation." Voted .... 17,939 j 

Interest on Anticipation Notes and Authentication fees (Motion by Mrs. Pedersen: "I move 
that the sum of $55,000 be appropriated for "Interest on Anticipation Notes and 
Authentication Fees $29,978 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash, and the balance 
of $25,022 to be raised by taxation. Amendment by Mr. Joseph F. Courtney, "I move 
to amend the motion relative to the Budget line item designated as "Interest on 
Anticipation Notes and Authentication Fees" by providing that the entire amount 
therefor, $55,000 be appropriated and raised by taxation." Amendment lost by 

voice vote. Main motion voted.). ................ .. 25,022 



TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST $ 805,059, 

Budget concluded at 9:45 p.m. 

TOTAL VOTED BY BUDGET - TAXATION $6,270,114.25 

TRANSFERS 127,933.75 

$6,398,048.00 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000,00 for the observance 
of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have 
charge of said observances or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Mrs. Drew to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,000.00 to effect the purpose of 
Article 6. So voted. 

Mr. Fred F. Cain made a motion to take up Article 52 out of order at this time. Lost by voice vote. 

Mr. Vitale made a motion to take up Article 33 out of order at this time. Lost by voice vote. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to grant an extension of time to the By-Law Study Committee estc 
lished under Article 31 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 8, 1969, for the purpose of completing the 
assigned study of "The By-Laws of the Inhabitants of Wilmington", and which committee shall further prepc 
and submit a report of its study to the Selectmen not later than the next Annual Town Meeting, or do any- 
thing in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Mr, James F. Banda moved the adoption of the above Article 7. Finance Committee approved. Motion adopts 
Mr. Banda asked to reconsider article ^1^52 at this time. So voted. 

Mr. Cain: "I move that the Town vote to pass over Article 52 and take no action." Finance Committee 
recommends approval of this motion. Motion voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to require that a detailed drainage plan be prepared by a buildei 
land owner, developer or their agent and approved by the Board of Health, Town Engineer and Town Building- 
Inspector at least 30 days prior to any alteration of a wetland or do anything else in relation thereto. 
Request of Conservation Commission. 



Motion by Mr. Ottati: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Building By-Law by adding to Division No. 6 
Excavating - the following: 'A detailed drainage plan will be prepared by a builder, land owner or devel 
and approved by the Board of Health, Town Engineer and Town Building Inspector at least 30 days prior to 
alteration of any property which causes the displacement of surface water.'" Finance Committee recommen 
approval, noting that this article will be amended at the Town Meeting in order to word it in a more work 
manner. 



82 



?ICLE 8. (continued) 

, Roy P. McClanahan on motion:". . .something like this is needed - article does not say how to enforce it 
urge we vote the article down and bring back next year in zoning or some other more suitable form." 

; Buzzell on motion: "...local legislation does not fit this into any proper by-law.... it should be in- 
ided in zoning. .. .there should be a hearing." 

ilerator ruled the Town was notified and it is clearly indicated that it is properly before us. We are not 
:ing on legality or illegality and we may vote on it. Standing vote taken: Yes-231 No-28 Motion 
•ried. 

, Vitale made a motion to take up Article 33 out of order at this time. Lost. 

, Bruce MacDonald moved to adjourn to 12:30 p.m. next Saturday and meet in the Gymnasium. Motion lost. 

James D. Tighe notified the meeting that he would ask reconsideration of the Reserve Fund at the next 
ourned Town Meeting. 

riCLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
! the following described parcel of land for conservation purposes as described in G, L. Chapter 40, 
;tion 8C, as amended, and to determine how said appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by 
msfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to see if the Town will vote to 
:horize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, receive as a gift or execute an option for said 
•pose, a certain parcel of land being shown as part of Lots 1 and 16 of Assessor's Map 75 and part of 
:s 7C, 15 and 16 of Assessors' Map 85, now or formerly owned by Dimitri and Mary McKaba, Frederick A. 
:th, Antonio J. Tambone, Gennaro & Saverina D'Urso and Edward Goldman, and more particularly described as 
Hows: Bounded Northwesterly by Woburn Street; Northeasterly by land now or formerly of Pleasant Homes, 
;., and Frederick A. Smith; Easterly by State Highway Route 1-93; Southerly and Southwesterly by land now 
formerly of Dimitri & Mary McKaba; containing 20 acres more or less; and the land so acquired shall be 
ier the jurisdiction and control of the Conservation Commission, or do anything in relation thereto, 
(uest of Conservation Commission. 

tion by Cynthia B, Williams: "I move to pass over Article 9 and take no action." So voted. 

riCLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
; the following described parcel of land for conservation purposes as described in G. L. Chapter 40, Sec- 
)n 8C, as amended, and to determine how said appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by trans- 
■ from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to see if the Town will vote to authorize 
! Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, receive as a gift or execute an option for said purposes, 
certain parcel of land being shown as lot 11 of Assessors' Map 101, now or formerly owned by Esquire 
lies. Inc. and more particularly described as follows: Bounded Northwesterly by Lot 36 and Lot 37 and 
iirlotte Road shown on Esquire Estates Plan dated August 6, 1957, recorded in the Middlesex North District 
i;istry of Deeds, Book of Plans 89, Plan 84, Sheets 1 and 2; Northeasterly by Martins Brook; Southerly by 
tamed brook; and Southwesterly by land now or formerly of Thrush; containing 3.5 acres more or less; and 
! land so acquired shall be under the jurisdiction and control of the Conservation Commission, or do any- 
ng in relation thereto. Request of Conservation Commission. 

lion by Ursula M. Leahy: "I move to pass over Article 10 and take no action." So voted. 

juorum was questioned at this time. A standing count was made and showed more than 353 voters in the hall. 

riCLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
; the following described parcel of land for conservation purposes as described in G. L, Chapter 40, 
:tion 8C, as amended, and to determine how said appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by 
msfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to see if the Town will vote to 
ihorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, receive as a gift or execute an option for 
)d purposes, a certain parcel of land being shown as Lot 100 of Assessors' Map 101, now or formerly owned 
Herbert and Nellie C. Thrush and more particularly described as follows: Bounded Northeasterly by land of 

Town of Wilmington and land now or formerly of Esquire Homes, Inc.; Southeasterly by Gowing Brook and 
:id now or formerly of David and Wigo Anderson, Northwesterly by land now or formerly of Rounds Realty 
ist and other land of the Town of Wilmington; containing 4 acres more or less; and the land so acquired 
111 be under the jurisdiction and control of the Conservation Commission, or do anything in relation 
rreto. Request of Conservation Commission, 



83 



ARTICLE 11. (continued) 

Motion by Ursula M. Leahy to adopt Article 11 as laid out above and to effect said article the sum of 
$1,200.00 be raised by taxation and appropriated for said purpose. Finance Committee approved $1,200.00 t 
taxation. Motion voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 12, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acqui 
the following described parcel of land for conservation purposes as described in G. L. Chapter 40, Sectioi 
as amended, and to determine how said appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer froi 
available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Self 
men to purchase, take by eminent domain, receive as a gift or execute an option for said purposes, a certi 
parcel of land being shown as part of Lot 1, Assessors Map 102, now or formerly owned by Charles E. and 
Alma E. Rounds (formerly railroad right of way) and more particularly described as follows: Bounded Weste 
by Woburn Street 89 feet; Northeasterly by land of Town of Wilmington 2,535 feet; Easterly by Martins Pone 
Brook; Southwesterly by land of the Town of Wilmington, James J. & Helen Durkee, Leslie A. & Alice E. Durl 
and Charles E. & Alma E. Rounds 2,582 feet; all distances being more or less; containing 4.9 acres more oi 
less; and the land so acquired shall be under the jurisdiction and control of the Conservation Commission, 
do anyting in relation thereto. Request of the Conservation Commission. 

Motion by Cynthia B. Williams to pass over Article 12 and take no action. So voted. 

ARTICLE 13, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acqu 
ing the following described parcel of land for conservation purposes as described in G, L. Chapter 40, j 
Section 8C, as amended, and to determine how said appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by 
transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to see if the Town will vote to autV 
i ze the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, receive as a gift or execute an option for said 
purposes, a certain parcel of land being shown as Lots 21 and 2lA, Assessors' Map 71, now or formerly own«f 
by Irwin M, & Doris M. Squibb, more particularly described as follows: the land in Wilmington and being 
shown as Lots 1 and 2 on "Plan of land in Wilmington, Mass., December 20, 1962, surveyed for Robert Clark' 
Northeastern Engineering Associates, Burlington, Mass., said plan recorded in the Middlesex North District 
Deeds plan Book 97 Plan 137B; bounded Easterly by West Street, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) fr 
Southerly; still by West Street, as shown on said plan, fourteen and 30/100 (14.30) feet; Easterly: again 
West Street, as shown on said plan, by three distances measuring respectively, twenty-two and 24/100 (22.', 
feet, one hundred six and 45/100 (106.45) feet and forty-two and 05/100 (42.05) feet; Southerly: by Suncn 
Avenue, as shown on said plan, one hundred and 88/100 (100.88) feet; Westerly: by Lots numbered 69, 68 an( 
measuring respectively one hundred thirty-six and 30/100 (136.30) feet, seventy-nine and 18/100 (79.18) ft 
twenty-three and 25/100 (23.25) feet, twenty-two and 36/100 (22,36) feet and eighty and 16/100 (80,16) fe. 
Said Lot 1 containing 31,120 square feet, more or less, and Lot 2 containing 23,560 square feet, more or : 
and the land so acquired shall be under the jurisdiction and control of the Conservation Commission, or d< 
anything in relation thereto. Request of Conservation Commission. 

Motion by Mr. Arthur W. Bureau: "I move to pass over Article 13 and take no action. The Finance Committei 
approves $4,000.00, Vote taken by voice and lost. 

Motion by Mr. Miceli: "I move to lay Article 13 on the table. Vote taken by standing: Yes-243 No-6 So 
voted. (This temporarily postpones this article.) 

Mr. Belbin moved to adjourn until next Monday at 7:30 p.m. Motion withdrawn. Voted, 

Mr. Banda moved to adjourn to next Saturday, March 21, 1970 at 1:00 p.m. at the High School Gymnasium, 
Church Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts. 

Mr. Sullivan served notice to reconsider the Police Chief's salary at the next adjourned Town Meeting, 
Motion to adjourn voted unanimously. Adjourned at 11:00 p.m. 

There were 522 voters checked in for the afternoon session and 420 checked in for the evening session. 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 21, 1970 
The Moderator, Mr. Callan, called the meeting to order at 1:20 p.m, there being a quorum present. 



84 



on by Mr. James Miceli: "I move that we remove Article 13 from the table." Voted. 



CLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquiring 
following described parcel of land for conservation purposes as described in G. L. Chapter 40, Section 8C, 
mended, and to determine how said appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from 
lable funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Select- 
to purchase, take by eminent domain, receive as a gift or execute an option for said purposes, a certain 
el of land being shown as Lots 21 and 21A, Assessors' Map 71, now or formerly owned by Irwin M. & Doris M. 
bb, more particularly described as follows: the land in Wilmington & being shown as Lots 1 and 2 on 
n of land in Wilmington, Mass., December 20, 1962, surveyed for Robert Clark", Northeastern Engineering 
ciates, Burlington, Mass., said plan recorded in the Middlesex North District Deeds plan Book 97 Plan 137B; 
ded Easterly by West Street, as shown on said plan, one hundred (100) feet; Southerly; still by West Street, 
hown on said plan, fourteen and 30/100 (14.30) feet; Easterly; again by West Street, as shown on said plan, 
hree distances measuring respectively, twenty-two and 24/100 (22.24) feet, one hundred six and 45/100 j i 

45) feet and forty-two and 05/100 (42.05) feet; Southerly by Suncrest Avenue, as shown on said plan, one ' , 

red and 88/100 (100.88) feet; Westerly: by Lots numbered 69, 68 and 67 measuring respectively one hundred 
ty-six and 30/100 (136.30) feet, seventy-nine and 18/100 (79.18) feet, twenty-three and 25/100 (23.25) | / 

, twenty-two and 36/100 (22.36) feet and eighty and 16/100 (80.16) feet. Said Lot 1 containing 31,120 j . 

re feet, more or less, and Lot 2 containing 23,560 square feet, moi-e or less, and the land so acquired s 
1 be under the jurisdiction and control of the Conservation Commission, or do anything in relation thereto, 
est of Conservation Commission. 



on by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
50 for the purpose of acquiring the following described parcel of land for Conservation purposes; as des- 
ed in G, L. Chapter 40, Section 8C as amended, and further to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by 
ent domain or receive as a gift for said purposes, a certain parcel of land bounded and described above in 
cle 13, and the land so acquired shall be under the jurisdiction and control of the Conservation 
ission." Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

Paul Lynch moved the reconsideration of the Police Chief's salary. Vote taken by voice and it was declared 
by the Moderator. 

CLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of certain 
els of town-owned land, as shown on the Wilmington Assessor's map, to which reference is hereby made for 
re particular description, as follows: Map No. 50 Lot Numbers 104A, 58, 32, 36, and 38 to the Conserva- 

Commission for all purposes as are intended in General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C or as it may be here- 
r amended, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Conservation Commission. 

Ottati, member of the Conservation Commission, moved the adoption of Article 14 as laid out above, 
nee Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously. 

CLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of certain 
els of town-owned land, as shown on the Wilmington Assessor's map, to which reference is hereby made for 
re particular description as follows: Map Number 1 Lot Number 9, Map Number 12 Lot Number 18, Map Number 

the Conservation Commission for all purposes as are intended in General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C or 
t may be hereafter amended, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Conservation Commission. 

ion by Mr, Arthur W. Bureau to pass over Article 15 and take no action. Motion voted unanimously. 

CLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, management and control of certain 
els of town-owned land, as shown on the Wilmington Assessor's Map, to which reference is hereby made for 
re particular description as follows: Map #10 Lot numbers 33, 35, 28A ; Map #17 Lot numbers 8 and 9; 
'#30 Lot number 38; Map #61 Lot Number 8B; Map Number 69 Lot Numbers UlA, 108, 106 and 107; Map #79 Lot 
er 15a, Map Number 81 Lot Number 15; Map #89 Lot Number 2; Map #102 Lot Number 4 to the Conservation 
ission for all purposes as are intended in General Laws Chapter 40, Section 8C or as it may be hereafter 
Ided, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Conservation Commission. 

lon by Mr. Arthur W. Bureau that the Town adopt the above Article 16 as laid out in said article. Finance 
ittee approved. Motion voted unanimously. 

CLE 17. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 
'appropriate for the purchase of 2 vehicles for the use of the Police Department, and authorize the sale 
urn-in of two vehicles presently used by the Police Department, or do anything in relation thereto, 
est of the Town Manager. 



I 



I 



85 



ARTICLE 17. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 
$5,199.00 for the purchase of 2 vehicles for the use of the Police Department, and at the discretion of t 
Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of 2 vehicles presently used by the Police Department." Finan 
Committee approved. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 18. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available fun 
and appropriate for the purchase and equipping of a Brush Fire Truck for the Fire Department, and authoriz 
the sale or turn-in of the 1949 Chevrolet Brush Fire Truck, or do anything in relation thereto. Request 
the Town Manager, 

Motion by Mr. Morris to raise and appropriate the sum of $18,993.00 for the above purpose as set out in 
Article IS. Finance Committee disapproved. Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 19. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available fun: 
and appropriate for the purchase of a vehicle for the use of the Fire Chief and authorize the sale or tur 
of the present vehicle used by the Fire Chief, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town 
Manager. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,696,5'j 
for the purchase of a vehicle for the use of the Fire Chief, and at the discretion of the Town Manager ' 
authorize the sale or turn-in of the present vehicle used by the Fire Chief." Finance Committee approved 
Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 20. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from avai-lable fun 
and appropriate for the purchase and equipping of a sedan or station wagon for the use of the Engineering 
Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

Motion by Mr. Morris to pass over Article 20 and take no action so voted. 

ARTICLE 21. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funi 
and appropriate for the purchase of a Sweeper for the use of the Highway Department, and authorize the sa 
or turn-in of a 1966 Elgin Pelican Sweeper, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Mana 
Mr, Morris moved to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $11,705 for the above purpose in Article 
Finance Committee recommended disapproval. Vote taken by voice and declared lost. Seven rose to doubt t 
vote. Vote taken by standing: Yes-99 No-lll Motion lost, 

ARTICLE 22, To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available fun 
and appropriate for the purchase of a 3^ ton Dump Truck with 5-7 cubic yard body for the use of the Highw 
Department, and authorize the sale or turn-in of the 1965 Chevrolet 3% ton truck, and/or a 1957 Walters 
Snow Fighter Chassis & Cab only, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $7,617.0 
for the purchase of a 3^ ton dump truck with 5-7 cubic yard body for the use of the Highway Department, a 
authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1957 Walters Snow Fighter Chassis and Cab only. Finance Committee 
approved. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 23. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available fun 
and appropriate for the purchase of a 3/4 ton Pick-up with utility body for the use of the Highway Depart; 
and authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1964 3/4 ton Ford Pick-up, or do anything in relation thereto. Rec 
of the Town Manager. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,994.0 
for the purchase of a 3/4 ton Pick-up with utility body for the use of the Highway Department, and author; 
the sale or turn-in of a 1964 3/4 ton Ford Pick-up. Finance Committee approved. Motion so voted, 

ARTICLE 24. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funs 
and appropriate for the purchase of a 3/4 ton Pick-up for the use of the Highway Department, and authoriz 
the sale or turn-in of a 1965 Chevrolet 1/2 ton pick-up, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
the Town Manager, Motion by Mr, Morris to pass over Article 24, and take no action. So voted. 



86 



:ICLE 25. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 
1 appropriate for the purchase of a 2h ton Dump Truck with 3/5 cubic yard body for the use of the Highway 
)artment, and authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1953 GMC Dump Truck, or do anything in relation thereto. 
|uest of the Town Manager. 

ion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $6,365.00 
■ the purchase of a 2% ton Dump Truck with 3/5 cubic yard body for the use of the Highway Department, and 
(horize the sale or turn-in of a 1953 GMC Dump Truck." Finance Committee approved. Motion so voted. 

'ICLE 26. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 

appropriate for the purchase of a Snow Loader for the use of the Highway Department, or do anything in 
lation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ion by Mr. Morris to pass over Article 26 and take no action. So voted. 

'ICLE 27. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 

appropriate for the purchase of a 3/4 ton Truck four-wheel drive and a two-way radio for the use of the 
■e Department, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $3,723.00 

the purchase of a 3/4 ton Truck, four-wheel drive and a two-way radio for the use of the Tree Department." 
lance Committee approved. Motion so voted. 

ICLE 28. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 

appropriate for the purchase of a 3^ ton Rack Body Dump Truck, with a 15,000 lb. winch and a two-way 
io, for the use of the Tree Department, and authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1966 Chevrolet ton Dump, 
do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ion by Mr. Morris: "I move the Town vote to purchase a new winch to be installed on the existing truck, 

for this purpose to raise and appropriate $950.00 by taxation." Finance Committee approved. Motion so 
ed. 

ICLE 29, To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 

appropriate for the purchase of a 2% ton Dump Truck with Body for the use of the Cemetery Department, and 
horize the sale or turn-in of a 1955 1^ ton International Dump Truck, or do anything in relation thereto, 
luest of the Town Manager. 

ion by Mr, Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $6,032.00 

the purchase of a 2\ ton Dump Truck with Body for the use of the Cemetery Department, and authorize the 
e or turn-in of a 1955 1^ ton International Dump Truck." Finance Committee approved. Motion so voted. 

ICLE 30. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, 

appropriate for the purchase of a 1% ton Stake Dump Truck for the use of the Public Buildings Department, 
do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $6,912.00 

the purchase of a 1% ton Stake Dump Truck for the use of the Public Buildings Department." Finance 
anittee approved. So voted, 

ICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to accept General Laws, Chapter 147, Section 17B v^iich relates to 
ive day and forty-hour week and compensation for overtime service it, the Police Department based on 
laight time. Request of the Town Manager. 

ion by Mr, Morris to adopt the above General Law as laid out in Article 31. Finance Committee approved. 
:er a great deal of debate a voter moved the question, Yes-216 No-12 Vote carried. Main motion lost 
'Voice vote, 

ICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept Section I7G of Chapter 147 of the General Laws of Massa- 
isetts which compensates Police Officers time and one-half for over a forty hour week, or do anything in 
lation thereto. Request of James Cuoco et al. 



87 



ARTICLE 32. (continued) 

Motion by Mr, Simon Cutter: "I move that the Town vote to accept Section 17G of Chapter 147 of the Gener; 
Laws of Massachusetts, added by the Acts of 1969, Chapter 872, Section 1, which compensates Police Office 
time and one-half for over a forty-hour week." Finance Committee disapproved. 

Amendment by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to accept Chapter 872, Section 1 of the Acts of 1969 
the General Laws of Massachusetts which compensates Police Officers time and one-half for over a forty he 
week, and that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $15,000.00 to provide the m 
sary funds for this article. Motion to amend voted. Main motion as amended voted. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $750.00 under the authority c 
Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, for the purpose of providing suitable quarters fc 
the William F. Tattersall Chapter #106, Disabled American Veterans, located in Wilmington, Massachusetts, 
or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the D. A. V. 

Motion by Mr. Bruce MacDonald that the town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $750.00 for the 
purpose as laid out in Article #33. Finance Committee disapproved. Voice vote taken and the Moderator ! 
declared he was in doubt. Vote taken standing: Yes-215 No-86 Motion carries. ! 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 for the purpose of 
newing under the authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of the 
American Legion Clubhouse, Inc., in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Post #136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Americai 
Legion. 

Motion by Mrs. Wavie M. Drew, that the town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $750.00 for the 
purpose as laid out in Article #34, Finance Committee now approved. Motion so voted. i 

ARTICLE 35, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 for the purpose of 
renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended, the lease of Veteran; 
Foreign Wars' Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the Nee-El! 
worth Post #2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, or do anything in relation theretcl 
Request of the V.F.W. | 

Motion by Mr, Carl A. Backman, Jr, that the town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $750,00 foi 
the purpose as laid out in Article #35. Finance Committee now approved this article. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acqi 
ing the following described parcel of land for school purposes and determine how said appropriation shai: 
be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further 
see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen: (A) to purchase, take by eminent domain, or receive 
as a gift for said purposes a certain parcel of land owned by the Wilmington Grange Hall Corporation des-' 
cribed as follows: Beginning at a stake and stones on Wi Idwood Street at land now or formerly of Elizabe 
Howard: thence Southwesterly by said Howard's land, one hundred seventy (170) feet to an angle; thence a 
little njore Westerly - one hundred thirty (130) feet to a stake at a corner of land now or formerly of \ 
James Ee Kelley; thence Northwesterly - by said Kelley's land, ninety-two and 4/10 (92.4) feet to the enci 
of a ditch; thence a little more Northerly - by said ditch, one hundred eighty-four and 8/10 (184,8) feet 
more or less to an angle; thence a little more Westerly - by said ditch, sixty and 3/10 (60.3) feet to a 
stake at the comer where two ditches meet; thence Northwesterly in a straight line to a corner of a fen< 
at other land of said Kelley; thence Northeasterly - by and with last mentioned land and other land now <|a 
formerly of Nichols, three hundred forty-one (341) feet, more or less to a stake on the westerly line of 
Wi Idwood Street; thence Southeasterly - by and on the line of said Street, four hundred forty (440) feet, i 
more or less, to the stake at the point of beginning. Excepting, however, from the above-mentioned premij 
so much thereof as was conveyed by the Wilmington Grange Hall Corporation to Charles Roessler by deed dati 
April 25, 1927, recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 749, page 254. Also I 
excepting, however, from the above-described premises so much thereof as was conveyed by the Wilmington 1/ 
Grange Hall Corporation to the Town of Wilmington and/or as was taken by the Town of Wilmington by eminei i 
domain; (b) To convey to the Wilmington Grange Hall Corporation as additional and complete consideration 
certain parcel of Town-owned property described as follows: Easterly - by Main Street, three hundred foi 
three (343) feet, more or less Northerly - by land now or formerly of Montague, four hundred (400) feet, 
more or less; Southerly - by land now or formerly of George Griffith, four hundred (400) feet, more or le; 
Westerly - by land now or formerly of Northeast Live Stock Co., three hundred forty-three (343) feet, moj 



,'ICLE 36. (continued) 

less; or however otherwise said parcel may be bounded, measured or described, or do anything in relation 
ireto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

:ion by Mr. James Mi cell: "I move that the Town transfer the sum of $10,000.00 from Account #973 originally 
iropriated from taxation by Article 70 of the adjourned Annual Town Meeting of March 15, 1969, and 
)ropriate said $10,000.00 for the purpose of acquiring the following described parcel of land for school 
•poses and authorize the Selectmen: (a) to purchase, take by eminent domain, or receive as a gift for said 
•poses a certain parcel of land owned by the Wilmington Grange Hall Corporation described as follows: 
;inning at a stake and stones on Wildwood Street at land now or formerly of Elizabeth Howard; thence 
ithwesterly by said Howard's land, one hundred seventy (170) feet to an angle; thence a little more 
iterly - one hundred thirty (130) feet to a stake at a corner of land now or formerly of James E. Kelley; 
!nce Northwesterly - by said Kelley' s land, ninety-two and 4/10 (92.4) feet to the end of a ditch; thence 
.ittle more Northerly-by said ditch, one hundred eighty-four and 8/10 (184.8) feet, more or less to an 
;le; thence a little more Vfesterly - by said ditch, sixty and 3/10 (60.3) feet to a stake at the corner 
ire two ditches meet; thence Northwesterly - in a straight line to a corner of a fence at other land of 

d Kelley; thence Northeasterly - by and with last mentioned land and other land now or formerly of Nichols, 
•ee hundred forty-one (341) feet, more or less to a stake on the westerly line of Wildwood Street; thence 
itheasterly - by and on the line of said Street, four hundred forty- (440) feet, more or less, to the stake 

the point of beginning. Excepting, however, from the above-mentioned premises so much thereof as was 
iveyed by the Wilmington Grange Hall Corporation to Charles Roessler by deed dated April 25, 1927, recorded 

the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds, Book 749, Page 254. Also excepting, however, from the 
ive-described premises so much thereof as was conveyed by the Wilmington Grange Hall Corporation to the 
'n of Wilmington and/or as was taken by the Town of Wilmington by eminent domain; (b) To convey to the 
imington Grange Hall Corporation as additional and complete consideration a certain parcel of Town owned 
)perty described as follows: Easterly - by Main Street, three hundred forty-three (343) feet, more or 
ss Northerly - by land now or formerly of Montague, four hundred (400) feet, more or less; Southerly - by 
Id now or formerly of George Griffith, four hundred (400) feet, more or less; Westerly - by land now or 
rmerly of Northeast Live Stock Co., three hundred forty-three (343) feet, more or less; or however otherwise 
Id parcel may be bounded, measured or described." Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously, 

fICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Andover Street, from the 
-therly end of the 1958 layout a distance of 1,350 feet, more or less. Northerly, as recommended by the 
inning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82 as amended 
lating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways, and Specific Repairs 
ireon), which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein is hereby 
erred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of 
nent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of 
s Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from 
iiilable funds, by borrowings, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for the payment 
lany damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, therefor or do 
■thing in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ion by Mr. Carl A. Backman, Jr. that the town adopt Article 37 and raise by taxation and appropriate the 
I of $2,500.00 for the purpose as laid out above in Article 37. Finance Committee approved. Motion voted 
mimously . 

I'ICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town Way, the layout of Bond Street, from Shawsheen 
nue a distance of 790 feet, more or less. Northeasterly to a dead end, as recommended by the Planning 
:.rd and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisons of the General Laws (Chapter 80 as amended, relating 
:the Assessment of Betterments), which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with 
ms therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
;take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to 
!ect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxa- 
m or by transfer from available funds, by borrowings, or otherwise, for the purposeof constructing said 

and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other 
cements, therefor or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ion by Mr. Bruce MacDonald to raise money by taxation and by borrowing to effect the above article was 
mimously lost. 



89 



ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town Way, the layout of Floradale Avenue, from 
Burlington Avenue a distance of 625 feet, more or less. Southeasterly to a dead end, as recommended by th' 
Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 80, as amended 
relating to the Assessment of Betterments), which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and wh 
with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowings, or otherwise, for the purpose of 
constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope ease 
ments and other easements, therefor or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectme 

Motion by Mr. James Banda: "I move that the Town vote to accept as a Town Way, the layout of Floradale 
Avenue, from Burlington Avenue a distance of 625 feet, more or less. Southeasterly to a dead end, as recq 
mended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 
as amended, relating to the Assessment of Betterments), which layout is filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk, and which, with plans therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to author 
the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easement 
as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, and to raise and appropriate the sum of $23, OC 
Dollars for the purpose of constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the ta 
of land and slope easements and other easements; $1,150 of said sum is to be raised by taxation, and that 
the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums in 
amount of $21,850 and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44 of the General Laws." 
Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town Way, the layout of Fordham Road from the No' 
Reading Town Line a distance of 3,800 feet, more or less^ Northerly to a dead end, as recommended by the 
Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82 as amended 
relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways, and Specific Repair,, 
Thereon), which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which with plans therein is hereby 
referred to for more particular description; and authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Emii 
Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this; 
Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowings, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for the paymen 
any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, therefor or do any 
in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Mrs. Wavie M. Drew: "I move that we pass over Article 40 and take no action." Voted to take no 
action. i 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town Way, the layout of Hopkins Street from 
Shawsheen Avenue a distance of 3,100 feet, more or less. Southwesterly to the Billerica Town Line, as rec 
mended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chap. 82 ; 
amended relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways, and Specifi , 
Repairs thereon), which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein is j, 
hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by ri , 
of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purp ; 
of this Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfe 
from available funds, by borrowings, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for the p 
ment of any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, therefor o,, 
do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Mr. Miceli to raise by taxation and by borrowing to effect the above article. Motion lost - i 
Yes-58 No-247. i 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Kenwood Avenue, from Wob j 
Street a distance of 530 feet, more or less. Southeasterly to Redwood Terrace, as recommended by the Plan 
Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82 as amended relating I 
the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways, and Specific Repairs Thereon), | 
which layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which with plans therein is hereby referred tol 
more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain si, 
land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article, ani 
to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available fund ;i 
by borrowings, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for the payment of any damages ' 



90 



riCLE 42. (continued) 

suiting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, therefor or do anything in 
lation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

tion by Mr, Backman, that the Town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $100.00 to effect the 
ove Article 42. Finance Committee approved. Voted unanimously. So declared by the Moderator. 

riCLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way, the layout of Redwood Terrace, from 
nwood Avenue a distance of 645 feet, more or less. Southwesterly to a dead end, as recommended by the 
anning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82 as amended 
lating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways, and Specific Repairs 
areon), vrtiich layout is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein is hereby 
ferred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of 
inent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of 
is Article, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from 
ailable funds, by borrowings, or otherwise, for the purpose of constructing said way and for the payment 

any damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, therefor or do 
ything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

tion by Mr. Miceli that the Town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $100.00 to effect the pur- 
se of the above Article 43. Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the 
derator. 

TICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, by taxation, by transfer 
om available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, for the construction of West Street in accordance with the 
yout of said West Street from Lowell Street to the improved section as laid out by the Selectmen under the 
ovisions of General Laws, Chapter 82 and for land acquisition, or do anything in relation thereto. Request 
the Board of Selectmen. 

tion by Mrs. Drew: "I move that the Town vote for the construction of West Street in accordance with the 
yout of said West Street from Lowell Street to the improved section as laid out by the Selectmen under the 
ovisions of General Laws, Chapter 82, and authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent 
main such land, slope and drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of the 
tide, and that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $38,000 for the purpose of payment of 
y damages resulting from the taking of land and slope easements or other easements; $1,900 of said sum to 
raised by taxation, and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized 
borrow a sum or sums in the amount of $36,100 and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by 
apter 44 of the General Laws," Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by 
e Moderator, 

TICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquir- 
g the following described parcel of land for recreational purposes and determine how said appropriation 
all be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, and 
rther to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or re- 
ive as a gift for said purposes, a certain parcel of land bounded and described as follows: Southwesterly 

Union Street, one hundred (100 feet; Northwesterly by Lot 23, about seventy (70) feet; Northeasterly by 
Iver Lake, about one Hundred (100) feet and Southeasterly by Lot 26, about seventy (70) feet. All said 
undaries, except the water line, are determined by the Land Court to be located as shown on subdivision 
an 8860B, Sheets one (1) and two (2) drawn by C. H. Gannett, C. E. dated November 1924, as approved by the 
urt, filed in the Land Registration Office, a copy of a portion of which is filed with Certificate of 
tie 2893, and said land is shown as Lots twenty-four (24) and twenty-five (25) on said plan. 

: much of the above-described land as is included within the limits of the ways as shown on said plan is 
bject to the rights of all persons lawfully entitled thereto in and over the same; and to any and all rights 

the public in the use of said Lake as a great pond, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the 
ard of Selectmen. 

tion by Mr. MacDonald - moved the adoption of the above Article 45 and to effect the same that the Town 
ise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $1,500 for the purpose of acquiring the above-described parcel 

land for recreational purposes. Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by 
a Moderator, 



91 



ARTICLE 46. To see if Che Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acqui 
the following described parcel of land for recreational purposes and determine how said appropriation shal 
raised whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; and further to se 
the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift, fo 
said purposes, a certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon consisting of several parcels and bound 
and described as follows: 

Parcel 1 . Beginning at the Northeast corner of said lot at a stake, and running Southwesterly on a 
road now called Grove Avenue, thirty-five (35) feet to another stake and land now or formerly of 
C. D. Wild; thence turning and running Northwesterly on land of said Wild, seventy-five (75) feet, 
more or less, to a stake and ditch and land of the Union Ice Company; thence turning and running 
Northeasterly on land of said Union Ice Company, forty-four (44) feet and four (4) inches to a 
stake and other land of C. D. Wild; and thence turning and running Southeasterly on said other land 
of said Wild, ninety-one (91) feet and five (5) inches to the point of beginning. Said premises 
are subject to the rights of passage as referred to in the title records. Said premises are parts 
of lots 124 and 125 on plan recorded with Book of Plans #6 of the Middlesex South District Registry 
of Deeds, 

Parcel 2 . Beginning at a point at the Northeast corner of the premises on Grove Avenue, formerly 
called Silver Lake Street, thence running Southerly on Grove Avenue, fifty (50) feet to a stake; 
thence turning and running Westerly by land now or formerly of Wild, fifty-six (56) feet to another 
stake and a ditch and land of the Union Ice Company; thence turning and running Northwesterly on 
said ditch and land of said Union Ice Company, fifty-three and 1/3 (53 1/3) feet to another stake 
and land of the Silver Lake Literary Association; thence returning and running Easterly by the last 
named land, seventy-five (75) feet to Grove Avenue and the point of beginning. Containing 3784.83 
square feet of land. 

Parcel 3. 



(a) Beginning at a point at land now or formerly of the Silver Lake Literary Association and Grove 
Avenue, fifty-eight (58) feet to the corner of the second parcel hereafter described; thence 
Northwesterly by said parcel, sixty-one (61) feet to Silver Lake; thence Southwesterly by the shore 
of the said Lake, ninety-six and 5/10 (96.5) feet to land or formerly of the Union Ice Company; 
thence Southeasterly ninety-one (91) feet by land of said Union Ice Company and of said Literary 
Association to said Grove Avenue and the point of beginning. 

(b) Beginning at the Northeasterly corner of the first described parcel on Grove Avenue; thence 
Northeasterly by said Avenue, thirty (30) feet to a corner of other land now or formerly of Sherzi ; 
thence Northwesterly by said other land now or formerly of Sherzi, fifty-eight (58) feet to Silver 
Lake; thence Southwesterly by said Lake, six (6) feet to the northerly corner of the first des- 
cribed parcel; thence Southeasterly sixty-one (61) feet by said first parcel to Grove Avenue and 
the point of beginning. 

(c) Beginning at the Northeasterly corner of said second parcel on said Grove Avenue and thence 
Northeasterly on said Avenue, fifty-four (54) feet to land now or formerly of Barker; thence 
Northwesterly by land now or formerly of said Barker, thirty-seven (37) feet to said Silver Lake; 
thence Southwesterly by the shore of said Lake, sixty-four (64) feet, more or less, to the corner 
of said second parcel; thence Southeasterly by said second parcel, fifty-eight (58) feet to said 
Grove Avenue and the point of beginning. 

Meaning and intending to describe that certain parcel of land described in Deeds recorded at the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds Book 1006, Page 585, Book 1006, Page 586 and Book 1029, Page 256 or howevi 
otherwise said parcel may be bounded, measured or described; or do anything in relation thereto. Request i 
the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Mr. Mi cell: "I move that the Town transfer the sum of $32,000 from Account #974 originally appro; 
ated by the transfer from the sale of Town=owned lands account in the sum of $19,259.77, and by taxation ii: 
the sum of $12,740.23 by Article 71 of the Adjourned Annual Town Meeting of March 15, 1969, and appropriati. 
said $32,000 for the purpose of acquiring the above-described parcel of land for recreational purposes; antiL 
further to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift for said purpos 
a certain parcel of land with the buildings thereon consisting of several parcels and bound and described 
in above Article 46." Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderai 



92 



ICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to place upon the official ballot at the next biennial or annual or 
cial town election, the question of whether all local mass transportation service in the Town of Wilmington 
uld be discontinued; or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ion by Mr. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to place upon the official ballot at the next biennial or 
ual or special town election, the question of whether all local mass transportation service in the Town of 
mington should be discontinued." Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by 
Moderator. 

ICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the following resolutions concerning the rights of the 
n of Wilmington to exercise "home rule" or do anything in relation thereto: 

"The Honorable Governor Francis W. Sargent and Members of the Massachusetts Great and General Court. 
Gentlemen: 

The Town of Wilmington, by an affirmative vote taken during the regular Town Meeting of March 21, 1970 
hereby petitions the Massachusetts Great and General Court to respect the financial plight of the 
cities and towns by rejecting all legislation which would place added costs, directly or indirectly, 
on the municipalities without providing for local acceptance or for funding by other than local 
taxation. The Town of Wilmington further petitions that the Legislature do everything in its power 
to implement further the concept of 'home rule', and to make meaningful the rights of municipal 
employers and employees to bargain collectively without imposition of state-wide legislation which 
affects, directly or indirectly, the agreements reached." Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ion by Mr. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to adopt the following resolutions concerning the rights of 

Town of Wilmington to exercise 'home rule' (as laid out in Article 48). Finance Committee approved, 
ed unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen in the name of and on behalf of the Town 
release and convey to Jackson Brothers, Inc., a 25 foot right of way described in a deed from Herbert C. 
rows to the Town of Wilmington and recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds Book 1268, 
e 37, dated September 3, 1954, and further to see if the Town will vote to accept a 40 foot right of way 

easement as shown on a plan dated January 5, 1970 by the Wilmington Engineering Department, a copy of 
ch is on file with the Town Clerk, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Board of Selectmen. 

ion by Mr. Backman that the Town adopt the above article #49. Finance Committee approved. Voted 
tiimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to give a confirmatory deed to the 
tefield Association Incorporated at Wilmington, Mass. to correct an error in a prior deed from the Town of 
mington dated April 4, 1955, recorded in Book 1289, Page 574, in which the grantee was incorrectly des- 
bed as Whi tefield Association, Inc., said deed relating to a certain parcel of land with the buildings 
reon situated in Maple Brook Park in said Wilmington and being lots numbered 183, 184 and 185 on a plan of 
le Brook Park drawn by Silverman Engineering Co., dated April 17, 1911 and recorded in Middlesex North 
trict Registry of Deeds, Book of Plans 28, Plan 67, containing 7871 square feet of land more or less; or 
anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

ion by Mr. Miceli that the Town adopt the above article #50. Finance Committee approved. Motion voted 
nimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

f ICLE 51, To see if the Town will vote to accept and receive as a gift for conservation purposes subject 
'i the care, custody management and control of the Conservation Commission from Joseph F. Troisi, Jr., et ux, 
' ertain parcel of land situated in Wilmington and being shown as Lot 13 on Plan of Land in Wilmington dated 
iiuary 20, 1964, K. J, Miller Co., C. E. duly recorded with the Middlesex North Registry of Deeds in Book of 
"ins 99, Plan 170 bounded and described as follows: Northeasterly by Shawsheen Avenue, in two courses, a 
'i al of 220.87 feet; Southeasterly by lot 12 as shown on said plan, 182.92 feet; Southwesterly by other land 
1 Jackson Brothers, Inc., 125 feet, more or less as shown on said plan; and Northwesterly by center line of 
Iwsheen River, as shown on said plan. Containing together 30,000 square feet, more of less, according to 
id plan. Being part of deed from Ruth C. Staples dated December 7, 1963 and recorded with said Deeds Book 
(3, Page 42; or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Conservation Commission. 



93 



ARTICLE 51. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. Bureau that the Town adopt the above Article #51. Finance Committee approved. Motion vote' " 
unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. " 



ARTICLE 52. Take up and acted upon after Article 7. 

ARTICLE 53. To see whether the Town will appropriate the sum of $200,000.00 or any greater or lesser sum 
aid of the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority for defraying acquisition and operating costs of the Urban 
Renewal Project in the Town designated as the Eames Street Industrial Park of Wilmington, as authorized b; 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 121B, Section 20, and to determine how any such appropriation shall bi 
raised, whether by taxation, by transfer of funds, by borrowing or otherwise and if by borrowing to autho: 
the issuance of bonds or notes of the Town therefor, and to take any action incidental to or connected wi 
the foregoing matters or any of them. Request of the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority. 

Motion by Mr. Robert F. Leahy: "I move that the following motion be adopted: That there is hereby appropr 
the sum of Two Hundred Thousand ($200,000.00) dollars in aid of the Wilmington Redevelopment Authority fo 
defraying to the extent authorized by Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 12IB Section 20, acquxsition ani 
operating costs of the Urban Renewal Project within "he Town designated as the Eames Street Industrial Pa; 
Wilmington, it being hereby determined that said sum is necessary for said purposes and that said appropr 
tion shall be in addition to any sums that may have been heretofor appropriated for the benefit of, paid ( 
to or agreed by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to be paid over to said Wilmington Redevelopment Authorf 
for such purposes; that to meet said appropriation the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen is 
authorized to borrow at one time or from time to time the sum of Two Hundred Thousand ($200,000,00) dolla: 
under and pursuant to said Chapter 121B Section 20, and any other enabling authority, but subject to apprc 
by the Emergency Finance Board (as required by Section 22_ of said Chapter 121B) each issue of such bonds ( 
notes to be in such amount, to have such date, mature in such annual installments not exceeding twenty ye^^ 
from its date, subject to the provisions of this vote, said Section 20 and the applicable provisions of 
Chapter 44 of Massachusetts General Laws, as shall be determined by the Treasurer with the approval of th( 
Selectmen." Finance Committee approved. Vote taken by standing: Yes-256 No-1. Motion carries, 

ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to accept General Laws Chapter 41, Section lllL, Vacations of 
Certain Police Officers and Fire Fighters after twenty years service, or do anything in relation thereto. 
In any city or town in which the provisions of section one hundred and eleven D apply and which accepts Ll 
section all members of its regular police or fire force may after twenty years of service be granted a va( 
tion of five weeks without loss of pay. By petition. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: I move that the Town vote to accept General Laws Chapter 41, Section lllL, Vacatioi 
of Certain Police Officers and Fire Fighters after twenty years service, and that the Town vote to raise 1 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $1,500.00 for this purpose," Finance Committee disapproved. Motion \ 
declared lost by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of money apportioned to the Town in accoi 
ance with Chapter 768 of the Acts of 1969 tor the purpose of completing an approved highway project on 
Shawsheen Avenue pursuant to the provisions of said Act, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of t|i 
Board of Selectmen. |i 

Motion by Mr. MacDonald: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $4,959,55 and that to meet £i 
appropriation transfer the sum of $4,959.55 apportioned to the Town in accordance with Chapter 768 of the 
Acts of 1969 for the purpose of completing an approved highway project on Shawsheen Avenue pursuant to the: 
provisions of said Act." Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of reconstruction, 
maintenance and repair of highways and bridges, and to meet said appropriation transfer the said sum from' 
proceeds received or to be received from the State under Section 5 of Chapter 768 of the Acts of 1969, 
Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Mr. Carl A, Backman, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $14,878,65 for tt| 
purpose of reconstruction, maintenance and repair of highways and bridges and that to meet said appropriate 
transfer the sum of $14,878.65 from the proceeds received or to be received from the State under Section 5 
Chapter 768 of the Acts of 1969." Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously. 



94 



'ICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to authorize and direct the Selectmen to appoint a committee of 
'e for the purpose of conducting a study of the problems of drug dependency and related problems in the 
fn of Wilmington and including the preparation of a recommended program and the implementation to combat 
; same and which committee shall further prepare and submit a report of its doing to the Selectmen and 
ibers of the Board of Health not later than the next Annual Town Meeting; and further to see if the Town 
1.1 vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of accomplishing the same; or do anything 
relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

cion by Mr. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to authorize and direct the Selectmen to appoint a committee 
five for the purpose of conducting a study of the problems of drug dependency and related problems in the 
m of Wilmington and including the preparation of a recommended program and the implementation to combat 
1 same; and which committee shall further prepare and submit a report ot its doing to the Selectmen and 
ibers of the Board of Health not later than the next Annual Town Meeting; and further that the Town vote to 
ise and appropriate $5,000 by taxation for the purpose of accomplishing same," Finance Committee approved. 

^ndment by Mr. John Brooks: "I move the motion be amended to insert the words 'and to the School Committee' 
line seven after the words 'Board of Health'. Motion to amend voted. 

;ond amendment by Mr. Bachman: "I move to add after the amended words 'School Committee', and report at 
ithly intervals to those boards and committees, in addition to reporting not later than the next Annual 
m Meeting. Second amendment voted. Motion to close debate voted unanimously. Main motion together with 
■ two amendments voted unanimously. 

, Belbin moved to adjourn for supper. He withdrew his motion so that one more article could come before 
i meeting before we recessed. 

riCLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to submit to the General Court 
accordance with Section 7, Chapter 42 General Laws as amended, a proposal to change the Town Line between 
Lmington and Burlington as established by Chapter 2, Acts of 1730, incorporating Wilmington and again in 
^pter 74 of the Acts of 1798 incorporating Burlington and described as a straight line to be described as 
Llows: Beginning at the comer of Billerica, BuHington and Wilmington, an unmarked point in the middle 
Lubbers Brook, about % mile northwest of the junction of Forest Street with Burlington Avenue and north 
*09' east and about 10 feet distant from the witness mark, a granite monument marked B B W, situated in a 
imp covered with a thick growth of bushes and trees 4 feet from the westerly bank of the brook; south 38o 
6t 1600' +_ to B-W-1 thence south 390east 700' +^ to B-W-2 thence south 55° east 700' to B-W-3 thence 
nth 35°east 1200' to B-W-4 thence south 53° east 800'+.to B-W-5 thence south 41° 58' 44" east 9200' +_ to 
i corner of Burlington, Wilmington and Wobum, a granite monument bolted to a flat rock and marked B Wi Wo, 
;uated on the southwesterly side of Winter Street, at the northeasterly side of the dam at the outlet of 
lunings Mill Pond, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Board of Selectmen. 

fcion by Mr. Mi cell: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to submit to the 
iieral Court in accordance with Section 7, Chapter 42 General Laws as amended, a proposal to change the 
m Line between Wilmington and Burlington as established by Chapter 2, Acts of 1730, incorporating Wilming- 
1 and again in Chapter 74 of the Acts of 1798 incorporating Burlington and described as a straight line to 
described as laid out above in Article 58." Finance Committee approved. Voted unanimously and so declared 
1 the Moderator. 

'5:25 p.m. Mr. Belbin moved to recess until 7:00 p.m. Adjournment voted. The meeting reconvened at 7:10 
n. there being a quorum present. 

tion by Mrs. Madelyn McKie: "I move to take Article 60 out of order inasmuch as the content and procedures 
r Flood Plain Districts should be determined before the application of the recommended Flood Plain District 
1 particular areas on the Zoning Map. Voted to take Article 60 out of order. 

riCLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by inserting the following in their 
?per sequence; or do anything else in relation thereto. 

[-5 Uses in a Flood Plain District 

A. In a Flood Plain District, the following uses are hereby permitted: 

1. Any use permitted in the District which the Flood Plain District overlays, under the conditions 
and procedures as provided for such District, subject to the following provisions. 



95 



ARTICLE 60. (continued) 

a. No building, wall, dam or other structure shall be erected, constructed, a:itered, enlarged or 
otherwise created or moved within the Flood Plain District. 

b. No dumping, filling, excavating or transferring of any material within said District shall re- 
duce high-water storage capacity or otherwise significantly affect the drainage or natural flc 
pattern in the water course except as required for flood control or water supply. 

c. No Sewage disposal system or other potential source of substantial pollution or building for 
human occupancy is permitted within the Flood Plain District. 

d. Any and all sewage disposal systems, storage areas, or tanks for chemicals or petroleum producLf 
or other potential sources of substantial pollution shall be set back from the boundaries of 
the Flood Plain District by at least 50 feet. 

B. In a Flood Plain District, the following uses are permitted as authorized on appeal by the Board c 
Appeals, and as specified in Section VIII-2 B hereinafter. 

1. Open land uses, with accessory buildings and structures, subject to the following provisions. 

a. Any such building or structure permitted by the Board of Appeals shall be designed, placed anc 
constructed to offer a minimum obstruction to the flow of water and shall be firmly anchored 
to prevent floating away. 

2. Driveway or road, where alternative means of access are impractical, subject to the following pr 
vi sions . 

a. Provided that after reference to and report by the Town Enginner, the Board of Appeals shall 
find that there will be adequate drainage and that such driveway or road will not interfere 
adversely with the natural flow of water in the area or with the general purposes for which 
Flood Plain Districts are established. 

C. If any land shown on the Zoning Map as being in the Flood Plain District is found by the Board of 
' Appeals, after reference of the proof to and report by the Board of Health and Planning Board, as 

being in fact not subject to flooding or not unsuitable because of drainage conditions for permitt; 
development, and that the use of such land for such development will not interfere with the general 
purposes for which Flood Plain Districts have been established, and will not be detrimental to thes 
public health, safety or welfare, the Board of Appeals may permit the use of such land for any pert 
mitted use under all the provisions of this by-law applying to the under-lying District in which ti 
land is located. 

D. If for any reason the restrictions or requirements contained in this Section shall be or become ihi 
valid or inoperative as to any land shown on the Zoning Map as being in the Flood Plain District, 
then such land shall continue to be zoned in the District which the Flood Plain Districts overlays 

SECTION 1-2 ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION OF DISTRICTS 
A. 7. Flood Plain Districts(W) 

D.5. The boundaries of Flood Plain Districts are the property lines, dimension lines or the contour 
lines for the elevation above mean sea-level (Boston Base) indicated by the figures therein or 
at least 50 feet on both sides from the center line of the stream. All areas within the out- 
lines of any Flood Plain District shown on the Zoning Map which are within 50 feet of the center' 
line of the stream, or are at or below the contour level indicated by the figure therein are 
subject to the regulations relating to the Flood Plain District. 
SECTION 1-3 LOTS IN MORE THAN ONE DISTRICT 

; and provided further that no part of any lot extending into the Flood Plain District shall be counter 
in figuring the "minimum lot area for use" as required in Section V-1 Schedule of Requirements. 

SECTION II DEFINITIONS 

13. Flood Plain District. Those areas of land adjacent to the streams and other water courses in the 
Town which experience flooding. The purpose of this District is to protect the health and safet;. 
of persons and property against the hazards of seasonal or periodic flood water inundation; to 
preserve and protect the streams and other water courses in the Town and their adjoining lands 
from pollution; to preserve and maintain the ground water table for water supply purposes; to 
protect the community against the detrimental use and development of lands in areas subject to 
flooding or adjoining such water courses; and to maintain the watershed areas of the Town for 
the health, safety and welfare of the public. 

14. Open Land Use. Any open space development which will not interfere with the general purposes 
for which Flood Plain Districts have been established. Request of the Planning Board and Board f 

Selectmen. 

Motion by Mrs. McKie: moved the adoption of an amendment to the Zoning By-Law as laid out in Article 60 
above. Finance Committee approved. The Planning Board submitted a report of approval. After a lengthy 



96 



TICLE 60 (continued) 

scussion Mr. McKelvey moved to lay this article on the table - then he was immediately allowed to withdraw 
A great deal more discussion followed. Motion to move the question - Yes-192 No-I30 Lost. 

re discussion followed. Mr. Buzzell our former Town Counsel said this law when contested will be held to 

invalid. Mr, Callan allowed a gentlemen from Sudbury to tell the meeting how his town had handled 
eir flood plan. 

tion to move the question from Mr. MacDonald: Yes-329 No-3 Discussion closed. Vote taken by standing: 
s-226 No-150 Motion lost. Seven rose to doubt the vote. Second vote by standing: Yes-215 No-181 Lost. 

TICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning Map of the Town of Wilmington to include the 
ood Plain Districts as shown on the plan filed in the office of the Town Clerk, or do anything else in 
lation thereto. Request of the Planning Board and the Board of Selectmen. 

tion by Mrs. McKie: "I move to pass over Article 59 and take no action. So voted. 

TICLE 61. To see if the Town will vote to insert in the Town By-laws the regulations established by the 
ard of Selectmen entitled, "Regulations Covering the Excavation of Soil, Loam, Sand or Gravel from Land 
t in Public Use Within the Town of Wilmington", and adopted on June 24, 1957, as follows: 

GULATIONS COVERING THE EXCAVATION OF SOIL, LOAM, SAND OR GRAVEL FROM LAND NOT IN PUBLIC USE WITHIN THE 

TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
(As Established by the Board of Selectmen) 

Except as hereinafter provided, no soil, loam, sand or gravel hereinafter referred to as "earth products" 
shall be removed from any parcel of land not in public use in the Town without written permit granted by 
the Board of Selectmen, hereinafter referred to as the "Board", after a public hearing. No permits will 
be issued by the Board for such purposes unless they conform explicitly to the regulations established 
herein. 

However, nothing contained herein shall apply in connection with the construction of a building for which 
a permit has been duly issued or for the landscaping of the lot or lots upon which a building was erected 
where "earth products" are not to be removed from the property, 

A grade will be established by the Town Engineer, and approved by the Board of Selectmen as the grade 
below which no earth products shall be removed. The operation shall be no lower than the grade of the 
surrounding terrain and the grade of adjacent streets so as to leave no holes or depressions. Before 
any operation is conducted to remove earth products from the petitioner's premises, the petitioner will 
obtain from the Board of Selectmen a certificate setting forth the establishment of the aforesaid grade 
and such other conditions imposed under these regulations, will assent thereto, and will leave with the 
Town Engineer said copy of the certificate with his assent endorsed thereon which the Engineer will file 
in the office of the Town Clerk. Any expense incurred in establishing said grade and conforming to 
said conditions shall be paid by the petitioner. 

Accompanying the petition for the removal of earth products must be a plan of the premises bearing the 
approval of the Building Inspector, the Board of Health, the Superintendent of Streets, the Town Engineer 
and the Town Manager. On this plan the following information must appear: 

a. North point, date and scale. (Said scale not to exceed 1" to 40') 

b. Contour lines at two foot intervals. 

c. Names and addresses of all abuttors as determined from the most recent tax list as certified by 
the Board of Assessors. 

d. The location of the property within which the proposed excavation is to be done and sufficient in- 
formation to accurately locate the plan, including exact data as to distances, bearings, etc. of 
the boundary lines of the property. 

e. Exact locations and limits of the proposed excavation. 

f. Grades or elevations to which the operation will extend and the proposed finished grades and con- 
tours of the area to be excavated, all referring to a permanent bench mark in reference to the 
Wilmington base. 

g. The location, widths, and other dimensions of all existing or platted ways, easements and public 
areas and other important features such as railroad lines, water courses, exceptional topography, 
etc. within and contiguous to the tract to be excavated and major site features such as existing 



97 



ARTICLE 61. (continued) 

stone walls, fences, buildings, large trees, rock ridges and outcroppings, swamps and water bodit 
h. Distance of the limits and edges of the operation from all abuttors' lines, sidelines of streets 

passageways, rights of way, and any other way or structure, 
j. Method of drainage of both the finished site, and during the operation. 

k. Boundary and grade stakes shall be placed at all points designated by the Town Engineer. 

5. Said plan shall conform to the following specifications: 

a. It shall be prepared by a competent professional engineer and/or registered land surveyor and sh; 
be clearly and legibly drawn upon tracing paper. 

b. The plan, including contours shall be drawn with black waterproof ink except that the proposed 
finished grades shall be shown in pencil until approved by the Board of Selectmen, at which time 
said grades and contours shall be drawn in red or orange ink before filing with the Town Engineei 

6. A permit shall not be issued for the removal of earth products except upon conditions that all topsoi 
or loam within the area to be excavated shall be windrowed to one side and respread upon completion ( 
the proposed excavation. Notwithstanding other provisions, rules, regulations, licenses or permits 
pertaining to a proposed project, no loam, or topsoi 1 shall be removed from the property except upon 
condition that a cover of compacted topsoi 1 of not less than six inches in depth shall be allowed to 
remain, provided, however, that a permit may be granted for the removal of all topsoi 1 necessary or i 
cidental to the construction of a road, or other permanent facility which changes the character of tl 
use of the land; but in such cases the Board shall require evidence of good faith in the intent of tt 
applicant to complete such roads or other facility, and shall make such evidence part of its records, 

7. A permit shall not be issued for the removal of earth products within 300 feet of a public way or 
private way or any dwelling house abutting upon such a way or within 300 feet of any approved and 
registered subdivision or within 500 feet of any public facilities such as schools, playgrounds, pub] 
buildings or churches, or within 500 feet of any property dedicated to public purposes, or within 40 
of abutters' lines, 

8. No embankment shall have more than a forty-five degree angle from the base of the pit to the top of t' 
embankment . 

9. The permit will be valid for a period not to exceed twelve (12) months from the date of issuance. A 
permit issued according to these regulations shall expire upon the completion of the removal of earth! 
products for which it was issued and in any event upon the expiration of one year from the time it vi^ 
issued. If at the expiration of said permit it appears that the operations for which said permit was- 
issued have been carried on continuously and in good faith but have not been completed and that all c 
ditions presently applicable have been complied with, the permit may be renewed for an additional pei' 
not to exceed one year without a public hearing. The expiration or revocation of the permit shall nc 
affect the obligation of the holder thereof to comply with the conditions attached to the permit or 
release him of the surety on his bond from the obligations thereof or require the return of any depoa 
made by him until such conditions have been complied with. 

10. A permit shall not be issued for the removal of earth products in any location if such removal will 
endanger the public health, safety or convenience or constitute a nuisance. 

11. Nothing stated or promulgated in these regulations shall be construed or interpreted in such a mannei; 
as to restrict the Board from attaching such additional or special conditions required for the con- 
venience, safety and health of the public prior to the issuance of any permit, nor shall the Board bei 
limited in any way in adjusting these regulations for the requirement of special or unusual circumsts 

12. Whenever the Board is satisfied that the removal of earth products has been undertaken in a particulc 
location and was in continuous operation at the time that the Town adopted Section 33 of Chapter 5 of 
its present By-Laws, a permit for further continuance of such operation, within the same territorial 
limits may be issued without a public hearing, but said permit shall be issued subject to conditions 
in the same manner as other permits. 

13. The Board shall establish a fee for the issuance of permits sufficient to reimburse the Town for the 
cost of applying and enforcing these regulations; and no permits shall be issued until such a fee is 
paid . 



98 



'ICLE 61. (continued) 

If it comes to the attention of the Board that there has been a violation of these regulations, the 
Board shall send to the offender a written warning; and if the offender persists in such violation, the 
Board shall seek the imposition of the penalties provided under General Law, Chapter 40, Section 21, 
Paragraph 17, as amended and the permit authorizing said operation shall be revoked immediately. 

When the Board finds that any operation made for the purpose of removing earth products is maintained 
in such a way as to endanger the public health or safety or constitute a nuisance the Board will 
request the Board of Health to take such steps as are authorized by law to protect the public health 
and safety, or to cause such nuisance to be abated. 

No building, screens, stone crushers or other equipment commonly used in commercial operation will be 
erected or used on the premises. 

Any excavation material spilled from the trucks of the petitioner or his purchasers upon the public 
highway or upon private property abutting the highway shall be promptly removed therefrom by the 
petitioner. 

No earth products will be removed from the aforesaid premises and no operations in connection with 
that business will be conducted before seven-thirty a.m., or after six p.m. on weekdays and no operations 
will be permitted on Sundays except by a special permit or in cases of emergency as approved by the 
Board of Selectmen. 

Mechanical equipment will be limited to not more than two mechanical shovels, two bulldozers, one crane, 
two graders and one tractor on the premises at any time. 

No more than twenty vehicles will be used by the petitioner in any single day, and that number will in- 
clude any purchaser who may purchase at the location. This does not limit the number of trips of the 
twenty (20) vehicles within hours mentioned in condition #18. 

All stumps, rocks. and stones will be removed or disposed of down to the grade established under the terms 
of the permit and all ledge shall be shaped down in general conformity with the grade and to the satis- 
faction of the Town Engineer. 

All brush, tree stumps and logs shall be burned and the residue buried. 

An indemnity bond issued by a reputable bonding company on behalf of the property owner and satisfactory 
to the Board of Selectmen and Town Counsel, in the amount of Ten Thousand Dollars ($10,000) for the 
performance of the conditions of this permit shall be filed with the Selectmen before a permit is awarded 
A bond for a lesser or greater amount may be required under special or unusual circumstances. Said bond 
shall guarantee completion of the proposed excavation in full conformity with these regulations not later 
than one year from the date of issuance of the permit. 

In the event of a cancellation or termination of the bond, this permit will be automatically revoked as 
of the effective date of the cancellation or termination of the bond. 

The petitioner shall comply with all the applicable laws, rules, and regulations of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, the Department of Public Works of said Commonwealth and the Town of Wilmington in respect 
to the permissible axle load of trucks operating to and from said premises over the public highway. 

Removal of earth products must be carried on in a workmanlike manner and the site must be left in a con- 
dition satisfactory to the Town Engineer. 

No permit shall be issued hereunder for any work which would be in violation of any provision of the 
Zoning By-Law or other by-laws, rules or regulations of the Town of Wilmington. 

All haul roads to be used must be specified in the application for approval by the Board of Selectmen, 
recommended by the Police Department for safety and the Highway Department for road conditions, and the 
conditions of said roads will be the direct responsibility of said petitioner. The right to discontinue 
the use of any haul roads without advance notice is reserved by the Board of Selectmen. 



99 



ARTICLE 61. (continued) 

29. All trucks and equipment used for excavation or hauling from the proposed operation shall observe sucl 
speed limits, load limits, haul routes and other requirements of the Board of Selectmen including the 
posting of special police officers when and where deemed necessary by the Board of Selectmen. 

30. To insure conformity with said rules, regulations and requirements, and in addition to all other surei 
posted in compliance therewith, the owner of the trucks and equipment used for excavation and hauling 
from the proposed operation shall file in duplicate, a certified list of such equipment, together witl 
a full and complete description, the registration number of each item of equipment, and further proviti 
that said owner or owners shall post a certified check in an amount equal to the total derived from tl 
following schedule per each item of equipment: '■>'■ 

Actual Rated Carrying Capacity Amount 
Up to four (4) cubic yds. $ 50.00 

Up to ten (10) cubic yds. 100.00 
Over ten (10) cubic yds. 200.00 

Increased capacity from the authorized use of sideboards or other devices shall be 

added to the normal capacity. Unauthorized use of such devices shall be deemed an 

automatic violation of these regulations. 
Said check shall be forfeited if provisions of these regulations are violated, and further provided 
that said check may be drawn upon at will by the Town of Wilmington to repair any damage or to mainta; 
said designated haul roads. No trucks or equipment except as described in said list may be used in 
said operation; and the name of the owner or owners of all trucks used in said operation, together 
with a designated number shall be clearly marked on the tail gate of each vehicle with contrasting 
paint in letters not less than six inches in height and one inch in width to the full satisfaction 
of the Town Engineer and so maintained for the duration of the operation. Any violation of this or 
any other provisions of these regulations shall be deemed cause to revoke said permit and shall 
constitute the automatic forfeiture of all security posted in accordance with these regulations. 

31. With the exception of properties within the line of taking Routes 93 and 125 no new properties will b( 
licensed for the disposition of gravel outside the Town of Wilmington. 

32. All existing operations must conform to all requirements stated herein effective as of September 1, 
1957 . 

by amending the Town By-laws to include in its entirety the above-mentioned regulations by inserting same 
in Chapter 5, to be entitled Section 33B, or do anything else in relation thereto. Request of the Board o; 
Selectmen. 

Motion by Mrs. Wavie M. Drew: "I move that the Town vote to pass over Article 61 and take no action. Votec 
to take no action. 



ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to amend the "By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington" and the Zoning 
By-Law by deleting in its entirety Chapter 6 of the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington; and, with the excep' 
tion of the first sentence of Section 1, inserting the remaining provisions of that Chapter 6 in the Zoninj 
By-law under Section IV Special Regulations Governing Use Districts by adding the numeral 5 (five) and the 
word "Signs"; or do anything else in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. 

Motion by Mrs. Madelyn McKie: "I move to amend the'By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington' and the Zoning By-Lai 
by deleting in its entirety Chapter 6 of the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington; and, with the exception of 
the first sentence of Section 1, inserting the remaining provisions of that Chapter 6 in the Zoning By-Law 
under Section IV Special Regulations Governing Use Districts by adding the numeral (5) five and the word 
"Signs." Finance Committee approved. Planning Board reported approval. Motion voted unanimously and so 
declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by striking out in its entirety that 
portion of Section III-4-B which reads as follows: "1. Truck terminal or motor freight station." or do 
anything in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. 

Motion by Mrs. McKie: "I move to amend the Zoning By-Law by striking out in its entirety that portion of 
Section III-4-B which reads as follows: 

"1. Truck terminal or motor freight station." 
Finance Committee disapproved. Planning Board reported approval. Motion voted unanimously and so declare( 
by the Moderator. 



t: 



100 



"ICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by striking out in its entirety the first 
•agraph in Section V-4A. Setbacks and Yards and inserting in its place the following: "For the purpose of 
linistering this Section, the Minimum Setback from the Center Line of Street of any lot shall be measured 
a right angle from the center line of each and every street or way to the nearest portion of the building 
jacent thereto. The Minimum Front Yard Depth of any lot shall be measured at a right angle from the ex- 
fior line of each and every street or way to the nearest portion of the building adjacent thereto. Which- 
>r distance is the greater shall constitute the required setback." or do anything else in relation thereto, 
[uest of the Planning Board. 

-ion by Mr. Hanlon: "I move to amend the Zoning By-Law by striking out in its entirety the first paragraph 
Section V-4 A. Set-Backs and Yards and inserting in its place the following: "For the purpose of adminis- 
•ing this Section, the Minimum Set-back from the Center Line of Street of any lot shall be measured at a 
;ht angle from the center line of each and every street or way to the nearest portion of the building adja- 
it thereto. The Minimum Front Yard Depth of any lot shall be measured at a right angle from the exterior 
le of each and every street or way to the nearest portion of the building adjacent thereto. Whichever dis- 
ice is the greater shall constitute the required set-back." Finance Committee disapproved. Planning Board 
;ommended approval. Vote taken by standing: Yes-301 No-8 Motion voted. 

CICLE 65. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by striking out in its entirety that 
•tion of Section III-l-B-5 which reads as follows: "Clubhouse, lodge, or other non-profit recreational, 
:ial, educational or civic use operated for members, excluding outdoor use of firearms." or do anything 
ie in relation thereto. Request of the Planning Board. 

tion by Mr. Hanlon: "I move to pass over Article 65 and take no action thereon." Finance Committee approved, 
inning Board reported that they recommended this article be passed over. Vote taken by voice and declared 
red to pass over. Seven rose to doubt the vote. Vote taken by standing: Yes-174 No-104 Voted to pass 
ir and take no action. 

nCLE 66. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by inserting the words, "excluding s;and, 
ivel and earth products;" in Section III-4A.5. after the words "building materials", so that it reads as 
Llows: "5. Open storage of the following items, in an unused condition; building materials, excluding sand, 
tvel and earth products; furniture and appliances; hardware; metal; paper; pipe; rubber; wood and other 
ms similar in character and in the effect on adjacent property." or do anything in relation thereto. 
}uest of the Planning Board. 

:ion by Mr. Hanlon: "I move to amend the Zoning By-Law by inserting the words, "excluding sand, gravel and 
■th products," in Section III-4 A. 5. after the words "Building materials", so that it reads as follows: 

Open storage of the following items in an unused condition; building materials, excluding sand, gravel 
I earth products; furniture and appliances; hardware; metal; paper; pipe; rubber; wood and other items 
lilar in character and in the effect on adjacent property." Finance Committee approved. Planning Board 
)orted approval. Voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

:ICLE 67. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law by inserting in Section III-I A 6, after 
'. word "use", the words "excluding buildings except as an accessory use", so that it reads as follows: 

Public recreational use, excluding buildings except as an accessory use, provided that no play or picnic 
'.a is located within the required front or side yard"; or do anything e Ise in relation thereto. Request of 
Planning Board. 

ion by Mr. Hooper: "I move to amend the Zoning By-Laws by inserting in Section III-l A 6, after the word, 
;e", the words "excluding buildings except as an accessory use", so that it reads as follows: "6. Public 
i;reational use, excluding buildings except as an accessory use, provided that no play or picnic area is 
:ated within the required front or side yard." Finance Committee approved. Planning Board reported 
Droval. Voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

nCLE 68. To see whether the Town acting pursuant to Section 7 of Chapter 550 of the Acts of 1952, will 
x>wer the Wilmington Housing Authority to erect a new housing project, namely a Housing Project for Elderly 
s-sons pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 667 of Massachusetts, Acts of 1954, and acts in amendment 
creof and in addition thereto. Request of the Wilmington Housing Authority. 

l:ion by Mr. Earl Zimmerman: "I move that the Town acting pursuant to Section 7 of Chapter 550 of the Acts of 
'i2, empower the Wilmington Housing Authority to erect a new housing project, namely a Housing Project for 
tierly Persons pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 667 of Massachusetts, Acts of 1954, and acts in amend- 



101 




ARTICLE 68. (continued) 

ment thereof and in addition thereto. Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declare 
by the Moderator. 

II 

ARTICLE 69. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of laying- 
water main in Hudson Street for a certain distance, as shown on a plan on file with the Superintendent of t 
Water Department, of not less than six inches but less than sixteen inches in diameter, in accordance with 
the recommendations of the Board of /7ater & Sewer Commissioners acting under the provisions of General Laws ^ 
(Ter. Ed.) Chapter 40, Sections 42G to 421 inclusive, and determine how the appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise, or do anything in relatio j 
thereto. Request of the Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate $1,890.00 for the purpose of laying a water ' 
main of not less than 6 inches but less than 16 inches in diameter for a certain distance in Hudson Street . 
accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Water Commissioners acting under the provisions of Gene 
Laws, Chapter 40, Sections 42G and 421 inclusive, and that said appropriation be raised by transfer from 
Water Department Account #1162, the Royal Street Water Betterment Account." Finance Committee approved. 
Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 70. To see if the Town will vote to accept and receive as a gift for school purposes from Louise H ' 
Gorman a certain parcel of land situated in "Silver Lake Gardens, Plat No. 2" in the Town of Wilmington in I 
the County of Middlesex in the State of Massachusetts; being numbered Lots 875, 876, 877 and 878, being fou 
(4) lots of land located at the corner of Norfolk and Kilby Streets, and containing twelve thousand eight ^ 
hundred and sixty-nine (12,869) square feet of land, more or less, on plan of "Silver Lake Gardens, Plat #2 
made by Brooks, Jordan & Graves, C. Engineers, dated September 1928, and on file in the Middlesex North I 
District Registry of Deeds, Lowell, Mass., to which reference may be had for a more particular description,! 
Book of Plans 52, Plan 73, Subject to restrictions of record insofar as the same may be in force and i 
applicable; or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Mr. Bruce MacDonald that the Town adopt the above Article 70 and accept and receive as a gift for^ 
school purposes a certain parcel of land as laid out in said Article 70. Finance Committee approved. Moti' 
voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. I 

ARTICLE 71. To see if the Town will vote to accept General Laws Chapter 48, Section 58D, which pertains to 
forty-two hour work week for permanent members of the Fire Department, or do anything in relation thereto. , 
Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Mr. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to accept General Laws Chapter 48, Section 58D, which perta ' 
to a forty-two hour work week for permanent members of the Fire Department; and that the Town vote to raise , 
by taxation and appropriate the sum of $23,200.00 for this purpose and other additional cost." Finance 
Committee approved. Motion voted. 

ARTICLE 72. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be expended under the 
direction of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners, for the purpose of constructing sewers, intercepto: 
and other necessary appurtenant structures in various locations within the town, and determine whether said 
funds shall be provided by taxation, by transfer from available funds in the treasury, by borrowing, or by 
any combination therefor; and to authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners to apply for and 
accept any Federal and State funds available as contributions towards the cost of such projects. Request o. 
the Water and Sewer Commissioners. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that Che Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of five hundred fifty 
thousand ($550,000.00) dollars to be expended under the direction of the Board of Water and Sewer Commission 
for the purpose of constructing sewers, interceptors and other necessary appurtenant structures in various 
locations within the Town and subject to the assessment of betterments or otherwise in accordance with 
Chapter 297 of the Acts of 1958 and all acts in amentment thereof and in addition thereto and to authorize I 
Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners to acquire any fee, easement or other interest in land necessary 
therefor, whether by eminent domain, purchase or gift, or otherwise; and to further authorize the Board of 
Water and Sewer Commissioners to apply for and accept any Federal and State funds available as contributions 
towards the cost of such projects, six thousand ($6,000.00) dollars of said sum to be raised by taxation, 
five thousand ($5,000.00) dollars to be transferred from Account 1155 originally appropriated by taxation i: 
Article 61 of the Adjourned Town Meeting of March 15, 1969, and the Treasurer with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums in the amount of five hundred thirty-nine 



102 



;CLE 72. (continued) 

isand ($539,000) dollars and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44 of the General 
i." Finance Committee approved. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

;CLE 73. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to be expended under the 
jction of the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners for the purpose of updating the comprehensive sewer- 
study made by Whitman and Howard, Engineers, in their report dated April 21, 1958. Request of the Water 
Sewer Commissioners. Motion by Mr. Morris, that we pass over Article 73 and take no action. Voted 
limously and so declared by the Moderator. 

[CLE 74. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
appropriate for the installation and fencing of a four-court tennis and ice skating area at the Glen Road 
jol, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

Lon by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $13,000 for 
installation and fencing of a four-court tennis and ice skating area at the Glen Road School," Finance 
nittee disapproved. Vote taken by voice and the Chair was in doubt. Vote taken by standing: Yes-220 
132 Motion carries. 

[CLE 75. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 
appropriate for the installation and fencing of a four-court tennis and ice skating area at the Shawsheen 
ool , or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Town Manager. 

ion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $13,000.00 
the installation and fencing of a four-court tennis and ice skating area at the Shawsheen School." 
ance Committee disapproved. Vote by voice carried. 

ICLE 76. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds 

appropriate for the installation of lights at the North Intermediate School Tennis Courts, or do anything 
relation thereto. Request of the Recreation Commission. 

ion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote td raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $6,000 for 
installation of lights at the North Intermediate School Tennis Courts." Finance Committee disapproved. 
& taken by voice. The chair was in doubt. Vote taken by standing: Yes-165 No-183. Lost. 

ICLE 77. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition the Department of Natural 
ources, or any other State agency, for the construction of an indoor Ice Skating Rink within the Town, or 
anything in relation thereto. 

ion by Mr, Carl A, Backman, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to petition the 
artment of Natural Resources, or any other State agency, for the construction of an indoor Ice Skating 
k within the Town. Motion so voted. 

ICLE 78. To see if the Town will vote to rezone the land of Bernard J, Ristuccia and Elinor Ristuccia 
im Residential District to General Business, said land more particularly described as follows: the land 
luated in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts shown as lots four hundred ninety-three (493) to five 
idred thirty-four (534) inclusive on a plan entitled "Silver Lake Addition" dated Sept. 1920, Plan 73, said 
s 493 to 526 are together bounded: Southerly by several courses on Bridge Lane, together totalling one 
idred sixty-two (162) feet, more or less Westerly by Hobson Avenue, four hundred forty-three (443) feet, 
e or less Northerly by Richmond Street, one hundred sixty (160) feet, more or less; and Easterly by Dewey 
inue, four hundred four (404) feet, more or less. And together contains 68,775 square feet more or less. 
Id lots 527 to 534 are together bounded; Easterly by Dewey Avenue, one hundred (100) feet. Southerly by 
ihmond Street, one hundred sixty (160) feet. Westerly by Hobson Avenue, one hundred Northerly by Lots 535 

543 as shown on said plan, one hundred sixty (160) feet. And together contains 16,000 Square feet, 
Jording to said plan. Request of Bernard J. Ristuccia, et al. 

Simon Cutter offered a motion to effect Article 78 with some amendments. Finance Committee disapproved, 
mning Board at first stated "No Report", then approved the article as amended by Mr. Cutter. After a 
igthy discussion, vote was taken by standing: Yes-16 No-235 Motion lost. 

:er asked the meeting to reconsider Article 60 at this time. Lost. 



103 



Mr. Vitale asked the meeting to reconsider Article 76 at this time. Lost. 

ARTICLE 79. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available func 
ar.d appropriate for the use of the Permanent Building Committee for the preparation of preliminary plans i 
cost estimates for the construction of an addition to the Police Station on Adelaide Street, or do anythi 
in relation thereto. Request of the Board of Selectmen. 

Motion by Miceli to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $750.00 to effect the purpose of the abo'v 
Article 79 was lost by a voice vote. 

At 11:15 p.m., Mr. Banda moved that the meeting adjourn to Monday night, March 24, 1970 at 7:30 p.m. in th 
High School Gymnasium. Vote taken by voice and declared voted. Seven rose to doubt the vote. Vote taker 
by standing: Yes-234 No-112. Voted to adjourn as is noted in the above motion. 

There were 424 voters checked in the afternoon meeting. There were 465 voters checked in the evening 
meeting . 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 23, 1970 \ 

At 7:35 p.m. the meeting was called to order by Mr. Callan, there being a quorum present. Mr. Joseph F. 
Courtney moved to take Article 81 before Article 80 it being more logical. So voted. 

ARTICLE 81. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington so as to 
provide for Limited Garden Apartment Districts and to regulate the same by adding the following sections a? 
provisions to the aforesaid Zoning By-Law, or do anything in relation thereto: 

I. To add to section I, Subsection 1-2, paragraph A thereof, under the caption "ESTABLISHMENT AND i 
LOCATION OF DISTRICTS", the following new district: 
7. Limited Garden Apartment Districts (LGA) 
II. To add to section II thereof, under the caption "DEFINITIONS", the following new definitions: 

13. STORY. That portion of a building contained between any floor and the floor and roof next abo:i 
it, but not including the lowest portion so contained if more than one half of such portion vertical 
is below the mean finished grade of the ground adjoining such building. 

14. FRONT YARD. The open space between a building and the exterior line of each street on which t: 
lot on which it stands abuts. 

15. SIDE AND REAR YARD. The open space at the sides and rear of a building and the boundaries, otl 
than streets, of the lot on which it stands. 

16. SANITARY SEWER. A public sanitary sewer of the Town of Wilmington. 

17. MUNICIPAL. The word "municipal" means the Town of Wilmington. 

18. PUBLIC. The word "public" means the Town of Wilmington. 

III. To add to Section III thereof, under the caption "USE REGULATIONS" the following new section: III-5. 
USES IN LIMITED GARDEN APARTMENT DISTRICTS 

A. In a Limited Garden Apartment District, the following uses are hereby permitted: 

1. Garden apartments subject to the following conditions: 

a. There shall be at least six detached or semi-detached buildings and no such building shall 
contain less than eight dwelling units; and each such unit shall have independent cooking 
facilities, and shall contain no more than two sleeping rooms. 

b. No living quarters shall be permitted above three stories in height nor below the mean 
finished grade. 

c. The buildings shall connect with a sanitary sewer. 

d. At least fifteen (15%) per cent of the total site area shall be reserved for natural or 
landscaped open space, exlusive of sidewalks, driveways, streets and parking areas, but includ- 
ing swimming pools, tennis courts, and similar authorized recreational uses and facilities. 

2. Buildings and uses accessory to garden apartments. 

' 3. Uses permitted in Single Residence A districts as enumerated in Se^ction III, Subsection III-l, 

paragraphs A (6), and A (9) (a) (b) (f) (g) (h) and (i). 

4. Outdoor amusement or recreation uses devoted to or related to court games, golf, skating or 
swimming, but restricted to the use of residents or tenants or guests thereof in said district. 

B. Finding and Determination by the Town Engineer 
1. No building for any of the uses permitted by the terms of the preceding paragraph A shall be 
constructed or reconstructed or substantially altered externally, or added to, unless the Town 
Engineer, after consultation with the Planning Board, shall have made a finding and determination 



104 



[CLE 81. (continued) 

that the proposed location of buildings, the proposed topographical changes, if any, and the 
planned provisions for waste disposal, surface and ground water drainage, erosion control, 
parking areas, driveways, the location of the intersection of driveways and streets, vehicular 
access, and access for firefighting equipment are adequate for the reasonable protection of public 
safety and health in the proposed use of the site. 

2. For the Purpose of administering this Section III-5-B, an application for said finding and deter- 
mination together with a preliminary site plan each in triplicate shall be submitted to the Town 
Engineer. Such application and site plan shall include the elements as to which the Town Engineer 
is to make a finding and determination, as hereinbefore provided, with information in respect to 
such elements as the Town Engineer shall reasonably require. Said application and site plan may 
also contain the necessary information and plan for off-street parking otherwise required to be 
submitted separately in accordance with Section IV-3. 

3. Upon receipt of said application and site plan, the Town Engineer shall within five (5) days trans- 
mit to the Planning Board two (2) copies of said application and site plan. The Planning Board shall 
consider the same, and shall submit a final report thereon with recommendations to the Town Engineer. 
The Town Engineer shall not make a finding and determination upon an application until either the 
Planning Board has submitted said final report or ten (10) days shall have elapsed since the trans- 
mittal of said copies of the application and site plan to the Planning Board without any such re- 
port having been received by the Town Engineer. In any event, the Town Engineer shall take final 
action on an application within fifteen (15) days after the filing of said application and site 

plan by the applicant. If the Town Engineer shall fail to take final action as aforesaid within 
said fifteen (15) days, the Town Engineer shall be deemed to have a finding and determination that 
the proposed site plan is adequate for the reasonable protection of public safety and health in the 
proposed use of the site. 

4. The final action by the Town Engineer shall consist of either (1) a finding and determination that 
the proposed site plan is adequate for the reasonable protection of public safety and health in the 
proposed use of the site, or (2) a written denial of the application and site plan for such finding 
and determination, stating in complete and precise detail the reasons for said denial and wherein any 
elements in and any particular features of the application and site plan are deemed to be inadequate, 
and further specifying in complete and precise detail each and every change and modification in said 
application and site plan together with the reasons therefore, which if accepted by the applicant 
and incorporated in or applied to said application and site plan, would result in a finding and 
determination by the Town Engineer that said application and site plan is adequate for the reasonable 
protection of public safety and health in the proposed use of the site. 

5. In the event the Town Engineer makes such finding and determination such use, extension, erection or 
enlargement shall be carried on only in essential conformity with the application and site plan on the 
basis of which the said finding and determination is made. 

6. The Town Engineer may, in his discretion, instead of denying the application and site plan, make 
said finding and determination subject to precisely stated, reasonable conditions and restrictions in 
writing which if assented to by the applicant in writing, shall be deemed to have been incorporated 
into and made a part of the application and site plan, without requiring the applicant to submit or 
resubmit a modified or amended application and site plan. 

7. The period within final action shall be taken may be extended for a definite period by mutual con- 
sent of the Town Engineer and the applicant. In the event the Town Engineer determines that a site 
plan is inadequate to permit him to make a finding and determination, he may, in his discretion, 
instead of denying the application, extend the period to a later date to permit the applicant to sub- 
mit a revised site plan or application, provided, however, that such period is extended to a day 
certain by mutual consent. 

8. The Town Engineer shall file with his records a written report of his final action on each applica- 
tion, with his reasons therefore. A copy of each report shall also be filed with the Planning Board 
and the Building Inspector. A copy of each application and its accompanying site plan shall likewise 
be filed with the Building Inspector. 

To add to Section IV thereof, under the caption "SPECIAL REGULvTIONS GOVERNING USE DISTRICTS", the 
I lowing: 

lA. In Subsection IV-3, under the caption "OFF-STREET PARKING", at the end of the first sentence of 
Fparagraph "A" delete the period, substitute a comma therefore, and add the phrase "except as noted". 
tB. At the end of the aforesaid paragraph "A", add the follov;ing new specification: 

12. For garden apartments, one and one half spaces on the premises for each dwelling unit, and 
reasonably accessible thereto. 



105 



ARTICLE 81. (continued) 

C. In Subsection IV-4, under the caption "SCREENING OF OPEN USES" at the end of the first sentence 
delete the period, substitute a comma therefore, and add the phrase "or a Limited Garden Apartment 
District, " 

V. To add to Section V, Subsection V-1 thereof, under the caption "HEIGHT, AREA AND YARD REGULATIONS", 
the following new schedule of requirements: 



A. 


Under 


the 


headi ng 


B. 


Under 


the 


heading 


c. 


Under 


the 


heading 




feet" 


> 




D. 


Under 


the 


heading 


E. 


Under 


the 


heading 


F. 


Under 


the 


heading 


G. 


Under 


the 


heading 


shall be 


construed as 


H. 


Under 


the 


heading 


I. 


Under 


the 


heading 


J. 


Under 


the 


heading 


K. 


Under 


the 


heading 


L. 


Under 


the 


headi ng 



'Minimum Front Yard Depth", the words "35 feet"; 
'Minimum Width for Each Side-Yard", the words "30 feet"; 
'Minimum Rear Yard Depth", the words "30 feet"; 
'Minimum Lot Depth", the words "300 feet"; 

'Maximum Lot Coverage for Buildings or Structures", the words "25 per cent". 

VI. To add to Section V, Subsection V-4, under the caption "SET-BACK AND YARDS", the following: 

In paragraph D, in the first sentence, after the phrase "in any District" and before the word "no", 
insert the words "except in a Limited Garden Apartment District"; or do anything in relation thereto 
Request of Harold E. Smith et al . 

Motion by Mr. Joseph E. Courtney. Moderator asked Mr. Courtney if the motion followed the article exactly 
The answer being yes, Mr. Callan dispensed with the reading of the motion. The Finance Committee dis- 
approved the article. The Planning Board reported to the meeting that they recommend disapproval of this. 
Article. After a lengthy discussion the question was called for and the vote was unanimous. Standing vot. 
Yes - 289 No - 280 Motion lost. 



ARTICLE 80. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to Limited Garden Apartment District, the following des-s 
cribed parcel of land, to wit: - Being the land of Harold E. Smith and Eleanor J. Smith designated as Lot 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., dated April 7, 1969, Dana F, Perkins and Sons, Inc. 
Civil Engineers and Surveyors, Reading-Lowell, Mass." being further bounded and described as follows: 
EASTERLY by Woburn Street, 220.60 feet; SOUTHWESTERLY by land now or formerly of Robert H. Barrows, Dana L 
Barrows, Administrator, 614.30 feet, and land now or formerly of Walpole Woodworkers, Inc., by three cours 
respectively 90.69 feet, 68.44 feet and 76.95 feet; NORTHWESTERLY by land now or formerly of Chesley L. ' 
Black and Elna C. Black by three courses, respectively 256.33 feet, 130.20 feet and 99.07 feet; NORTH- 
EASTERLY by land now or formerly of Tennessee Gas Transmission Company, 220.52 feet; SOUTHEASTERLY by lane' 
now or formerly of Harold E. Smith and Eleanor J. Smith 184.04 feet; NORTHEASTERLY by land now or former!; 
of Harold E. Smith and Eleanor J. Smith, 131.82 feet, EASTERLY by land now or formerly of John S. and ' 
Catherine A. Zwicker, 125 feet; and NORTHERLY by said land of John S. and Catherine A. Zwicker, 180 feet. 
Containing 5.17 acres of land, more or less, or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Harold E. 
Smith et al. 

Motion by Mr. Courtney that we vote to pass over Article 80 and take no action. So voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 82. To see if the Town will vote to petition the General Court for enactment of special legislatii 
for and on behalf of the Town of Wilmington for the purpose of enabling the voters of the Town of Wilmingti 
to decide every two years at each biennial state election, whether or not to allow the granting of license 
for the sale of alcoholic beverages by function halls which satisfy certain minimum standards, said legisl* 
tion to contain the following provisions or provisions essentially similar in import and effect, and for si 
purpose to authorize and direct the Town Clerk to transmit a certified copy of the vote of the Town Meetinj 
pertaining to this article to the appropriate committee or committees of the General Court which shall heaj 
and act upon the following legislation, or do anything in relation thereto: 



106 



CICLE 82. (continued) 

AN ACT RELATING TO THE GRANTING OF LICENSES FOR THE SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BY CERTAIN FUNCTION 
HALLS IN THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

"TION 1. The state secretary shall cause to be placed on the official ballot used in the Town of Wilmington 
each biennial state election the following subdivision to the question which he is required under the 
>visions of section eleven of chapter one hundred and thirty-eight of the General Laws to place on the 
ficial ballot in all cities and towns at such elections, to wit: 

F, Shall licenses be granted in the Town of Wilmington for the sale therein of all alcoholic 
beverages to be drunk on the premises by function halls having (1) a seating capacity for the serv- 
ing and consumption of food at tables of not less than two hundred persons, and (2) a minimum dining 
room area for the service and consumption of food of not less than two thousand square feet; pro- 
vided, however, (1) that such alcoholic beverages shall be sold and served only to persons seated 
at tables located in said dining area and only during occasions and activities such as banquets, 
dinners, meetings, and similar functions at which food is to be served and consumed at said tables, 
and (2) that no such alcoholic beverages shall be served or sold to persons seated or standing at 
any bar or counter or seated or standing in a lounge or other area primarily used for the serving 
and consumption of alcoholic beverages? 

YES 
NO 

If a majority of the votes cast in said town in answer to subdivision F is in the affirmative, said 
town shall, irrespective of the results of the votes in answer to subdivision A, B, C, D, or E, be 
taken to authorize for the two calendar years next succeeding the sale in said town of all alcoholic 
beverages to be drunk on the premises of function halls having (1) a seating capacity for the serving 
and consumption of food at tables of not less than two hundred persons, and (2) a minimum dining room 
area for the services and consumption of food of not less than two thousand feet; provided however, 
(1) that such alcoholic beverages shall be sold and served only to persons seated at tables located 
in said dining area, and only during occasions and activities such as banquets, dinners, meetings and 
similar functions at which food is to be served and consumed at said tables, and (2) that no such 
alcoholic beverages shall be sold or served to. persons seated or standing at any bar or counter or 
seated or standing in a lounge or other area primarily used for the serving and consumption of alco- 
holic beverages. Licenses authorized hereunder shall not be subject to any quota established by 
section seventeen of chapter one hundred and thirty-eight of the General Laws, nor shall the issuance 
of any such license decrease the number of licenses which may be issued n accordance with any quota 
established in said chapter one hundred and thirty-eight. Said licenses shall be subject, however, 
to all other provisions of said chapter one hundred and thirty-eight. 

3TI0N 2. For the purposes of this enactment, the term of "function hall' shall mean a public or miscel- 
[peous hall licensed in accordance with the provisions of chapter one hundred and forty-three of the General 
7s which is owned and operated by a private corporation or trust or a non-profit corporation or club, and 
ich is used or rented for public or private banquets, feasts, dinners, meetings, dances, or socials, and 
iier public or private gatherings and assemblies, and at which food and beverages are sold or catered and 
■rved for consumption on the premises, but which is not a public restaurant subject to a common victualler's 
: innholder's license in accordance with the provisions of chapter one hundred and forty of the General 
. *s . 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. David R. Butterworth et al. 

■;ion by Mr. Courtney. Moderator asked Mr. Courtney if the motion followed the article exactly. Mr. 
. jrtney said yes except for a word left out by the printer namely (third paragraph under (2) a minimum 
:-iing room area, etc. the words 2,000 square feet. Mr. Courtney offered an amendment under this Article: 

move to amend the main motion made pursuant to Article 82 by adding the following sentence at the end of 
:2 last paragraph of Section 1.: 'Notwithstanding any other provision of law, however, the number of 
Icenses which may be issued by local licensing authority in accordance with this section and in force and 
:f ect at any one time during any license year shall not exceed in the aggregate a total of five (5) licenses.'" 
'great deal of discussion followed. Mr. Enos moved the question. Vote taken by standing: Yes - 447 No-17 
I te carried . 

' :e on the amendment (5 licenses) by voice lost. Vote was questioned: By standing - Yes 308 No 121 
tion on the amendment carried. 



107 



ARTICLE 82. (continued) 

Some discussion on main motion. Previous question called for - vote taken by voice and was declared 
unanimous. Vote on Wain motion as amended. Yes - 251 No - 246 Vote carried. Seven doubted the vote. 
Recount declared invalid. Secret ballot called for. Mr. Buzzell said that our Town By-laws call for 40 
voters to ask for this. Vote to take a secret ballot was lost: Yes-26 No-423 Main motion as amended: 
Yes-250 No-252 Lost. Seven doubted the vote. Main motion as amended: Yes-247 No-254 Lost. 

After Article 82 a vote came to reconsider Article #81. This was lost. 

ARTICLE 83. To see if the Town will vote to authorize and direct the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
General Court for enactment of special legislation for and on behalf of the Town of Wilmington for the pu: 
pose of enabling the voters of the Town of Wilmington to decide every two years, at each biennial state 
election, whether or not to allow the granting of licenses for the sale of alcoholic beverages by restaur, 
which satisfy certain minimum standards, said legislation to contain the following provisions or provisiol 
essentially similar in import and effect, or do anything in relation thereto: j 

AN ACT RELATIVE TO THE GRANTING OF LICENSES FOR THE SALE OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES BY CERTAIN |t 
RESTAURANTS IN THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON 

SECTION I. The state secretary shall cause to be placed on the official ballot used in the Town of [ 
Wilmington at each biennial state election the following subdivision to the question which he is requiredir 
under the provisions of Section eleven of chapter one hundred and thirty-eight of the General Laws to plai j 
on the official ballot in all cities and towns at such elections, to wit: - 

E. Shall licenses be granted in the Town of Wilmington for the sale therein of all alcoholic bever- c 
ages to be drunk on the premises by restaurants having (1) a seating capacity of not less than one 
hundred persons, (2) a minimum dining room area primarily used for the serving and consumption of 
food or not less than twelve hundred square feet, and (3) a kitchen area for the preparation and cook 
ing of food of not less than five hundred square feet; provided, however, (1) that such alcoholic 
beverages shall be sold and served only to persons seated at tables or in booths located in said 
dining area, and (2) that no such alcoholic beverages shall be sold or served to persons seated or 
standing at any bar or counter or seated or standing in a lounge or other area primarily used for 
the serving and consumption of alcoholic beverages? 

If a majority of the votes cast in said town in answer to subdivision E is in the affirmative, said 
Town shall, irrespective of the results of the votes in answer to subdivisions A, B, C, and D, be 
taken to authorize for the two calendar years next succeeding the sale in said town of all alcoholic 
beverages to be drunk on the premises of restaurants having (1) a seating capacity of not less than 
one hundred persons, (2) a minimum dining room area primarily used for the serving and consumption o 
food of not less than twelve hundred square feet, and (3) a kitchen area for the preparation and 
cooking of food of not less than five hundred square feet; provided, however, (1) that such alcoholi- 
beverages shall be sold and served only to persons seated at tables or in booths located in said 
dining area, and (2) that no such alcoholic beverages shall be sold or served to persons seated or ; 
standing at any bar or counter or seated or standing in a lounge or other area primarily used for 
the serving and consumption of alcoholic beverages. Said licenses shall be subject, however to all 
other provisions of said chapter one hundred and thirty eight. Request of Rocco V. DePasquale et al, 

Motion by Mr. Courtney. The Moderator asked Mr. Courtney if the motion followed the article exactly. Thi 
answer being yes, Mr. Callan dispensed with the reading of the motion. Finance Committee disapproved thii 
article . 

Mr. Courtney offered an amendment: "I move to amend the main motion made pursuant to Article 83 by adding; 
the following sentence at the end of the final paragraph of Section 1;- 'Notwithstanding any other provis 
of law, the number of licenses which may be issued by the local licensing authority in accordance with thi 
section and in force and effect at any time during any license year shall not exceed in the aggregate one: 
license for each population unit of ten thousand or a major fraction thereof, provided, however, that the' 
total number of licenses which may be granted in accordance with this section shall not exceed three lices 
After some debate, Mr. Enos moved the question. Vote was unanimous. Vote on the amendment: Yes-290 No-.' 
Voted. Vote on the main motion as amended: Yes-210 No-219 Lost. 



108 



> ;ICLE 84. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
■ ing to rezone from existing Single, Residence A. and Neighborhood Business Districts to Limited Office and 
I el District, the following described parcel of land, to wit: - 

Being the land designated as Lots 53, 53A, 54, 55, 55A and 53B on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in 
Wilmington, Mass., dated December 30, 1969, Dana F. Perkins and Sons, Inc., Civil Engineers and 
Surveyors, Reading-Lowell, Mass.", being further bounded and described as follows: WESTERLY by 
land now or formerly of Johnsons Realty Trust shown as Lot 52 of the aforesaid plan, 166 feet more 
or less: NORTHWESTERLY by land now or formerly of Johnsons Realty Trust shown as Lot 51 on the 

I aforesaid plan, 289.15 feet more or less; NORTHERLY by said land now or formerly of Johnsons Realty 
! Trust shown as Lot 51 of the aforesaid plan, 581.59 feet more or less; EASTERLY by Interstate Route 

93, 520.04 feet more or less; SOUTHERLY by Lowell Street Park, in two courses, respectively of 
128.17 feet more or less and 32 feet more or less; SOUTHERLY by Lowell Street Park and Lowell 
Street, 653.83 feet more or less. 

Iitaining 7.8 acres of land more or less, or do anything in relation thereto. By Petition. 

t;ion by Mr. Joseph Courtney moved to pass over Article 84 and take no action. So voted. Since Articles 

II and 85 were tied in together the meeting voted to take up article 85 first. 

riCLE 85. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington as to provide 
: Limited Office and Motel Districts and to regulate the same by adding the following sections and pro- 
sions to the aforesaid Zoning By-Law, or do anything in relation thereto: 

I. To add to Section I, Subsection 1-2, paragraph A, thereof under the caption "ESTABLISHMENT AND 
;ation of districts', the following new district: 

8. Limited Office and Motel District (LOM)" 
II. To add to Section III, thereof, under the caption "USE REGULATIONS" the following new section: 
"III-6 USES IN LIMITED OFFICE AND MOTEL DISTRICTS 
A. In a limited Office and Mqtel District, the following uses are hereby permitted: 

1. Business and professional offices, including bank offices. 

2. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption on the premises of food and beverages. 

3. Showroom, provided that storage is limited to floor samples. 

4. Drugstore, dry goods shop, florist shop, gift shop, wearing apparel shop, involving the 
sale of unused merchandise at retail. 

5. Barber or beauty shop, drycleaning shop, shop for custom work by dresmaker or tailor, or 
similar consumer service or personal service establishment. 

6. Buildings and uses accessory to office buildings, motels and hotels and uses authorized in a 
Limited Office and Motel District. 

7. General advertising sign of a non-flashing type, provided that no such sign shall be located 
within a required yard area, and that the total area of all such signs does not exceed one (1) 
square foot for each linear foot of frontage of the principal public way that constitutes the 
property line of the premises on which the sign is located. 

8. Hotel, Motel subject to the following conditions which shall apply to motels only: 

a. For the purpose of this by-law, a motel shall be defined as a structure or structures 
containing sleeping rooms or one or more rooms attached to each other, and intended to be 
rented for brief periods of time for the accomodation of travelers or tourists, with a public 
restaurant as an accessory use attached. 

b. The minimum lot size shall be 120,000 square feet, having a minimum frontage of 300 feet 
along a public way of the Town. The gross ground floor area of all buildings, including 
covered walkways and carports, shall not exceed forty (40) per cent of the gross area of the 
lot; and shall connect with a municipal sanitary sewer. 

c. Any structure used for said purpose shall not exceed five (5) stories or forty-five (45) 
feet in height, but shall be constructed in accordance with the standards specified in the 
Town Building By-Law in Division No. 2 DEFINITIONS for "First-Class Building". The living 
floor area shall be no less than 20,000 square feet and shall include no less than fifty (50) 
sleeping units and public restaurant with a seating capacity of not less than one hundred (100) 
persons. No sleeping room shall be located below the mean finished grade of the ground adjoin- 
ing the building, and no sleeping units shall contain cooking facilities. 

d. Front Yard - No motel shall be permitted within fifty (50) feet of the sideline of each 
street on which the lot abuts; Side Yard - There shall be provided side yards of not less than 
fifty (50) feet in width, which may include a driveway and off-street parking areas; Rear Yard 
There shall be provided a rear yard of not less than fifty (50) feet; with the exception that 



109 



ARTICLE 85. (continued) 

no said structure shall be built within one hundred and fifty (150) feet of any dwelling whi cl 
is in existence, or under construction, at the time of construction of the aforementioned use; 

e. Accessory uses shall include, but not be limited to: restaurant, function rooms, news '<■' 
stands, cigar stores, drug stores, barber or beauty shops, and gift shops which may be conducl 
for the convenience of the occupants of the motel, provided there is no entrance to such plac« 
of business except from the inside of the building, and further provided there shall be no , 
exterior advertising display sign for such accessory uses except on the sign which advertises j*' 
the principal uses of the lot. i 

f. There shall be parking space for automobiles provided on the lot sufficient to furnish one' 
reasonably accessible automobile space, exclusive of circulation area, for each guest sleepinji 
room in the building (s), plus parking spaces as provided for in Schedule IV-3 Off-Street Pari] 
of this by-law for a restaurant and meeting rooms on the premises. i 

B. Except as otherwise provided, in a Limited Office and Motel District, the provisions of Sectic 
Subsection V-1, applicable to General Business District shall apply to a Limited Office and Motel 
District; provided, however, that any structure used for an office building shall not exceed five 
stories or forty-five (45) feet in height. 
By Petition. 

Motion by Mr. Courtney - since the motion follows article, Mr. Courtney had permission not to read it. 
Finance Committee disapproved the article. The Planning Board reported disapproval. Vote taken by stand 
ing Yes - 78 No- 218. Motion lost. 

ARTICLE 86. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A. District to Limited Garden Apartment District, the following de 
cribed parcel of land, to wit: 

Being the land now or formerly of Johnsons Realty Trust, designated as Lot 51 on a plan entitled "PI 
of Land in Wilmington, Mass., dated December 30, 1969, Dana F. Perkins and Sons, Inc., Civil Enginee 
and Surveyors, Reading-Lowell, Mass." being further bounded and described as follows: WESTERLY by 
West Street, 565 feet more or less; SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of Johnsons Realty Trust, 262 
feet more or less; SOUTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of Johnsons Realty Trust, 289.15 feet more 
or less; SOUTHERLY by land now or formerly of Minot and Ruth Anderson, 581.59 feet more or less; 
EASTERLY BY Interstate Route 93, 605 feet more or less; NORTHEASTERLY by land now or formerly of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad, 195 feet, more or less; NORTHERLY BY land now or formerly of Francis J. 
and Mary T. Ouellette, 45 feet more or less; and land now or formerly of Alfred and Louise S. 
Ouellette, 77 feet more or less; and land now or formerly of Wallace J. and Emma J. Williamson, 72 
feet more or less; and land now or formerly of Donald Jr. and Doris J. Milton, 72 feet more or less; 
and land now or formerly of Dorothy A. Burke, 76 feet more or less; and land now or formerly of John 
and Marie Connolly, 50 feet more or less; and land now or formerly of Robert F. and Barbara Doucette 
100 feet more or less; and land now or formerly of George E. and Katherine E. Reynolds, 114 feet mor^ 
or less; and land now or formerly of George B. Long and Kenneth C. Latham, 63 feet more or less; and 
land now or formerly of Harry G. and Annie Moore, 76 feet more or less; and land now or formerly of 
Richard D. Dearing, 101 feet more or less; and land now or formerly of Jack P. and Helen E. Moore by 
two courses, respectively of 26 feet more or less and 78 feet more or less; and land now or formerly 
of Francis X. and Doris E. Schultz, 126 feet more or less; and land now or formerly of Charles W. an( 
Nancy A. Vokey, 95 feet more or less. 

Containing 14.4 acres more or less, or to do anything in relation thereto. By Petition. 

Motion by Mr. Joseph F. Courtney that we pass over Article #86 and take no action. So voted. 

ARTICLE 87. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map by voting to rezone fj 
Single Residence A. District to Neighborhood Business District the parcel of land described as follows: 

"The land situated in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts and being shown as Lot 5-C'on Plan 
of Wilmington, drawn for James L. McLaughlin and Mary S. McLaughlin dated March 14, 1960 and 
recorded with Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 93, Plan 5, bounded North- 
easterly by Shawsheen Avenue, 87.67 feet; Northerly by a curved line marking the intersection of 
Shawsheen Avenue and Hopkins Street, 45.34 feet; Northwesterly by Hopkins Street, 166.65 feet; 
Southwesterly by lot 6 as shown on said plan, 113.45 feet; Southeasterly by Lot 5-B on said plan, 
196.45; containing 20,585 square feet of land, more or less; or do anything else in relation 
thereto. Request of J. Louis Theriault et al. 



110 



[CLE 87. (continued) 

.on by Mr. John W. McCann that the town vote to adopt the above Article 87 as laid out in said article, 
fining Board disapproved. Finance Committee disapproved. After some debate the vote was taken by standing 
- 222 No - 48 Motion so voted. 

Carl Backman, Jr. moved to adjourn the meeting. Voted to adjourn. Time of adjournment: 11:55 p.m. 
re were six hundred forty-eight (648) voters checked in at this meeting. 



5st; 



BY TAXATION 
BY TRANSFER 



(Mrs.)Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



$6,418,125.74 
196,661.95 



STATE PRIMARY - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - September 15, 1970 

sither of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

ETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
i town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, Tuesday 
Fifteenth Day of September, 1970 at 10:00 a.m., for the following purposes: 

bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
lowing offices: 



Senator in Congress 
Governor 

Lieutenant Governor 
Attorney General 
Secretary of the Commonwealth 
Treasurer and Receiver-General 
Auditor of the Commonwealth 
Representative in Congress 
Counci 1 lor 
Senator 

One Representative in General Court 
District Attorney 
Clerk of Courts 
Register of Deeds 
One County Commissioner 
One Sheriff 



For this Commonwealth 

For this Commonwealth 

For this Commonwealth 

For this Commonwealth 

For this Commonwealth 

For this Commonwealth 

For this Commonwealth 

Fifth Congressional District 

Sixth Councillor District 

Seventh Senatorial District 

Twenty-fifth Representative District 

Northern District 

Middlesex County 

Middlesex Northern District 

Middlesex County 



Middlesex County 

■eof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said meet- 



Ill 



Given under our hands this twenty-fourth day of August A.D. , 1970. 



S/Bruce MacDonald 
S /James R. Miceli 
S/ James F. Banda 
S/Wavie M. Drew 
S/Carl A. Backman, Jr. 

CONSTABLE'S RETURN OF SERVICE 



Selectmen of the 
Town of Wilmington 



September 4, 1970 



Middlesex, ss. Wilmington, Massachusetts 

I this day posted five attested copies of the within Warrant at the following locations: Town Hall Bulletfi 
Board, Town Library, U. S. Post Office, Fire Station and Police Station, all in said Wilmington. 

S/A. John Imbimbo 



Attest : 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 



All the ballots given in 


therefor were sorted, counted. 




a Q hv 1 fiU 


directed, and were for the following 


persons, namely; 






DEMOCRATIC 


PARTY 




RFPIIRT TCAN PARTY 




Senator in Congress 






•J c lid L. I./ 1. X xL COO 




Edward M. Kennedy 




1475 


Tn Q 1 h A ^ 1 1 1 H 1 n o" 


228 


Others 




1 


.Tohn .T- MoCaT"t"hv 


245 


Blanks 




450 




27 






1926 




juyj 


Governor 






Governor 




Maurice A, Donahue 




479 


Francis W. Sargent 


452 


Francis X. Bellotti 




505 


Blanks 


48 


Kenneth P. 0' Donne 11 




186 




500 


Kevin H. White 




704 






Blanks 




52 










1926 






Lieutenant Governor 






Lieutenant Governor 




Michael S. Dukakis 




729 


Donald R. Dwight 


412 


Rocco J. Antonelli 




276 


Blanks 


88 


John J. Craven, Jr. 




116 




500 


Kathleen T. Ryan Dacey 




160 






James S. McCormack 




512 






Blanks 




133 










1926 






Attorney General 






Attorney General 




Robert H. Quinn 




1598 


Donald L. Conn 


413 


Blanks 




328 


Blanks 


87 






1926 




500 


Secretary 






Secretary 




John F. X. Davoren 




1525 


Mary B. Newman 


395 


Blanks 




401 


Blanks 


105 






1926 




500 


Treasurer 






Treasurer 




Robert Q. Crane 




1548 


Frederick D. Hannon 


395 


Blanks 




378 


Blanks 


105 






1926 




500 


Audi tor 






Auditor 




Thaddeus Buczko 




1565 


Frank P. Bucci 


405 


Blanks 




361 


Blanks 


95 






1926 




500 



112 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



i ^ressman (Fifth District) 



chard Williams 
anks 



icillor (Sixth District) 



, Edward Bradley 
lomas Robbat 
Lanks 

itor (Seventh Middlesex District) 



lilip N. Bredesen 
lanks 

esentative in General Court 
Jenty-fifth Middlesex District) 



red F. Cain 
. John Imbimbo 
:hers 
lanks 

:rict Attorney (Northern District) 

Dhn J. Droney 

lanks 



I rk of Courts (Middlesex County) 
dward J, Sullivan 
harles L. Buckley 
lanks 



ister of Deeds 

iddlesex Northern District) 

rederick J, Finnegan 

thers 

lanks 

inty Commissioner 
iddlesex County) 
lohn L. Danehy 
ngelo Giangregorio 
arren D. Pierce, Jr. 
ohn D. Pirelli 
eith H. Weston 
lanks 

riff (Middlesex County-vacancy) 
ohn F. Dever, Jr. 
rthur R. Fitzpatrick 
,eonard M. Frisoli 
I'alter J. Sullivan 
lanks 



1457 
469 
1926 



1131 
427 
368 

1926 

1400 
526 
1926 



1012 
857 
4 
53 
1926 

1518 
408 
1926 

1080 
635 
211 

1926 



1465 
1 

460 
1926 



730 
112 
462 
88 
247 
287 
1926 

898 
141 
313 
472 
102 
1926 



Congressman (Fifth District) 
F, Bradford Morse 
Blanks 

Councillor (Sixth District) 
None 
Blanks 



Senator (Seventh Middlesex District) 
Ronald C. MacKenzie 
Blanks 



Representative in General Court 
(Twenty-fifth Middlesex District) 
James R. Mi cell 
Others 
Blanks 



District Attorney (Northern District) 
None 
Blanks 



Clerk of Courts (Middlesex County) 



None 
Blanks 



Register of Deeds 
(Middlesex Northern District) 
None 
Blanks 



County Commissioner 
Middlesex County) 



None 
Blanks 



455 
45 
500 



500 
500 



436 
64 
500 



411 
2 
87 
500 



500 
500 



500 
500 



500 



500 
500 



Sheriff (Middlesex County-vacancy) 
John J. Buckley 
Blanks 



412 



500 



polls closed at 8:00 p.m. 



re were Two thousand four hundred twenty-six (2,426) ballots cast. The Warden read the results of the 
wass of votes at 1:30 a.m. 



:est: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



113 



STATE ELECTION - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - November 3, 1970 



To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws c; 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified by law to vote 
Co meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Tuesday, the Third Day of November next at 5:45 o'clc: 
in the forenoon, the polls to be open at 6:00 a.m., and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for the election of t 
following: - Senator in Congress: Governor and Lieutenant Governor; Attorney General; Secretary; Treasurer 
Auditor; Representative in Congress; Councillor; Senator; Representative in General Court (1) District Att 
Northern District; Clerk of Courts; Register of Deeds; County Commissioner (1) County Sheriff (to fill 
vacancy); and vote YES or NO on the following questions: 

QUESTION NO. 1. PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was appro\ 
by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held July 15, 1968, received 155 votes in the 
affirmative and 98 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held May 14, 1969, received 
147 votes in the affirmative and 119 in the negative? YES 

NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment to the Constitution authorizes the Legislature to classify real property accor 
ing to uses, and authorizes the assessment, rating and taxation of real property at different rates in the 
different classes so established, but proportionately in the same class. The amendment further authorizes 
the granting of reasonable exemptions and abatements. 

QUESTION NO. 2. PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was approv 
by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held October 9, 1967, received 237 votes in th 
affirmative and in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held May 14, 1969, received 
votes in the affirmative and 4 in the negative. YES 

NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment to the Constitution abolishes the requirement that in order to vote in a state elec 
a person must have resided within the Commonwealth one year. If amended, the Constitution would require o 
that a voter have resided six months in the town or district in which he claims a right to vote. 

QUESTION NO. 3. PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was approv 
by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held October 9, 1967, received 142 votes in th 
affirmative and 102 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held May 14, 1969, receive 
222 votes in the affirmative and 49 in the negative? YES 

NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment to the Constitution reduces the minimum age for voting in a state election fro 
twenty-one to nineteen. 

QUESTION NO. 4. PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was approve 
by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held July 15, 1968, received 181 votes in the 
affirmative and 66 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held May 15, 1969, received: 
208 votes in the affirmative and 54 in the negative. YES 

NO 

SUMMARY 

The proposed amendment to the Constitution amends the existing constitutional provisions which direct 
division of the Commonwealth into 240 representative districts and 40 senatorial districts. It provides f( 
a census of the inhabitants of each city and town in the Commonwealth in the year 1971 and in every tenth ; 
thereafter. The census in 1971 is to be the basis for determining the representative and senatorial distr: 
for the ten-year period beginning January 1, 1975. Each subsequent census shall be the basis for determin: 
the districts for each ten-year period beginning the fourth January following each census, so that the cen; 
in 1981 will determine the districts as of January 1985. 



114 



The amendment provides that the house of representatives shall consist of two hundred and forty members 
the senate of forty members. In its first regular session following each census, the Legislature shall 
ide the Commonwealth into two hundred and forty representative districts of contiguous territory and forty 
itorial districts also of contiguous territory. Each representative district shall contain, as nearly as 
be, an equal number of inhabitants according to the census. Each senatorial district shall also contain 
learly as may be an equal number of inhabitants according to the census. A representative district shall 
unite two or more counties, towns, or cities or parts thereof, or a city and a town, or parts thereof, in 
district unless the same is unavoidable. Further, no town of less thwn six thousand inhabitants shall be 
Ided in forming representative districts. It is also provided that the County of Dukes County and 
:ucket County shall each be a representative district, notwithstanding the foregoing. The senatorial dis- 
Dts, each of which shall elect one Senator, fehall be formed without uniting two counties or parts of two or 
2 counties, unless the same is unavoidable. 

Each representative shall be an inhabitant of the district for which he is chosen at least one year im- 
Lately preceding his election, and each senator shall be an inhabitant of the district for which he is 
sen at the time of his election and shall have been an inhabitant of the Commonwealth for at least five 
rs immediately preceding his election. Any representative or senator who ceases to be an inhabitant of the 
Tionwealth shall cease to represent his district. 

The amendment also provides that the Legislature (1) may by law limit the time within which judicial pro- 
dings may be instituted calling in question any such division and (2) shall prescribe by law the manner of 
ling and conducting elections for the choice of representatives and of ascertaining their election. 

Finally, the amendment annuls the existing constitutional provisions with respect to apportionment of 
resentative and senatorial districts, although those provisions will remain in effect until January 1, 1975. 

3TI0N NO. 5. MULTIPLE CHOICE QUESTION 

Which one of the following do you prefer with reference to the future course of action by the United 
tes in Vietnam? To vote on this question mark a cross (X) in the square at the right of the subdivision 
prefer. DO NOT VOTE FOR MORE THAN ONE. 

A. Win a military victory. 

B. Withdraw our armed forces in accordance with a planned schedule. 

C. Withdraw all our armed forces immediately. 

STION NO. 6. 

A. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages (whisky, rum, 
, malt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages)? YES 

NO 

B. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of wines and malt beverages (wines and 
r, ale and all other malt beverages (wines and beer, ale and all other malt beverages)? YES 

NO 

C. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages in packages, 
called, not to be drunk on the premises? YES 

NO 

D. Shall licenses be granted in this town for the sale of all alcoholic beverages by hotels having a 
ing room capacity of not less than ninety-nine persons and lodging capacity of not less than^g^fty rooms': 

NO 

eof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon, 
the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

EN UNDER OUR HANDS AND SEAL OF SAID TOWN this 19th day of October, A. D., One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
lenty. 

s/Wavie M. Drew Board 
s /James F. Banda of 
s/Carl A. Backman, Jr. Selectmen 

irue copy: 

est: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 



:? 



115 



CONSTABLES' RETURN OF SERVICE 



Middlesex, ss. 



Wilmington, Massachusetts 



October 20, 1 



In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington, I this day posted five true and attested copies 
the within Warrant for State Election, at the followin'g locations: Town Hall Bulletin Board, Town Librar 
Police Station, Fire Station and the U. S. Post Office, all in said Wilmington. 



Attest ; 



s/A. John Imbimbo 

Constable of Wilmington 



The polls were opened at 6:00 a.m. and were closed at 8:00 p.m. The results of the election were read at 
4:30 a.m. 11/4/70. 

There were five thousand nine hundred and nine (5909) ballots cast. 

All the ballots given in therefor were sorted, counted, recorded and declaration thereof made, as by law 
directed, and were for the following persons, namely: 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 



GOVERNOR 



Edward M. Kennedy, Three thousand five hundred fifty-one 
Josiah A. Spaulding, Two thousand two hundred one 
Lawrence Gilfedder, Nine 
Mark R. Shaw, Sixteen 
Others, Two 



Francis W. Sargent, Three thousand four hundred six 
Kevin H. White, Two thousand ninety-nine 
Henning A. Blomen, Six 
John Charles Hedges, Two 
Blanks, Three hundred ninety-six 



LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 



Dona^ld R. Dwight, Three thousand four hundred six 

Michael S. Dukakis, Two thousand ninety-nine 

Albert E. Bates, Six 

Francis A. Votano, Three 

Blanks, Three hundred ninety-five 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 



Donald L. Conn, Two thousand two hundred sixty-five 
Robert H. Quinn, Three thousand four hundred fifty-nine 
Willy N. Hogseth, Thirty-five 
Blanks, One hundred fifty 



SECRETARY 



John F. X. Davoren, Three thousand one hundred twenty-seven 
Mary B, Newman, Two thousand five hundred forty- four 
Murvin A. Becker, Thirty-five 
Edgar F. Gaudet, Thirty-three 
Blanks, One hundred seventy 



TREASURER 



Robert Q. Crane, Three thousand eight hundred eighteen 
Frederick D. Hannon, One thousand seven hundred seventy-two 
John B. Lauder, Fifteen 
Roy K. Nelson, Thirty-five 
Others, Two 

Blanks, Two hundred sixty-seven 



3551 
2201 
9 
16 
130 
5909 

3406 
2099 
6 
2 

396 
5909 

3406 
2099 
6 
3 

395 
5909 

2265 
3459 
35 
150 
5909 

3127 
2544 
35 
33 
170 
5909 



3818 
1772 
15 
35 
2 

267 
5909 



116 



TOR 



Thaddeus Buczko, Three thousand eight hundred seventy-five 

Frank P. Bucci , One thousand six 

Raymond J. Gray, Thirty 

Roger I. Williams, Forty-eight 

Blanks, Two hundred fifty 



JRESSMAN 



Fifth District 



F. Bradford Morse, Three thousand seven hundred sixty-eight 
Richard Williams, One thousand nine hundred ninety-eight 
Blanks, One hundred forty-three 

ICILLOR - Sixth District 



TOR 



G. Edward Bradley, Four thousand two hundred thirty-five 
Others, Four 

Blanks, One thousand six hundred seventy 
Seventh Middlesex District 



Ronald C. MacKenzie, Three thousand seven hundred three 
Philip N. Bredesen, Two thousand twelve 
Blanks, One hundred ninety-four 

lESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - Twenty-fifth Middlesex District 



Fred F. Cain, Three thousand one hundred seventy-three 
James R. Mi cell, Two thousand six hundred thirty-eight 
Others, Seven 
Blanks, Ninety-one 

CRICT ATTORNEY - Northern District 



John J. Droney, Four thousand four hundred ninety-three 
Others, Four 

Blanks, One thousand four hundred twelve ■ 

m OF COURTS - Middlesex County 

Edward J. Sullivan, Four thousand three hundred seventy 
Blanks, One thousand five hundred thirty-seven 
Others 

[S TER OF DEEDS - Middlesex Northern District 

Frederick J.Finnegan, Four thousand two hundred seventy-seven 
Others, Two 

Blanks, One thousand six hundred thirty 

MTY COMMISSIONER - Middlesex County 

John L. Danehy, Four thousand one hundred sixty-three 
Others, Three 

Blanks, One thousand seven hundred forty-three 

RIFF - Middlesex County (to fill vacancy) 

John J. Buckley, Two thousand eight hundred ninety-three 
John F. Dever, Jr., Two thousand seven hundred sixty-nine 
Blanks, Two hundred forty-seven 



3875 
1706 
30 
48 
250 
5909 

3768 
1998 
143 
5909 

4235 
4 

1670 
5909 

3703 
2012 
194 
5909 



3173 
2638 
7 

91^ 

5909 

4493 
4 

1412 
5909 

4370 
1537 

2_ 

5909 

4277 
2 

1630 
5909 



4163 

3 

1743 
5909 

2893 
2769 
247 
5909 



S TION #1 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, whic 
the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held July 15, 1968, received 155 v 
irmative and 98 in the negative, and in a joint session of the two branches held May 14, 19 
votes in the affirmative and 119 in the negative? (See summary in Warrant) 

1640 . 
3542 
727 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



5909 



117 



QUESTION #2 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was appro 
by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held October 9, 1967, received 237 votes in t 



affirmative and in the negative, 
262 votes in the affirmative and 4 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



and in a joint session of the two branches held May 14, 
in the negative? (See summary in Warrant) 



1969, received 

3963 
1282 
664 



5909 



QUESTION #3 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the constitution summarized below, which was appro 
by the General Court in a joint session of the two branches held October 9, 1967, received 142 votes in t 



affirmative and 102 in the negative, and in a joint session of the 
222 votes in the affirmative and 49 in the negative? (See summary 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



QUESTION #4 

Do you approve the 
by the General Court in 
affirmative and 66 in the negative, 
208 votes in the affirmative and 54 

Yes 

No 

Blanks 



adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized 
a joint session of the two branches held July 15, 1968, 



two branches held May 14, 1969, receiV' 
in Warrant) 

3045 
2251 
613 
5909 

below, which was approvedi 
received 181 votes in the' 



and in a joint session of the two branches held May 15, 1969, receivei 
in the negative? (See summary in Warrant) 

2629 
1964 
1316 
5909 



QUESTION #5 

Which one of the following do you prefer with reference to the future course of action by the 
States in Vietnam? (Vote for one) 

A. Win a military victory 775 

B. Withdraw our armed forces in accordance with a planned schedule 2909 

C. Withdraw all our armed forces immediately 1848 
Blanks 377 

5909 

QUESTION #6 

A. Shall 
beverages 
Yes 
No 

Blanks 

B. Shall 
beverages 
Yes 
No 

Blanks 

C. Shall 
beverages 
Yes 
No 

Blanks 



licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of all alcoholic 
(whisky, rum, gin, malt beverages, wines and all other alcoholic beverages)? 



licenses be granted in this town for the sale therein of wines and malt 
(wines and beer, ale and all other malt beverages)? 



licenses be granted in this 
in packages, so called, not 



town for the sale therein of all alcoholic 
to be drunk on the premises? 



D. Shall licenses be granted in this town for 
by hotels having a dining room capacity of not 
lodging capacity of not less than fifty rooms? 
Yes 
No 

Blanks 



the sale of all alcoholic beverages 
less than ninety-nine persons and 



2399 
2830 
680 
5909 



2423 
2555 
■931 
5909 



4447 
929 
533 
5909 



3052 
2158 
699 
5909 



118 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - November 21, 1970 
W I TH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



Either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

ETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws of 
i Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
airs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium on Saturday, the twenty-first day of November 1970 
1:00 p.m. to consider and act on the following Articles: 

ICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to participate in a Regional Drug Abuse Control Program in conjunc- 
n with the City of Lowell and other Greater Lowell towns and in connection thereto, to see if the Town 
1 vote to raise and appropriate, borrow or transfer from available funds a sum of money to be used for 
s purpose and said sum to be administered under the Drug Committee voted at the Adjourned Annual Town 
ting on March 21, 1970, or do anything in relation thereto. 

ion by Mr. Bruce MacDonald: "I move that the Town vote to participate in a Regional Drug Abuse Control 
gram in conjunction with the City of Lowell and other Greater Lowell towns, and that the Town vote to 
iropriate the sum of $8,200 by transferring Three Thousand One Hundred and Eighty-five Dollars and Forty- 
e cents (3,185.45) from Account #961 - Additional Employees Public Buildings; by transferring Two Thousand 
e Hundred and Fifty Dollars (2,550.00) from Account #963 - Additional Employees Highway; by transferring 
Thousand Two Hundred and Seventy-four Dollars and Fifty Cents ($2,274.50) from Account y^964 - Additional 
loyees Police; by transferring One Hundred and Ninety Dollars and Five Cents ($190.05) from Account #920 
in Report; to be used for this purpose and administered under the Drug Committee voted at the Adjourned 
ual Town Meeting on March 21, 1970." Finance Committee approved $8,200. 

indment by Mr. Christian G, Bachman: "I move to amend the motion by adding after March 21, 1970, the words 
lovided such participation shall be on a yearly basis and may be terminated at any time after the first 
r without penalty'." Amendment voted unanimously. Main motion as amended voted unanimously. 

ICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of acquiring 

following described parcel of land for the construction of a public school or schools thereon and to de- 
mine how said appropriation shall be raised whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by 
rowing or otherwise and further to see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take 
eminent domain or receive as a gift for said purposes, a certain parcel of land located on Burlington 
inue being shown as Lot B on "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. September 17, 1970, Dana F. Perkins & Sons, 
., Surveyors", said parcel being bounded and described as follows: 
Southwesterly - by Burlington Avenue, sixty and 46/100 (60.46 feet; 

Southeasterly - by land now or formerly of Nelson F. and Virginia Huntley, one hundred twenty-one 
and 20/100 (121.20) feet; 

Southerly - still by land now or formerly of Nelson F. and Virginia Huntley by two distances 
measuring respectively. Eighty-one and 73/100 (81.73) feet and thirty-eight and 97/100 (38.97) feet; 
Southerly - by land now or formerly of George and Frances Keough, fifty-six and 95/100 (56.95) feet, 
thirty-two and 01/100 (32.01) feet, and forty and 02/100 (40.02) feet; 

Southeasterly - still by land of George and Frances Keough, forty-four and 85/100 (44.85) feet; 
Southeasterly, Easterly and Northeasterly - by land of the Wilmington Housing Authority, by several 
distances measuring respectively, forty-six and 92/100 (46.92) feet, thirty-five and 88/100 (35.88) 
feet, twenty-eight and 32/100 (28.32) feet, one hundred ninety-one and 69/100 (191.69) feet, one 
hundred sixty-three and 77/100 (163.77) feet, one hundred seventy-nine and 86/100 (179.86) feet, 
thirty-two and 41/100 (32.41) feet, twenty-three and 30/100 (23.30) feet; 

Northeasterly - by land of the Wilmington Housing Authority and by John A. White, Jr. and Elizabeth 
Huntley, eighty-six and 84/100 (86.84) feet; 

Northeasterly and southeasterly - by land of John A. White, Jr. and Elizabeth Huntley, seventy- 
five and 90/100 (75.90) feet, ninety-seven and 28/100 (97.28) feet, four hundred and 11/100 (400.11) 
feet and seventy-nine and 19/100 (79.19) feet; 

Easterly - by Oak Court and land of Norman H. and Eleanor N. Johnson, seventy-five and 73/100 
(75.73) feet; 

Northeasterly - still by land of Norman H. and Eleanor N. Johnson by several distances measuring 
respectively, forty-two and 70/100 (42.70) feet and fifty-one and 89/100 (51.89) feet; 
Southeasterly - by land of Francis W. and Amy T. Lake, Beech Court, Joseph F. and Mary Forbes, 
Joseph A. and Jennie A. Fagone and Tower Realty Tr., by several distances measuring respectively; 
one hundred twenty-three and 04/100 (123.04) feet, eighty and 13/100 (80.13) feet, one hundred 



119 



I( 



il 



ARTICLE 2. (continued) fl 
thirty-five 72/100 (135.72) feet, one hundred thirty-eight and 70/100 (138.70) feet, ninety-six and 
31/100 (96.31) feet, eighty-one and 99/100 (81.99) feet, fifty and 75/100 (50.75) feet; 
Northeasterly - by Ivy Court, by land of George E. Gates, Margaret C. Arditto, Elizabeth T. Fritsch, 
Birch Road and by other land of the Town of Wilmington, by several distances, measuring respectively, 
one hundred seventy-two and 18/100 (172.18) feet, one hundred fourteen and 54/100 (114.54) feet, 
thirty-nine and 42/100 (39.42) feet, one hundred ninety-one and 65/100 (191.65 feet, one hundred 
forty-seven and 95/100 (147.95) feet, eighty-four and 65/100 (84.65) feet, forty-six and 70/100 

(46.70) feet, eighty and 31/100 (80.31) feet, one hundred thirty-four and 58/100 (134.58) feet, 
one hundred fifty-one and 18/100 (151.18) feet, one hundred twenty-two and 64/100 (122.64) feet; 
Northwesterly - by land of the Town of Wilmington by several distances measuring respectively, 
two hundred seven and 49/100 (207.49) feet, one hundred ninety and 36/100 (190.36) feet, one 
hundred thirty-four and 19/100 (134.19) feet, one hundred eighty-two and 05/100 (182.05) feet, 
fifty-eight and 22/100 (58.22) feet, forty-three and 20/100 (43.20) feet, one hundred twenty and 
78/100 (120.78) feet, and one hundred sixty-eight and 35/100 (168.35) feet; 

Westerly and Southwesterly - by land of Peter Addrisi and Paul F. and Charlotte A. Minghalla by 
several distances measuring respectively, twenty-four and 79/100 (24.79) feet, twenty-three and 
06/100 (23.06) feet, fifty-one and 22/100 (51.22) feet, thirty-six and 91/100 (36.91) feet, one 
hundred two and 15/100 (102,15) feet, sixty-three and 31/100 (63.31) feet and sixty-nine and 59/100 
(69.59) feet; 

Northerly - still by land of Paul F. and Charlotte A. Minghalla, by several distances measuring re- 
spectively, eighty-six and 45/100 (86.45) feet, sixty-nine and 62/100 (69.62) feet and seventy-three 
and 56/100 (73.56) feet; 

Westerly - by land of Heinz W. and Claire T. H. Stemmler, ninety and 73/100 (90.73) feet; 
Southwesterly - by land of Leslie H. and Ethel A. Carlton and Leonard, John F. and Margaret Coyne, 
one hundred seventy-seven and 48/100 (177.48) feet; 

Southeasterly - by land of Victor A. and Patricia DuBois, Jr., Fifty-one and 29/100 (51.29) feet; 
Southerly - still by land of Victor A. and Patricia DuBois, Jr., sixty-four and 82/100 (64.82) feet; 
Southwesterly - still by land of Victor A. and Patricia DuBois, Jr., one hundred twenty-five (125) 
feet and fourteen and 21/100 (14.21) feet; 

Southerly - by land of Anthony E. and Irene Valente, one hundred twenty-four and 89/100 (123.89 
feet ; 

Westerly - still by land of Anthony E. and Irene Valente, one hundred eighty-one and 47/100 (181.47) 
feet ; 

Southerly, by Burlington Avenue by several distances measuring respectively, thirty-nine and 69/100 
(39.69) feet, one hundred eleven and 08/100 (111.08) feet and twenty-five (25) feet; 
Southeasterly - by Lot A, one hundred fifty-five (155) feet; 
Southerly - still by Lot A, ninety (90) feet; 
Easterly - still by Lot A, one hundred eighty-two (182) feet; 

Southerly - still by Lot A, by several distances measuring respectively, forty-eight and 71/100 

(48.71) feet, one hundred fifty-four and 46/100 (154.46) feet and one hundred eighty-nine and 59/100 
(189.59) feet; 

Northwesterly - still by Lot A, two hundred and 85/100 (200.85) feet; 
Northerly - still by Lot A, thirty-seven and 23/100 (37.23) feet; 

Northwesterly - still by Lot A, one hundred twenty-five and 56/100 (125.56) feet; 

Southwesterly - by Burlington Avenue by several distances measuring respectively, forty-six and 24/100 
feet, sixty-two and 49/100 (62.49) feet and one hundred forty-one and 40/100 (141.40) feet; 
Southeasterly - by land of Anthony J. DelTorto, one hundred seventy-three and 41/100 (173.41)feet; 
Southerly - by land of Anthony J. DelTorto and Walter H. and Barbara Ann Pierce, Three hundred thirty— i] 



five and 93/100 (335.93) feet; 
Southwesterly - still by land of Walter H, 
(149.11) feet; 

Northwesterly - still by land of Walter H. 



t 



and Barbara Ann Pierce, one hundred forty-nine and 11/100 

and Barbara Ann Pierce, two hundred and thirty 0230) feet. 
Said Lot B contains 54.28 acres, more or less; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Arnold F. Lanni : "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $130,000 for the purpoi 
of acquiring the following described parcel of land for the construction of a public school or schools 
thereon and to meet said appropriation that the sum of Three Thousand and Nine Hundred Dollars ($3,900.00) 
transferred from Account #960 - 1970 Salary Adjustments and Additional Costs, and the treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or sums in the amount of $126,100,001 
and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44, and further that the Town vote to author 
the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift for said purposes a certain parcel ■ 
land located on Burlington Avenue being shown as Lot B on "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., September 17 



120 



LITER 2. (continued) 

I , Dana F. Perkins & Sons, Inc., Surveyors", said parcel being bounded and described as follows: - 
gaining portion of motion is exactly described in article above. There being no objections the descrip- 
I of the land was dispensed with.) The Finance Committee disapproved this motion. After more than one 
i\j of discussion, the question was called for. Yes - 375 No - 45 Motion carries. 

I 

>■': on main motion: Yes - 123 No - 359 Motion lost. 

L'j CLE 3. To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for preparing preliminary 
.!is and cost estimates for the construction of a new high school and determine how the appropriation shall 
aised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise and to authorize 
iij instruct the Permanent Building Committee to enter into contracts and do all things that are necessary or 
K dental for preparing preliminary plans and cost estimates and to instruct the Permanent Building 
uiittee to report the results to an annual or special Town Meeting as soon as it is practical, or do any- 
i ig in relation thereto. 

I on by Mr. John Brooks: "I move to pass over this article and take no action thereon." Motion 
laimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

:r Article #3 was dispensed with a voter called for reconsideration of Article #2. Standing vote taken: 
! - 39 No - 276 Lost. 

I'.CLE 4. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds or 
sorrowing or otherwise and appropriate for the use of the Permanent Building Committee for the preparation 
'preliminary plans and cost estimates for the construction of an addition to the Police Station on Adelaide 
:jet or do anything in relation thereto. Request of Chief of Police and the Permanent Building Committee. 

II. on by Mr. James Banda : "I move that the Town vote to transfer the sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000.00) 
'a Account #1220 - Purchase Land New Intermediate School, and appropriate for the use of the Permanent 
i.ding Committee for the preparation of preliminary plans and cost estimates for the construction of an 
L.tion to the Police Station on Adelaide Street.", The Finance Committee approved the transfer of $1,000. 
*i taken by voice. Motion carried. 

:;CLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section 1-2 of the Zoning By-Law by the addition of the 
'jlowing, or do anything else in relation thereto: 

7. High Density Traffic Business Districts (HDTB) 

ion by Mr. Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section 1-2 of the Zoning By-Law by the addition 
the following: 

7. High Density Traffic Business Districts (HDTB)." 

ance Committee approved the motion. The Planning Board filed a report. A lengthy discussion follows. 
! Simon Cutter called for the question. Yes - 207 No - 11 Motion carried. More discussion followed, 
tiding vote taken: Yes - 184 No - 48 Motion carried. 

' Vitale asked for reconsideration of Article #5. Withdrew motion. 

ICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section II Definitions of the Zoning By-Law by the addition 
the following, or do anything else in relation thereto: 

13. Drive-in Restaurant. A restaurant or eating place in which food and/or beverages are served to 
persons for consumption in automobiles or other vehicles, regardless of whether such service is ex- 
clusive or in addition to indoor service. 

ion by Mr. William Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section II Definitions of the Zoning 
Law by the addition of the following: 

13. Drive-in Restaurant. A restaurant or eating place in which food and/or beverages are served to 
persons for consumption in automobiles or other vehicles, regardless of whether such service is 
exclusive of or in addition to indoor service." 

ance Committee approved. The Planning Board filed a report. Standing vote taken: Yes - 171 No - 3 
ion carried. 



121 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section III of the Zoning By-law by the addition of the 
following, or do anything else in relation thereto: 

III-5. Uses in High Density Traffic Business Districts 

A. In a High Density Traffic Business District, the following uses are hereby permitted. 

1. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption on the premises of food or non-alcoholi 
beverages, provided that no dancing is permitted and no entertainment is furnished. 

2. Commercial parking lot or parking garage; filling or service station and any accessory use 
thereof; salesroom for new automobiles; open lot for parking or sale of new or used automobiles 
when operated in connection with, and on the same site as, such as salesroom; salesroom for boats, 
trailers, trucks, farm implements or farm machinery. 

3. Indoor amusement or recreation place or place of assembly, provided that the building is so 
insulated and maintained as to confine noise to the premises. 

4. Showroom, provided that storage is limited to floor samples. 

5. Any business for the sale of unused merchandise at retail on the premises, including the sale 
of furniture and other bulk items. 

6. Hotel or motel, subject to the following conditions. 

a. for the purpose of this bylaw, a motel shall be defined as a structure or structures con- 
taining sleeping rooms of one or more rooms attached to each other, and intended to be rented ; 
for brief periods of time for the accommodation of travelers or tourists, with a public 
restaurant as an accessory use attached. 

b. The minimum lot size shall be 120,000 square feet, having a minimum frontage of 300 feet J 
along a public way of the Town. The gross ground floor area of all buildings, including 
covered walkways and carports, shall not exceed forty (40) 

percent of the gross of the lot; and shall connect with a municipal sanitary sewer. 

c. Any structure used for said purpose shall not exceed two and one half (2^) stories or 
t)ii rty-eight (38) feet in height, but shall be constructed in accordance with the standards 
specified in the Town Building By-law in Division No. 2 DEFINITIONS for 'First Class Building'. ■ 
The living floor area shall be no less than 20,000 square feet and square fif^et and shall 
include no less than fifty (50) sleeping units and public restaurant with a seating capacity i 
of not less than (100) persons. No sleeping room shall be located below the mean finished | 
grade of the ground adjoining the building, and no sleeping unit shall contain cooking 
facilities. | 

d. Front Yard - No motel shall be permitted within one hundred (100) feet of the sideline : 
of each street on which the lot abuts; Side Yard - There shall be provided side yards of ! 
not less than fifty (50) feet in width, which may include a driveway; Rear Yard - There ' 
shall be provided a rear yard of not less than fifty (50) feet; with the exception that no } 
said structure shall be built within one hundred and fifty (150) feet of any dwelling which j 
is in existence, or under construction, at the time of construction of the aforementioned | 
uses . * 

e. Accessory uses shall include, but not be limited to restaurant, function rooms, news 
stands, cigar stores, drug stores, barber or beauty shops and gift shops which may be con- Ij 
ducted for the convenience of the occupants of the motel, provided there is no entrance to | 
such place of business except from the inside of the building, and further provided, there | 
shall be no exterior advertising display for such accessory uses except on the sign which 
advertises the principal use of the lot. 

f. There shall be parking space for automobiles provided on the lot sufficient to furnish 
one (1) reasonably accessible automobile space, exclusive of circulation area, for each 
guest sleeping room in the building(s), plus parking spaces as provided for in Schedule IV-3 
Off Street Parking of this By-Law for a restaurant and meeting rooms on the premises. 

B. In a Kigh Density Traffic Business District, the following uses are permitted as authorized on appf 
by the Board of Appeals and as specified in Section VIII-2B hereinafter. 

1. Repair garage for vehicles in use, excluding junk storage or salvage operations, provided that 
such use will not interfere with the safety of vehicular and pedestrian movement in the vicinity, 
and that the building is so insulated and maintained as to confine noise to the premises. 

a. Open lot for parking or sale of used automobiles not operated in connection with a ' 
salesroom for new automobiles. 

2. Drive-in restaurant or eating place. 



122 



[CLE 7. (continued) 

3. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption on the premises of food or non-alcoholic 
beverages . 

.on by Mr. William Hooper: "I move to amend Section III of the Zoning By-law by the addition of the 
towing: (Since the motion followed exactly the words in the article above, the moderator, hearing no 
action, dispensed with further reading of the motion.) The Planning Board filed a report. 

idment by Mr. William Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section III of the Zoning By-law by 
addition of the following: 

•5. Uses in High Density Traffic Business Districts 

V. In a High Density Traffic Business District, the following uses are hereby permitted: 

1. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption on the premises of food or non-alccholi c 
beverages, provided that no dancing is permitted and no entertainment is furnished. 

2. Commercial parking lot or parking garage; filling or service station and any accessory use 
thereof . 

3. In a High Density Traffic Business District, the following uses are permitted as authorized on 
appeal by the Board of Appeals and as specified in Section VIII-2B hereinafter. 

1. Repair garage for vehicles in use, excluding junk storage or salvage operations-, provided that 
such use will not interfere with the safety of vehicular and pedestrian movement in the vicinity, 
and that the building is so insulated and maintained as to confine noise to the premises. 

a. Open lot for parking or sale of used automobiles not operated in connection with a sales- 
room for new automobiles. 

2. Drive-in restaurant or eating place. 

I 3. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption on the premises of food or non-alcoholic 
beverages which may provide dancing and/or entertainment. 

idment carried by voice vote. Main motion as am'ended: Standing Yes - 159 No - 12 Carried. 

ICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section VIII-2 Appeal B. i. of the Zoning By-law by insert- 

1 the numerals and letter "III-5 B" immediately following "III-4 B", so that the first sentence reads as 
lows: or do anything else in relation thereto. 

i. Authorize uses under Sections III-l B, III - 2 B, III - 3 B, III - 4 B and III - 5 B, as specified 
therein, after a report thereon from the Town Planning Board. 

ion by Mr. Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section VIII-2 Appeal B. i. of the Zoning By-law 
inserting the numerals and letter "III-5 B" immediately following "III-4 B", so that the first sentence 
Is as follows: 

i. Authorize uses under Sections III- 1 B, III - 2 B, III - 3 B, III - 4 B, III - 5 B, as specified 
thereto, after a report thereon from the Town Planning Board." 

ance Committee approved. The Planning Board filed a report. Vote taken by standing: Yes - 142 No - 2 

2 carried. 

'ICLE 9. To see if- the town will vote to amend Section V Height, Area and Yard requirements of the 
ing By-law by the addition of the following new requirements; or do anything else in relation thereto. 

District - High Density Traffic Business (HDTB) , Minimum Lot Area for Use Permitted without Appeal - 
40,000 sq. ft.; Minimum Lot Area for Use Permitted on Appeal - 40,000 sq. ft.; Minimum Lot Frontage 
for Use permitted without appeal - 200 ft.; Minimum Lot Frontage for use permitted on Appeal - 200 ft.; 
Maximum Height - 2^ stories or 38 ft.; Minimum Set-back from Center Line of Street - 60 ft.; Minimum 
Front Yard Depth - 50 ft.; Minimum width for each Side Yard - 25 ft.; Minimum Rear Yard Depth - 60 
ft.; Minimum Lot Depth - 200 ft.; Maximum Lot Coverage for Buildings or Structures - 25%. 

lion by Mr. Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section V Height, Area and Yard requirements 
the Zoning By-law by the addition of the following new requirements: Motion identical to Article #9 
ve. Finance Committee approved. Planning Board filed a report. 

ed: Yes-127 No-6 Carried. 



123 



After Article #9 was dispensed with, Mr. Richard Barry asked that Article #25 be taken out of order. So 
voted . 

A quorum was questioned. A count showed 166 voters present. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, by taxation, by transf^ 
of available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the purchase and installation of a new heating system i; 
the Highway Garage, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Sterling C, Morris: "I move that the Town vote to purchase and install a new heating systei 
in the Highway Garage, and that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $10,200 by transferring from ii 
Account #960 - 1970 Salary Adjustments and Additional Costs the sum of $10,200 for this purpose." Financi 
Committee approved $10,000. Vote was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the town will vote to amend Section III-l. Uses in Rural, Single Residence A and 
Single Residence B Districts of the Zoning By-law by the deletion of the following: or do anything else it 
relation thereto. 

B. 5. Clubhouse, lodge, or other non-profit recreational, social, educational or civic use operated; 
for members, excluding outdoor use of firearms. i 

Motion by Mr. MacDonald: "I move to pass over this article and take no action thereon." Vote taken by vo? 
Chair in doubt. Vote taken by standing: Yes - 137 No - 14 Motion carried. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section III-2 Uses in Neighborhood Business Districts i 
the Zoning By-law by the deletion of the following, or do anything else in relation thereto. 

A. 4. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption on the premises of food or non- 
alcoholic beverages, provided that no dancing is permitted and no entertainment is furnished. 

Motion by Mr. Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section III-2 Uses in Neighborhood Business ] 
Districts of the Zoning By-law by deletion of the following: ^ 

A, 4. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption on the premises of food or non-alcohol: 
beverages, provided that no dancing is permitted and no entertainment is furnished." 

Finance Committee approved. The Planning Board filed a report. Vote taken by voice and it was unanimous; 
and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section III-3 Uses in General Business Districts of th« 

Zoning By-law by the deletion of the following or do anything else in relation thereto. 

A. 3. Hotel, Motel subject to the following conditions, which shall apply to motels only: 

a. For the purpose of this by-law, a motel shall be defined as a structure or structures con- 
taining sleeping rooms of one or more rooms attached to each other, and intended to be rented 
for brief periods of time for the accommodation of travelers or tourists, with a public 
restaurant as an accessory use attached. 

b. The minimum lot size shall be 120,000 square feet, having a minimum frontage of 300 feet 
along a public way of the Town. The gross ground floor area of all buildings, including 
covered walkways and carports, shall not exceed forty (40) percent of the gross of the lot; ane 
shall connect with a municipal sanitary sewer. 

c. Any structure used for said purpose shall not exceed two and one-half (2%) stories or 
thirty-eight (38) feet in height, but shall be constructed in accordance with the standards 
specified in the Town Building By-Law in Division No. 2 DEFINITIONS for 'First Class Building . 
The living floor area shall be no less than 20,000 square feet and shall include no less than 
fifty (50) sleeping units and public restaurant with a seating capacity of not less than (100) 
one hundred persons. No sleeping room shall be located below the mean finished grade of the 
ground adjoining the building, and no sleeping unit shall contain cooking facilities. 

d. Front Yard - No motel shall be permitted within one hundred (100) feet of the sideline of 
each street on which the lot abuts; Side Yard - There shall be provided side yards of not 
less than fifty (50) feet in width, which may include a driveway; Rear Yard - There shall be 
provided a rear yard of not less than fifty (50) feet; with the exception that no said 
structure shall be built within one hundred and fifty (150) feet of any dwelling which is in 
existence, or under construction, at the time of construction of the aforementioned uses. 

124 



i[CLE 12. (continued) 

e. Accessory uses shall include, but not be limited to, restaurant, function rooms, news 
stands, cigar stores, drug stores, barber or beauty shops, and gift shops which may be con- 
ducted for the convenience of the occupants of the motel, provided there is no entrance to 
such place of business except from the inside of the building, and further provided, there 
shall be no exterior advertising display for such accessory uses except on the sign which 
advertises the principal use of the lot. 

f. There shall be parking space for automobiles provided on the lot usfficient to furnish 
I (1) reasonably accessible automobile space, exclusive of circulation area, for each guest 

sleeping room in the building(s), plus parking spaces as provided for in Schedule IV-3 
! Off-Street Parking of this By-law for a restaurant and meeting rooms on the premises. 

5. Any business for the sale of unused merchandise at retail on the premises, including the sale of 
I furniture and other bulk items. 

6. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption on the premises of food or non-alcoholic 
I beverages. 

13. Commercial parking lot or parking garage, filling or service station, salesroom for new auto- 
mobiles, open: lot for parking or sale of new or used automobiles when operated in connection with, 
and on the same site as, such a salesroom, salesroom for boats, trailers, trucks, farm implements or 
farm machinery. 

14. Indoor amusement or recreation place or place of assembly provided that the building is so in- 
sulated and maintained as to confine noise to the premises. 

15. Showroom, provided that storage is limited to floor samples. 

. 3. Repair garage for vehicles in use, excluding junk storage or salvage operations provided that such 
use will not interfere with the safety of vehicular and pedestrian movement in the vicinity, and that 
the building is so insulated and maintained as to confine noise to the premises. 

a. Open lot for parking or sale of used automobiles not operated in connection with a 
salesroom for new automobiles. 

ion by Mr. William Hooper: "I move to amend Section III-3 Uses in General Business Districts of the 
ing By-Law by the deletion of the following: 

ce the motion followed exactly the wording in Article 12 above further reading was dispensed with, 
ance Committee approved. Planning board filed a report. 

ndment by Mr. Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section III-3 Uses in General Business Districts 
the Zoning By-Law by the deletion of the following: 

6. Restaurant or other place for the sale and consumption of the premises of food or non-alcoholic 
beverages. 

13. Commercial parking lot or parking garage, filling or service station, and any accessory use 
thereof . 

. 3. Repair garage for vehicles in use, excluding junk storage or salvage operations provided that such 
use will not interfere with the safety of vehicular and pedestrian movement in the vicinity, and that 
the building is so insulated and maintain ed as to confine noise to the premises. 

a. Open lot for parking or sale of used automobiles not operated in connection with a salesroom 
for new automobiles." 

vote on the amendment was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. The vote on the Main motion as 
inded was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

ICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section III-4 Uses in Industrial Districts of the Zoning 
,Law by the deletion of the following, or do anything else in relation thereto. 

. 3. Repair garage for vehicles in use excluding junk storage or salvage operations. 

iion by Mr. Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section II 1-4 Uses in Industrial Districts of the 
iiing By-Law by the deletion of the following: 



125 



ARTICLE 13. (continued) 

A, 3. Repair garage for vehicles in use excluding junk storage or salvage operations." 
Finance Committee approved. The Planning Board filed a report. 
The vote on the motion was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section IV-4 Screening of Open Uses of the Zoning By-] 
by the addition of the words "High Density Traffic Business District" immediately following the words 
"Industrial District" in the first sentence, so that the provisions of this section will apply to High 
Density Traffic Business Districts: or do anything else in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. William Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section IV-4 Screening of Open Uses of 
Zoning By-law by the addition of the words "High Density Traffic Business District" immediately following 
the words "Industrial District" in the first sentence, so that the provisions of this section will apply 
High Density Traffic Business Districts." Finance Committee approved. The Planning Board filed a report 
The vote on the motion was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section V-4 C. of the Zoning By-law with the addition 
the words "High Density Traffic Business District" immediately following the words "Industrial District",- 
so that the provisions of this section will apply to High Density Traffic Business Districts; or do anytH 
else in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Hooper: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section V-4 C. of the Zoning By-law with the 
addition of the words "High Density Traffic Business District" immediately following the words "Industrial 
District", so that the provisions of this section will apply to High Density Traffic Business Districts."' 
Finance Committee approved. The Planning Board filed a report. The vote on the motion was unanimous anci 
declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to amend Section III-3 B.2. of the Zoning By-law by the additia 
of the words "other than a dwelling", immediately following the words "any other use", so that the senteri 
reads as follows: ' 
"2. Any other use, other than a dwelling, permitted on appeal in a Neighborhood Business District, 
as permitted therein, and not specifically enumerated in Section III-3A." or do anything in relation , 
thereto. \ 

Motion by Mr. Morton Grant: "I move that the Town vote to amend Section III-3.B,2. of the Zoning By-law bl 
the addition of the words "other than a dwelling', immediately following the words "any other use", so tW' 
the sentence reads as follows: 

"2. Any other use, other than a dwelling, permitted on appeal in a Neighborhood Business District, as 

permitted therein, and not specifically enumerated in Section III-3A." 
Finance Committee approved. The Planning Board filed a report. The vote on the motion was unanimous and 
declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to amend the action taken on Article 44 of the March 21, 1970 
Annual Town Meeting by further authorizing the expenditure of funds for the construction of said way, or 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to amend the action taken on Article 44 of the 
March 21, 1970 Annual Town Meeting by inserting after the words "the sum of $38,000" the following: for 
purpose of constructing said way, so that the vote as amended will read: I move that the Town vote for ti 
construction of West Street in accordance with the Layout of said West Street from Lowell Street to the 
improved section as laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 82, and autho 
the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope and drainage or other easement* 
as may be necessary to effect the purpose of the Article, and that the Town vote to raise and appropriates 
the sum of $38,000 for the purpose of constructing said way and for the payment of any damages resulting 
from the taking of land and slope easements and other easements, $1,900 of said sum to be raised by taxat 
and that the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen be and hereby is authorized to borrow a sum or 
sums in the amount of $36,100 and to issue bonds or notes therefor as authorized by Chapter 44 of the 
General Laws." Finance Committee approved. The vote on the motion was unanimous and so declared by the 
Moderator . 



126 



nCLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to change Division No. 1, Section 6A of the Building By-laws as 
Hows: A permit fee, in accordance with Schedule 1 as follows: shall be paid by the applicant before the 
nnit is issued. The Building Inspector shall endorse upon the application the amount to be charged for 
; permit. The applicant shall pay this amount to the Building Inspector who will give the applicant a 
;eipt for the same, and endorse upon the application that it has been paid: 



SCHEDULE 



New Dwellings 

Additions - Alterations (all buildings) 
Garages - Private (residential) 

Commercial Buildings 
Industrial Buildings 
Signs 



Renewals (all permits) 
Swimming Pools 

Tool Sheds, Temporary Buildings 
Foundation Permits 



$10.00 minimum 

$ 3.00/$!, 000 over $10,000 

$10.00 minimum 

$ 1.00/$1,000 over $10,000 

$10.00 - I car 
$15.00 - 2 car 
$20.00 - 3 car 

$25.00 minimum 

$ 3.00/$l,000 over $25,000 

$30.00 minimum 

$ 3.00/$l,000 over $30,000 

$ 5.00 1 - 25 sq. ft. 
$10.00 25 - 50 sq. ft. 
$10.00 plus $.50 for each sq. ft. 
over 50 ft. 

$10.00 
$10.00 
$ 5.00 
$10.00 



FOR ANY BUILDING OR OTHER STRUCTURE STARTED WITHOUT A PERMIT THE PERMIT FEE WILL BE DOUBLED, 
do anything else in relation thereto. 

tion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to amend Division No. 1, Section 6A of the Building By-laws 
deleting said section and substituting the following: A permit fee, in accordance with Schedule 1 following 
ill be paid by the applicant before the permit is issued. The Building Inspector shall endorse upon the 
blication the amount to be charged for the permit. The applicant shall pay this amount to the Building 
spector who will give the applicant a receipt for the same, and endorse upon the application that it has 
5n paid. Since the schedule in the motion is the same as outlined in Article 18 above there being no 
jection further reading was dispensed with. Finance Committee approved. 

ndment by Mr. Zwicker that "Swimming Pools $10.00" be deleted at this time was lost by a voice vote. 

quorum was questioned at this time. A count was taken and 159 voters were found to be present. 

I'i vote on the main motion was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

riCLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken on Article 2 of the Special Town 
■sting held on October 25, 1965, or do anything in relation thereto. 

:ion by Mr. Carl Backman, Jr. "I move that the Town vote to rescind the action taken on Article 2 of the 
2cial Town Meeting held on October 25, 1965." Finance Committee approved. The vote on the motion was 
unimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

riCLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the action taken on Article 3 of the Special Town 
sting held on October 25, 1965, or do anything in relation thereto. 



127 



i 



ARTICLE 20. (continued) 

Motion by Mr, James Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to rescind the action taken on Article 3 of the 
Special Town Meeting held on October 25, 1965." Finance Committee approved. 

The vote on the motion was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town of Wilmington will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the 
General Court for the enactment of special legislation for and on behalf of the Town of Wilmington, in sub- 
stantially the following form to wit: 

Section 1. The Town of vJilmington is hereby authorized to appropriate and pay to Wales Co. of 
Wilmington the sum of twenty six thousand, three hundred fifty and 70/100 ($26,350.70) dollars, the sami 
being the amount collected by said town from said Wales Co., as taxes in the year nineteen hundred and 
sixty nine upon certain personal property in said town. 

Section 2. Any action taken by the Town of Wilmington at its annual town meeting held in the current 
year or at any adjourned session thereof, pursuant to the authority contained in this act, is hereby 
validated and confirmed and shall have the same effect as though this act were in full force and 
effect on the date of the posting of the warrant for such meeting. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Motion by Mr. James Banda: "I move that the Town of Wilmington vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
petition the General Court for the enactment of special legislation for and on behalf of the Town of 
Wilmington, in substantially the following form, to wit: 

Section 1. The Town of Wilmington is hereby authorized to appropriate and pay to Wales Co. of Wilmingt'; 
the sum of twenty six thousand, three hundred fifty and 70/100 ($26,350.70) dollars, the same being 
the amount collected by said town from said Wales Co. as taxes in the year nineteen hundred and sixty 
nine upon certain personal property in said town. 

Section 2. Any action taken by the Town of Wilmington at its annual town meeting held in the current 
year or at any adjourned session thereof, pursuant to the authority contained in this act, is hereby 
validated and confirmed and shall have the same effect as though this act were in full force and effect 
on the date of the posting of the warrant for such meeting. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage." 

Finance Committee approved. The vote on the motion was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to accept and receive as a gift from Magee Construction Company, j 
of Arlington, Mass. a certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington being shown as Parcel A on "Plan of Lanf' 
in Wilmington, Mass., November 1, 1968, Town of Wilmington Engineering Department," said parcel being bound) 
and described as follows: 

Northerly - by land now or formerly of Joseph W. and Madeline J. Moore and John Earle and Pauline H, 
Dick, as shown on said plan, fifty (50) feet; Easterly - by Andover Street, as shown on said plan, by 
several courses measuring respectively, one hundred eighty-seven and 11/100 (187.11) feet, three 
hundred (300) feet and one hundred fourteen and 69/100 (114.69) feet; Southerly - by land now or 
formerly of Henry B. and Robertina Landry, as shown on said plan, ten (10) feet; and Westerly - by 
Lots lA and 2A, as shown on said plan, five hundred eighty-five and 87/100 (585.87) feet. Said 
parcel A contains according to said plan 8,000 square feet, more or less. For a more particular 
description see deed dated October 3, 1967 recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds, Book 1816, Page 281, 

or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Bruce MacDonald: "I move that the Town vote to accept and receive as a gift from Magee 
Construction Company, Inc. of Arlington, Mass. a certain parcel of land situated in Wilmington being shown 
Parcel A on "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass. November 1, 1968, Town of Wilmington Engineering Department 
said parcel being bounded and described exactly as outlined in Article 22 above. Finance Committee approv 
The vote on the motion was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 



128 



.i'lCLE 23. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, or receive 

a gift, a permanent easement, for storm drain purposes, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Storm Drain 
jement" dated September 18, 1970 by the Wilmington Engineering Department, a copy of which is on file with 
B Town Clerk; and to see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money, by taxation, by 
'nsfer of available funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the acquisition of said easement, or do anything 
relation thereto. 

|i ion by Mr, Morris: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent 
jiain, or receive as a gift, a permanent easement, for storm drain purposes, as shown on a plan entitled 
"an of Storm Drain Easement" dated September 18, 1970 by the Wilmington Engineering Department, a copy of 
■i ch is on file with the Town Clerk; and that the Town vote to transfer the sum of Five Hundred Dollars 
lOO.OO) from Account #1220 - Purchase Land New Intermediate School, for the acquisition of said easement. 
' lance Committee approved. Discussion followed. Standing vote taken. Yes - 31 No - 85 Lost. 

'ICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote and appropriate a sum of money, by taxation, by transfer of avail- 
e funds, by borrowing or otherwise for the purchase of a Sweeper for the use of the Highway Department, 
I authorize the sale or turn-in of a 1966 Elgin Pelican Sweeper, or do anything in relation thereto. 

S:ion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $11,700.00 by transferring the 
;i of Six Thousand Six Hundred and Fifteen Dollars ($6,615.00 from Account #965 - Additional Employees, 
'•e Department, and the sum of Five Thousand and Eighty-five Dollars ($5,085.00) from Account #947 - 
.)raisals, for the purchase of a Sweeper for the use of the Highway Department, and authorize the sale or 
"n-in of a 1966 Elgin Pelican Sweeper." Finance Committee approved $11,700 by transfer. The vote on the 
jcion was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

."ICLE 25. (Acted upon after Article #9.) 

?ICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation or transfer from available funds, and appropri- 
; a sum of money to be expended for the engineering and title examination expenses for the purpose of 
irifying and locating a certain parcel of land owned by the Town situated West of Main Street and North of 
i Woburn City Line to be used for Town purposes, or do anything in relation thereto. 

fcion by Mr. Carl Backman, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $5,000.00 by trans- 
rrihg the sum of Three Thousand Three Hundred and Three Dollars and Fifty-six cents ($3,303.56) from Account 
D15 - Interest on Anticipation Notes and Authentication Fees, and by transferring the sum of One Thousand 
liars ($1,000.00) from Account #915 - Sewer Maintenance, and by transferring the sum of Six Hundred Ninety- 
c Dollars and Forty-four Cents ($696.44) from Account #960 - 1970 Salary Adjustments and Additional Costs, 
I be expended for the engineering and title examination expenses for the purpose of clarifying and locating 
certain parcel of land owned by the Town situated West of Main Street and North of the Woburn City Line to 
used for Town purposes." Finance Committee approved $5,000 by transfer. The vote on the motion was 
animous and so declared by the Moderator. 

riCLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map of the town of Wilmington by 
ting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business, the following described parcel of land, 
iwit: Being the land of Felice Grossi and Lucille Grossi designated as lot 1,2,3,4,5,6,7, 21,22,23 and 24 
/a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Woburn and .Wilmington, Mass., dated November 1962, H. C. Buttrick, 
gistered Land Surveyor, Reading, Mass. being further bounded and described as follows: 

NORTHERLY on Main Street beginning at the Wi Imington-Woburn line, 144.4 feet, EASTERLY by Florence Avenue 
350 feet, thence the line turns abruptly in a SOUTHERLY way to other land of petitioners located in Woburn 
'400 feet. Containing 23,000 square feet of land more or less. 

quest of Petitioners. 

:ion by Mr. Alan Altman: "I move that the town vote to amend the Zoning By-law and Map of the Town of 
ilmington by voting to rezone from Single Residence A District to General Business, the following described 
reel of land, to wit: the description of the land follows the Article 27 description exactly and further 
ading of said motion was dispensed with. Finance Committee disapproved this article. 

torney Gatti was allowed to speak for the owners of the land. The Planning Board disapproved this article - 
asidered spot zoning. Further discussion followed. Mr. Harold McKelvey asked the meeting to disapprove 
is article. Mr. Mather moved to amend the motion by passing over Article 27 and taking no action thereon, 
te on amendment carried. Main motion as amended lost by voice vote and so declared by the Moderator. 



129 



ARTICLE 28. To see how much money the Town will vote to raise by taxation, or transfer from available fun< 
by borrowing or otherwise and appropriate for the Veteran's Aid Account or do anything in relation thereto: 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to appropriate the sum of $15,099.10 for the Veterans' Ai< 
Account by transfer of available funds from the following accounts: 

Account #1131 - Preliminary Plan Elementary School - $4,000.00 

Account #150D3 - Assessors' Outlay - $1,200.00 

Account #920 - Town Report - $141.60 

Account #1000 - Maturing Debt - Schools - $125.50 

Account #1010 - Maturing Debt - Water - $1,822.00 

Account #1220 - Purchase Land New Intermediate School - $310.00 

Account #910 - Bonds and Insurance - $7,500.00 

Finance Committee approved motion. The vote on the motion was unanimous and so declared by the Moderator. 

This meeting was called to order at 1:12 P.M. there being a quorum present. 

The Warrant was read by calling the Article number - there was no objection to this. 

A motion to adjourn came at 6:35 - so voted. 

There were five hundred and sixty-five voters checked in at this meeting. 



A true copy: 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 



130 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASH ACCOUNT 
Year Ending 12/31/70 



mce as of January 1, 1970 
Id: Cash Receipts 1970 

;duct: Cash Expenditiires 1970 
mce on Hand 12/31/70 



Collections: 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 



'ior Years Levies 

Personal Property 

Real Estate Taxes 
irrent Levy 

Personal Property 

Real Estate Taxes 
jtterments Added to Taxes 

Water - Prior Levies 
- Current Levy 

Street - Prior Levies 
- Current Levy 
liter Liens Added to Taxes 

Prior Levies 

Current Levy 
ax Titles & Possessions 

Tax Titles Redeemed 
jsessments Paid in Advance 
* Water 

Slareet 



h,h9^ .70 
22U,186.13 

71 ,95U.U0 
h,638,93U.12 

1 ,70U.08 
6,hl;8.23 

31^ 

7,022.85 

2,258.00 
9,120.08 



1,975.77 
2,820.8ti 



589,527.29 
13,610,800.50 
111,200,327.79 
13, 331, 569. U5 



228,677.83 
U, 71 0,888. 52 

8,152.31 
7,335.30 

11,378.08 
28,753.76 

14,796.61 



U,999,982.U1 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 



ift Term Loans ; 

J Pay Expenditures of Town Departments 

Until Taxes are collected 
Lghway Loan Chapter 81 and 90 
y Term Loans : 
(lawsheen Ave. School 
isvelop Salem St. Well Field 
treet Bonds (Floradale Ave.) 
sst Street Construction 



2,000,000.00 
2U,900.00 

100,000.00 
320,000.00 
21,850.00 

36,100.00 



2,02li,900.00 



177,950.00 2,502,850.00 



131 



GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Aid : 

Proposed Drainage System #1 7-020-1 02-2 

Schools : 

Federal Employment Act PL 87U 

National Defense Education Act PL 88/65 

Smith-Hughes Vocational Fund PL 89/10 

Education Children Low-Income Families 

Teacher Aid Program PL 90/35 

Summer Reading Skills Program, Title I 

Head Start Program 

Dept. of Education, Teacher Shortages 
Division of Library Extensions 
Public Grants ; 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Chp. 8l & 90 
Middlesex County Chapter 90 
State Aid to Free Public Libraries 
Veterans Benefits, State 
Private Industries Grant : 

West Street Water Main Improvement 



School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Association 



29,899.27 



37,617.00 
6,li78.)47 
6,500.00 
9,898.50 

U,U5o.oo 

18,706.00 
9,88U.OO 
U57.00 
3,1;57.87 

27,58h.55 
2,000.00 
3,118.75 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Sewer Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Department ; 

Water Rates 

Water Miscellaneous 

Water Miscellaneous & Installation Balances 
Industrial Fire Protection Rates 

Refunds & Reimbursements (Appropriations) 

Refunds (Surplus Revenue) 

Recording Fees 

Sale of Town Owned Land 

Group Insurance Dividend 

Accrued Interest, Sale of Bonds 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Premium, Sale of Bonds 

Veterans Aid Recoveries 

Carter Lecture Fund (Trust Fund Interest) 

Tailings Account 

Pro Forma Tax 

Special Account/Planning Board Liens 



28l,09li.32 
3,650. U9 
2,570.30 
8.752.80 



97,UU8.8U 



32,703.30 
26,522. U5 

20,000.00 



265,191.82 
10,587.75 



12,77U.35 
680.00 



296,067.91 
19,31 U.97 
552. U2 
339.29 
270.00 
U8U.00 
1,818.U0 

U, 575. 00 
1,369.20 

3,286.28 
51i7.00 
UO7.20 
U.60 
23.OU9.99 



275, 7'i 



AGENCY AND TRUST FUNDS 



Short Term Investments-Treasury Bills 
Employee Deductions ; 

Federal Withholding Taxes 

State Withholding Taxes 

Retirement System Deductions 

Group Insurance Deductions 

U.S. Savings Bonds Deductions 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield Deductions 

Teachers Retirement 
Cemetery Perpetual Care 
Fish & Game Licenses Collected For State 
Dog Licenses Collected for County Treasurer 



2,332,632.21 

652,U8U.oU 
lUl,212.1i1 
83, 030. ill 
l;,2ii5.i)9 
787.50 
h7,88U.97 
111, 182. 89 
150.00 
1;,630.00 
3.813.25 



132 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



ome and Sales Tax: 



ools 

aation Basis Distribution 

mbursement - Loss of Taxes 

or Vehicle Excise Collections: 



lor Levies 
rrent Levy- 
Animal Excise Collections 
Rates 

ance Collections 
eiiSes, Liquor 
erests and Costs: 



hort Term Investments 
Collections 
er Demands 
Titles Redeemed 
ipal Receipts ; 



electmen 
ollector 
own Clerk 
lanning Board 
olice Department 
uilding Inspector: 
Building Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Gas Installation Permits 
ealer of Weights & Measures 
own Engineer 

ighway Dept. Snow Plowing Reimb. 
emetery Department 
ealth & Sanitation: 

Public Health Nurse 

Plumbing Permits 

Licenses and Permits 

Rabies Clinic 
fare Reimbursements 
erans Recovery 
ools: 

ept. of Educ. /Occupation 

ansportation and Tuition 
vening School Fees 
Vocational Educ. Receipts 
Driver Education Fees 
itiscellaneous Receipts 
chool Construction Reimb. 
pecial Education 
'Regional School Reimb. 
reation Department 
aurance Claims & Reimb. 
England Tel. & Tel. Comm. 
District Court Fines 
urth District CoTirt Fines 
3cellaneous Receipts 
ition Fees Reimb. 
License Reimb. 
rary Fines 
of Dogs 
itry Releases 
of Natural Resources 

n Project, Police Tele. Processing 
Improv. Loan Chap. 768 
of Community Affairs 



U, 2^0. 00 
602.00 



^20.00 
972.00 
1,867.50 
1,^00.70 



U, 006. 00 
66,361 .00 
623.80 
2,279.00 
2,1^0.00 
231 .81 
239,51 2. Ii7 
97,718.12 
102,850.00 



787,1 6U.05 
50.9l;6.70 



76,738.1^3 
350.718.13 



28,276.13 
20,382.1 li 
3,363.116 
U,26l .li9 

551i.OO 
876.50 

U,55l .11 
60.00 

1,768.1i2 



7,32U.95 
U87.OO 
92. U3 
2,676.02 
5,508.00 



U, 860. 20 
753.86 
660. Ii2 



515,732.20 
70.00 



838,110.75 

lili5.77 



U27,U56.56 
162.38 
25,01 2. OU 
3,379.00 
U, 000. 00 



56,283.22 



5U5,975.11 
9,610.62 
98. U2 
liO.OO 
9,291 .00 
533.86 
Ii95.00 
2,511 .27 
1,6U9.6U 
210.00 
182.00 
5,500.00 
890.00 
695.00 
m,878.65 
610.59 



'■1 
It' 
?5 



1 ,9U8,020.88 
13,610,800.50 



133 




DISBURSEMENTS FROM GEMERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE YEAR ENDING 1 2/31 /70 



Refunds: 
Real Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 
Motor Vehicle Registry Releases 
Land Court Charges 
Tax Title Recording Fees 
Street Assessments 
Water Department: 
Rates 

Water Misc. 
Water Liens 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Comm. & Industrial Fire Prot. Rates 

Sewer Installations 
Estimated Receipts 
Assessments - State & Coimtjr 
County Tax 
County Hospital 
County Retirement 
State Recreation Areas 
Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
M.D.C. Sewer 
M.D.C. Sewer Connectors 
M.B.T.A. 

Metropolitan Area Planning Counsel 
Water Department 

Maintenance & Operation 
Water Betterments - Royal Street 
Water Betterments - Hudson Street 
Well Fields: 

Salem Street 

Main Street 

Butters Row 

Develop Three Well Sites 
Chestnut Street Well field 
Street Betterments 

Ferguson Road 

Elwood Road 

Floradale Avenue 

West Street Construction 
Legal Settlements 
Ten^jorary Loans: 

Anticipation of Taxes 

Anticipation of Reimb. (Highway) 
En^jloyee Deductions: 

Federal Withholding Tax 

State Withholding Tax 

Retirement Deductions 

Group Insurance 

U.S. Savings Bonds 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 
Agency Accounts: 

Dog Licenses Due the County 

Fish and Game Licenses Due the State 
U.S. Treasiiry Bills (Investments) 
Carter Lecture Fund 
Premium Sale of Bonds 



21,293.18 
9,932.93 
180.00 
18.88 
156.11; 
36.31 



8,308.73 
7.00 

UO.22 
1 ,609.69 
1 ,100.00 

95.65 



119,292.36 
11,652.0U 
95.550.00 
21 ,020.78 

1.550.85 
53,701.16 

7,660. Ili 
87,371.73 

I.I3U.03 



2U9,8Ul4.67 
726.27 
1 ,130.00 
8,368.69 
1,255.38 



11,161 .29 
517.58 



226,U9U.U0 
22,571.63 

lU9.867.O6 

168,711 .5U 
1,890.00 
31 .2U 



261,325.01 

3,161 .05 
1,li27.50 
U26.2U 
3.030.00 



2,000,000.00 
2U,625.00 

652,U8U.0U 
1U1,212.U1 
83,030.U1 
U,198.I;1 
787.50 
h7.870.26 

3,882.00 
li.631 .00 



929,583. 



13U 



=5ral Grants & Aids 
;hools 

Title V Grants PL 89/1 
Federal Employment Act PL 87h 
Teacher Aid Program PL 90/3^ 
Head Start Program 
Saturday Reading Program 
Summer Reading Program 
dool Lunch Program 
1 1 School Athletic Association 
jjstery Trust Funds 

of Cemetery Lots (Refund) 
sib Intermediate School 
im Street School Addition 
jsheen Avenue School 
nington Memorial Library 
jjstruct Nichols Street Bridge 
jjstruct Sewer Mains 
2ia Road Subdivision Compl. 
b Street Improvement Fund 

Total Expenditures from General Accounts 



UjU^O.OO 
75,707.72 
6U2.77 
10,81 3. OU 

7,099.UJ4 
19,312.71 



118,025.68 
26U,U37.02 
7,235.22 
150,00 
110.00 

Uoo.oo 

32,li08.22 
U8l,li07.9U 
22,33U.62 

2,822.UO 
11,000.00 

2,OU0.7U 
19.U07.l3 

6,701,381.98 



COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1970 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL RECEIPTS OF THE YEAR 1970 



Used by the 
Assessors on 
the 1970 Rate 



Actual 
1970 
Receipts 



Receipts 
more than 
Estimated 



Receipts 
less than 
Estimated 



])r Vehicle & Trailer Excise 

jnses 

|;3 

;ial Assessments 

jral Government 

section of Persons & Property 

iway 

iteries (Other than Trust Funds 

id Sale of Cemetery Lots) 

Lth and Sanitation 

'ary (Local Receipts) 

;rests & Costs 

a Animal Excise 

Hance Collections 

It Evening Tuition 

3r Revenue 

cellaneous Receipts 

arance Reimbursements 

I License Reimbursements 

fare Recoveries 

srans Recoveries 

tonal School Reimbursements 

ts 

te Estimated Receipts 



378,861 .97 
U, 000. 00 
U,322.00 
9,263.09 
6,056.98 
12,12U.39 
U,981 .OU 
6,152.67 

U,552.UU 
1 ,210.51; 

91 ,901 .03 
213.69 
3,003.00 
2,235.80 

18,517.98 
8,501 .86 



95U, 770.06 



1417,523.63 
U, 000. 00 
9,331.00 
10,122. liO 
6,029.61 
9,580.37 
2,768.U5 
5,508.00 

U, 860.20 
1,6U9.6U 
56,281i.70 
162.38 
3,379.00 
3,268.80 
25,596.39 
1 ,326.09 
9,610.62 
2,009.21 
753.86 
660. Ii2 
102,850.00 
890.00 
1,296,639.80 



38,661 .66 

5,009.00 
859.31 



307.76 
U39.10 



376.00 
1,033.00 
7,078.U1 

9,610.62 
2,009.21 
753.86 
660. U2 
102,850.00 
890.00 
3li1,869.7U 



27.37 

2,5l4li.02 
2,212.59 

61;li.67 



35,616.33 
51 .31 



7,175.77 



1,510,668.5U 



1,97li,80U.57 



512,U08.09 



U8,272.06 



135 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31 , 1 970 



Cash 

Short Term Investments 

(Treasury Bills) 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected : 

Prior Levies 

Personal Property 

Current Levies 

Personal Property 
Real Estate Taxes 
Personal Property Taxes 
in Litigation 
Levy 
Levy 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes ; 
Prior Levies 



Current Levy 
Tax Titles & Possessions ; 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 
Assessments added to Taxes ; 

Street Assessments 

Committed Street Interest 

Water Assessments 

Committed Water Interest 

Accounts Receivable : 
Water Department 
Water Rates 
Water Miscellaneous 
Commercial & Industrial Fire 

Protection Rates 
Water Miscellaneous and 
Installation Balances 
Water Liens 
Sewer Rates 
Highway Department 
State Aid to Highways 
Coiinty Aid to Highways 
Ambulance Services 
Veterans Services 
Unprovided for AccoTints ; 
Overlay Deficits 
Levy 

Assessment Underestimates 
County Tax Assessment 
State Recreation Assessment 
Metro. Area Planning Council 

Legal Settlements 
Loans Authorized 

TOTAL ASSETS 



ASSETS 



(1968) 171.50 

(1969) 200.90 372. UO 

2,908.50 
118,06U.U9 120.972.99 



865, 758. 3U 

200,000.00 
3l;0.00 



(1969) 
(1970) 

(1966) 
(1967) 
(1968) 
(1969) 



(1970) 
(1970) 
(1970) 
(1967) 
(1970) 



13.21 

239.05 
2,76U.96 
U,U07.69 



7,U2li.91 
75,379.65 



258.65 
II46.52 
1,317.23 
.96 
536.32 



5U,Uli5.03 

77.368.20 131,813 



109,582.57 
36.U67.I8 



Ii05.l7 
1.85U.51 



2, 



(1970) 



26,U82.8l 
611 .30 

6,823.20 

67.50 
1,715.76 



85,928.21 
22,06U.11 



35,700.57 
85U.52 
97.00 

107,992.32 
15,739.00 
9,333.96 



169,71 



(1968) 
(1970) 

(1970) 
( 1 970) 
(1970) 
(1970) 



10.50 
10,511.97 

15,8149.87 
l,558.3lt 
379.57 



10,522. U7 



17,787.78 
ItiO.OO 



136 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1970 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



porary Loans, Anticipation of 

eimburseraent (Highway) 

loyee Payroll Deductions ! 

roup Insurance Deductions 

lue Cross/Blue Shield-Town Employees 

lue Cross/Blue Shield-Teachers 

er Guaranteed Deposits 

ncy AccoTjnts: 



og Licenses due County 
lings. Unclaimed Checks 
igned Tax Titles 
rued Interest, Sale of Bonds 
e of Town Owned Land 
up Insurance Dividends 
olving Funds ; 



chool Lunch Program 
igh School Athletic Assoc. 
.eral Grants: 



PL 87U 
PL 85/86U 



'ederal Employment Act 
ational Defense Education 
ureau of Library Extension, Title II 
eading Skills Program, Title V 
aturday Reading Program 
lummer Reading Skills 
lead Start Program 
.te Aid to Free Public Libraries 
e of Cemetery Lots 
iropriation Balances; 



electmen. Expenses 
'own Treasurer, Tax Titles 
'lanning Board 

Professional Services 

Planning Consultant 
'olice Dept. Expenses 
'ire Dept. Expenses 
iivil Defense 

uilding Inspector, Expenses 



chapter 90 Construction 



1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 

lemetery Dept. Expenses 
"■eterans Services, Aid 
ichool Maintenance, Repairs-No. Interm. 
School 

;lchool Grounds Maintenance-Outlay 
ilaintenance Toim Bldgs . -Outlay 
'tecreation Account, Expenses 
Conservation Commission 
:|ermanent Building Committee : 

Contractual Services 

Plans, Addition to Police Station 
ippraisals 

:lollective Bargaining Negotiations 
)*urchase Land, Conservation Comm. - Thrush 
mdover Street, Land Takings 
3iand for Recreation, Grove Avenue 
'Veterans Retirement 



U, 000. 00 
2,291.02 



1U,578.36 
3U,200.00 
9,000.00 
9,U50.00 
9,U50.00 



1U,373.00 
1 ,000.00 



372.30 

2,625.U9 
U2.2i; 



3.6U 
6,050.19 

2,221 .56 
hh,7h9.79 
3,U57.87 
6,500.00 
1,1U2.1U 
20li.62 
375. U6 



500.00 
2,302.1.1 



6,29U.02 
872.16 
3,500.00 
2,li07.60 
93.50 



76,678.36 
10,750.00 
7,820.00 

2,800.00 
200.00 
11, 9U5. 10 

U5.1U 
li08.28 



15,373.00 
18,207.71 
2,037.50 
1 ,200.00 
2,h39.11i 
a, 1 50.00 
560. 6U 



2h,900.00 



3, Oho. 03 

1U0.53 

U5.25 
1,258.79 
Uli.62 
1,818.52 
820.00 
U8U.77 



6,053.83 



58,651 ,kh 
3,118.75 

h,li65.00 



137 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



By-Law Study Committee 
Drug Dependency Committee 

Engineering & Title Search, Town Owned Land 

Nichols Street, Land Damage 

Re-locate Shawsheen Avenue Bridge 

Aldrich Road Well Site 

Tovm Beach Improvements 

Repair Roof, No. Interm. School 

Glen Road Tennis Coirrts 

Shai^sheen Avenue Tennis Courts 

Purchase Sweeper, Highway Dept. 

Addition to Highway Bldg. & Heating System 
Non-Revenue AccoTmts t 

Purchase Land, School Sites 

Woburn Street School Construction 

Wobum Street School Addition 

Shawsheen Avenue School Construction 

West Intermediate School Construction 

Wilmington Memorial Library 

Construct Nichols Street Bridge 

Water Betterments 
Hudson Street 
Lawrence Street 
Royal Street 

Salem Street Well Field 

Chestnut Street Well Field 

Main Street Well Field 

Develop Three Well Fields 

Street Betterments 
Ferguson Road 
J ere Road 
Elwood Road 
Floradale Avenue 

West Street Construction 
Completion of Private Enterprise Projects ; 

Complete Dell Drive 

West Street Improvement Fund 

Esquire Estates Completion 

Marcia Road Subdivision Completion 
Loans Authorized and Unissued 
Overestimates 1970 Assessments ; 

County Hospital Assessment 

M.D.C. Sewer Assessment 

Mass. Bay Trans. Authority 

Ipswich River Watershed 
Overlays Reserved for Abatements ; 

Levy of 19^5 
1966 
1969 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected ; 
Motor Vehicle Excise Revenue 
Special Assessments Revenue 
Tax Title Revenue 
Departmental Revenue 
Water Revenue 
Sewer Revenue 

State & County Aid to Highways Revenue 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 
Surplus Revenue : 
General 

Water Available Surplus 
TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



1,86U.76 
877.00 
889.86 



5,070.19 
23.23 
791 .95 
22,573.76 



653.15 
11,525.00 
li,896.38 
1,775.00 
3,000.00 
50.00 
1,138.65 
2,769.06 
12,950.00 
6,515.27 
11 ,700.00 
10,U79.12 

13,200.00 
U,923.8U 

11,812.21 

58,201 .U7 
9,7U7.22 

UU,862.6l 
1 ,680.00 



3,631 .62 
181,861 .58 
ii,60U.06 
U,265.23 
U.81 



28,U59.13 
3lt,970.00 

9,728.71 
592.57 
2,721 .28 
8,559.26 



.02 

2,959.70 
553.27 
1,509.1i7 

10,321.. 39 
55,2U7.)46 
l;.h93.27 

82,80U.56 
2,259.68 
1ii6,OU9.75 
25,169.96 
35,700.57 
85ii.52 
U5, 250.00 
3lt0.00 

Ul 2,266.77 
153,051 .86 



238,036. V 



U02,'223.7' 



21,601 .6? 
1 ,087,U00.0M 



5,022.1v 
70,065.1: 



338,li29.0;5 



565,31 8. 6j 



138 



$ 2,835,938.5; 



ANALYSIS OF THE 


MATURING DEBT 








Balances 


Added 


P aid-Off 






1 /I /70 


1970 


1970 


1 2/31 /7O 














1 n nno nn 




10,000.00 


0.00 












t )i)i in 000 00 


ion 000 on 




25,000.00 


75,000.00 


Its V \J\JllO KIX *JS.\JLI UWllLiO \ 1 ^V-' f / 






t «5oo 10 <ki 7 /^on OO 


t Ann nn 




5,600.00 


0.00 


!6u oons uruCTrion uonus ^ ly^yj 










Y lili cjo/* 10 *fel(0 7on no 

ill UU^ Dec* 1 L/^ •4)mj J J)UU» 


9 A Rnn nn 




13,500.00 


13,300.00 


»Q+ Pr\na + wi<^ + n r»n RnnH^ ( 1 QVO^ 
!6u OOllHurUC UXUXl DUIXU.O \ 1 y f^J 










*T <^af* 1 o flc^n on 

ill 06C« 4>^I^OpU«UU 




21,850.00 




21,850.00 


Qjjguon nemopxaj. iiiurary 


liAn nnn nn 








1" )■)■ 10 (feliftt^ OOO OO 




25,000.00 


U35,000.00 


lOJ-S oTireeu Drioge iiosii \yoyj 










01 Ann nn 




8,000.00 


23,600.00 


t Streetf Cons'truction Bonds 








Y t.l. in <t'3A 1 nr^ r\r\ 
iL UUj Dec» 1 vjj (pJOjIUU.UU 




36,100.00 








nnn nn 


57,950.00 


87,100.00 


60U, 850.00 


. JJJri iJIl*0 X li JLriX 1 Z 










1 Q/»V^/^/^^ T nan A<^+ "^Ol /li7 












1 n nnn nn 
1 u,uuu.uu 




10,000.00 


0.00 


G£ Ai.Tier ur»/Dr« mgn ocnooj. 










"ind. nnn nn 

J 1^ f UUU . UU 




70,000.00 


305,000.00 ; 


<sc Aix/er ur«/or» nxgn ocnoox 










1 An nnn nn 
1 ou , uuu.uu 




20,000.00 


160,000.00 


. lUJelU OCxlOOX iiC Ub Ui4.p/ i4U 








cfn ono on 


1 7c^ nnn nn 

1 f p , UUU . UU 




25,000.00 


150,000.00 


wWcXX Q OX^OO 1/ t^Jv/XXUUX^ iiCr Uo 






ii^/Jifl <fc)iOn OOO OO 


onn nnn nn 

tUU , UUU . UU 




20,000.00 


180,000.00 


XXL uC^X^iilCUXcl ljOIXUUXj iiU Uo 










\K/\tfK <bi oi^n noo oo 


Ant^ nnn nn 

OUp , UUU . UU 




55,000.00 


550,000.00 


luus ocnoox FrojecT/ Lioaxis 












nnn nn 




5,000.00 


28,000.00 


IXXX oTii766X> DCnOOX^ iiCX>S 










*fecC07 OOO OO 


111 ? nnn nn 




30,000.00 


382,000.00 


f !Di't6i*in6(ix3,'b6 SohooX 








.+« AliC^/J.A <tl lil.Cf OOO OO 


1 1 lic! nnn nn 

1 , 1 tip , UUU . UU 




75,000.00 


1 ,070,000.00 


im oureeo ocnoox AQuXuiLon 










ius O4p/£|0^ ipoou J (Juu » uu 


c^on nnn nn 
pyu, UUU.UU 




35,000.00 


555,000.00 


irn oLreeii ocnoox Aaaition viyoo; 












1 A c^nn nn 
1 , pUU . UU 




8,500.00 


8,000.00 


irsheen Avenue SchooX^ Acts 










'.r^/l.Q (t-i 'yoA nn 
D/UO> •pi yO(Uf (ti<J,iJO 


1 [^t^tf nnn nn 
1 ,bpp,Ouu.OU 




115,000.00 


i,UUo,ooo.oo 


irsheen Avenue School ( 2nd. issue) 










8tS 0U5/U0, $100,000.00 


n nn 
u.uu 


100,000.00 


0.00 


100,000.00 


'!p Meters— Iiiiprove . Existing System 










XLenjienus unp* U4joec»o, >(>i upjuuu.uu 


1 1. nnn nn 
1 i;,uuU.UU 




7,000.00 


7,000.00 


r Standpipe Bonds, Chp. Ul;, Sec 




ic. 8, $152,000.00 


Uo,ooo.oo 




10,000.00 


30,000.00 


r Main Bonds (19^8) 








iiD. liii. Spp. 8. ^'lO.OOO.OO 


6 000.00 




U, 000.00 


2,000.00 


i':r Bonds, New Well Field 








lip. hh. Sec. 8, $90,000.00 


10,000.00 




10,000.00 


0,00 


'ir Main Bonds (1962) 






up. UU, Sec. 8, $86,000.00 


Uo,ooo.oo 




5,000.00 


35,000.00 


'ir Main Bonds New Well Field 








lip. UU, Sec. 8, $U63,529.00 


330,000.00 




30,000.00 


300,000.00 


iim Street Well Field 










iip. UU, Sec. 8, $56,750.00 


56,750.00 




11 ,350.00 


U5,Uoo.oo 


wji Street Well Field & Main 










up. UU, Sec. 8, $ 320,000.00 




320,000.00" 




320,000.00 


5,793,250.00 


U20,000.00 


5U5,850.00 


5,667, UOO. 00 


IINED TOTALS 


6,U27,250.00 


U77,950.00 


632,950.00 


6,272,250.00 






139 







REPORT OF EXPENDITURES DUIiING 1970 FROM APPROPRIATIONS 



SELECT ION 
Salaries 
Printing Adv. ' 
Legal Fees 
Misc. Ser'rices 



Binding 



Tow. Meeting Expenses 
Supplies Office 



ELECTIONS 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 



FINAI^rCE COMMITTEE 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Supplies Office 



TCT/fll MANAGER 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNT 

Printing Adv. 4 Binding 
Misc. Services 
Transportation 
Supplies Office 



1,061 .2$ 
350. <0 
0.00 

1 ,0l8.11i 

3,h22.26 
338.21 

6,190.36 



U,87U.75 
552.70 
11i3.96 
IU.86 

5,586.^7 



3,215.01 
59U.75 
1,6U3.87 
78.98 
5,562.61 



100.00 
280.07 

1,850.35 
2.00 

2,232.U2 



23,UI;li.91 
21 .60 
396.03 
287.06 

2U,1U9.60 



20.00 
61 .00 
0.00 
170.75 
251.75 



TOWN COLLECTOR 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Dues Subs. 4 Misc. Serv. 
Supplies Office 



TOWN CLERK 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. 4 Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



ASSESSORS 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 



TOM COUNSEL 

Personal Services 
Misc. Contr. Services 



TOWN HALL 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Sei^ces 
Postage 

Supplies Office 
Outlay 



PLANNING BOARD 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 

Professional Services 
Planning Consultant 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 



TOW TREASURER 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Repairs & Maint. 
Supplies Office 
Tax Title Foreclosures 



18,U70.68 
U3.00 
1;02.96 
590.30 

19,506.96 



16,236.19 
156.00 
U7.50 
1,578.19 
lU,i^36.8U 
32,U5U.72 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Salary Chief 
Salary Lieutenant 
Salaries Sergeants 
Salaries Patrolmen 
Salaries Traffic Supervisors 
Salary Clerk 
Salaries Vacation 
Salaries Sick Leave 
Salaries Extra Help 
Salaries Paid Holidays 
Salau'ies Police Dog Officers 
Repairs & Maintenance 
Misc. Contr. Services 



lUO 




:CE DEPARTMENT (continued) 
Idnt. of Dogs 
nothing & Rubber Goods 
jisoline & Oil 
■ipplies Office 
nail Tools & Equipment 
itlay 
misers 
misers 



[L DEFENSE 
U.aries 

Isc. Contr. Services 

fcilities 

ransportation 

applies Office 

mall Tools & Equipment 



STABLE 



alary 



896. 2U 
8,069.50 
6,967.88 
1,092.51 
1,812.72 
1,678.08 
7,979.00 
7.325.15 
386,975.05 



S EALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Salary 

Small Tools & Equipment 



TOWN ENGINEER 
Salary Engineer 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Repairs 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Gasoline & Oil 



0.00 
li1.63 

101 .15 

0.00 
30.95 

351. 5U 
525.27 



100.00 



CHAPTER 90 MAINTENANCE 
Expenses 

CHAPTER 81 



Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Construction 



CHAPTER 768 



Shaw. Ave. Highway Project 
Relocate Maint. & Repair Bridges 



1 ,000.00 
18.75 
1,018.75 



12,196.57 
1U,735.30 
171 .63 
380. U8 
197. U8 



5 DEPARTMENT 




Supplies Office 


618.61 


ilary Chief 




Small Tools & Equipment 


561 .59 


ilaries Lieutenants 


36,732.83 


Outlay 


713.07 


ilaries Privates 


196,666.57 




29,57U.73 


ilaries Call Fire & Ambulance 


12,151.69 
13,267.52 




ilaries Vacations 


HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 




ilaries Sick Leave 


5,156.28 


Salary Superintendent 


12,039.18 
109,582.66 


ilaries Paid Holidays 


8,560.00 


Salaries Other 


jpairs & Maintenance 


2,U68.33 


Misc. Contr. Services 


6,079.20 


5palrs Radios 


U3O.52 


Chemicals 


1 ,826.73 


Lsc. Contractual Services 


U50.16 


Clothing & Rubber Goods 


378.60 


Lo thing St. Rubber Goods 


2,989.18 


Supplies Construction 


35,125.11 


asoline & Oil 


1,U03.87 


Supplies Office 


61 .77 


ipplies Office 


127.63 


Small Tools & Equipment 


9,833. 9U 


Tiall Tools & Equipment 


5,022.36 


Outlay 


6,5U3.78 


titlay & Fire Alarm Maint. 


10,8Uli.83 


Sidewalks 


21|,250.56 


orchase 1000 GM Pumper 


35,000.00 


Drainage 


23,937.7U 


ire Chief's Car 


2,696.50 




229,659.27 









6,li90.33 



11,200.00 
7,000.00 
22,698.82 
U0,«98.82 



100.00 



1^,959.55 
1U,87U.5U 
19,83U.09 



OFFICER 
alary 

isc. Contr. Services 



ILDING INSPECTOR 
alaries 

rinting Adv. & Binding 
oies Subs, 
isc. Sei*vices 
lapplies Office 
utlay 



IRD OF APPEALS 
alaries 

rinting Adv. & Binding 
isc. Services 
lupplies Office 



2,U89.20 
1,296.60 
3,785.80 



1U,800.85 
67.00 
82.95 
U.50 
319.69 
280.00 
15,55U.99 



U82.50 
21 .00 
0.00 
98.75 

602.25 



ROAD MACHINERY 

Repairs & Maintenance 
Gasoline & Oil 
3ig Ton Truck 
3/k Ton Truck 
2ig Ton Truck 



SNOVr & ICE CONTROL 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maint. 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Gasoline & Oil 
Salt & Sand 

Small Tools & Equipment 



PUBLIC STREET LIGHTS 
Expenses 



13,73U.26 
10,^57.65 
7,617.00 
2,99ii.OO 
6,365.00 
ll,1 67.91 



37,063.61 
8,088.76 

19,380.8U 
3,203.58 

31,312.6U 
3,931 .81 



11,710.53 



llil 



TREE DEPARn^T 

Salaries 12,8U8.38 

Repairs & Maint. 65^7. U5 

Misc. Contr. Services 662. 8U 

Chemicals 3,72^.83 

Gasoline & Oil 1,299.79 

Small Tools & Equipment 3^0.70 

Trees 1,^00.00 

Outlay 3/h Ton Truck 3,6^6.6^ 

Winch for Tree Truck 9^0.00 

25,651 .6U 

DUTCH ELM CONTROL 

Salaries 12,277.00 

Repairs & Maint. 12U.89 

Chemicals 1,8U3.70 

Small Tools & Equipment 290.06 

GYPSY M3TH CONTROL 

Salaries 9,000.00 

Repairs & Maintenance 63.23 

Chemicals 1,852.08 

Gasoline & Oil 302.38 

Small Tools & Equipment 99.93 

1i,3l7.62 

PARK DEPARTMENT 

Salaries 2,858.25 

Maint. & Supplies 127.00 

Supplies for Care of Grotinds U, 738.82 

7,72U.07 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Salaries U5,289.62 

Repairs & Maint. 3,l57.3U 

Misc. Contr. Services 522.30 

Liners 295.96 

Gasoline & Oil 567. U7 

Supplies Care of Grounds 869.13 

Supplies Construction U,6l3.22 

Supplies Office 92.68 

Small Tools & Equipment 23.32 

Outlay Equipment 1,120.00 

25g Ton Dump Truck - 6,032.00 

62, 503. Oil 

WATER DEPARTMENT 

Salaries 105,329.36 

Repairs & Maint. 8,657.37 

Misc. Contr. Services 6,707.13 

Public Utilities 23,091 .h2 

Transportation 639 . 75 

Gasoline & Oil 5,701.32 

Meters & Meter Parts 5,0li1 .03 

Pipes & Fittings 5,ii5l .35 

Supplies Construction U13.26 

Supplies Office 3,775.8U 

Small Tools & Equipment 3,379.71 

Outlay 52U.OO 



16a, 711. 5U 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Salaries 3U,588.( 

Printing Adv. & Binding k2,' 

Clinic Expenses 1,136.i 

Misc. Contr. Services 57U.I 

Supplies Office UU^.! 

Outlay 567.1 

Hospitalization & Medical 1,282.: 

Garbage Collection 2U,lU6.i 

Town Dump 2U,000.i : 

86,785. 

VETERANS SERVICES 

Salaries 6,90U. 

Misc. Contr. Services 51.' 

Supplies Office ^5. 

Supplies Outlay 19U. 

Veterans Aid 77,719. ' 

"5117%:: 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

Salaries, Sec. & Clk. (Clk. Sch. Comm.) 800. 

Salaries, Prof. (Central Office) U9,890. 

Salaries, Sec. 8r Cler. (Central Off.) 16,90^. 

' Salaries, Prof. (Subj. Spec.) 208,37^. 

Salaries, Prof. (Elem. Prin.) 77,U39.' 

Salaries, Prof. (Jr. High Prin.) 26,091., 

Salaries, Prof. (Sr. High Prin.) 27,736. 

Salaries, Cler. & Sec. (Elem.) 23,388., 

Salaries, Cler. & Sec. (Jr. High) 8,801,, 

Salaries, Cler. & Sec. (Sr. High) 11,Ii93.. 

Salaries, Prof. (Substitutes) Ul,9l5.. 

Salaries, Prof. (Elem. Teachers) U73,h78. 

Salaries, Prof. (Jr. High Teachers) 600,620.^ 

Salaries, Prof. (Sr. High Teachers) 750,997. 

Salaries, Prof. (Elem. Guidance) 10,725.- 

Salaries, Prof. (Jr. High Guidance) 33,798.: 

Salaries, Prof. (Sr. High Guidance) 58,812.. 

Salaries, Prof. (Sp. Class Teachers) 92, 265. . 

Salaries, Prof. (Supervision) 772.. 

Salaries, Prof, (instruction) 17,536.. 

Salaries, Prof. (Instruction) ^,20U. 

Salaries, Prof. (Sch. Nurse & ?hys.) 23,698.. 

Salaries, Non-Prof. (Attend.& Census) U,780., 
Salaries, Prof. (Cafeteria Supejrvisor) 5,530.. 

Contracted Services 25,233.. 

Other Exp. (Assoc. & Publications) 3,578.. 

Contracted Services 1 ,01 1 ., 

Supplies & Mat. (Central Off.) 1,295.^ 

Other Exp. (In Town Travel) 919.. 

Supplies & Mat. (Music & Art) 2,826., 

Other Exp. (Travel & Prof. Lit.) 2,li9U.; 

Contracted Serv. (Teachers Aides) 21, 573. - 

Out of State Travel 3,266.. 

Contr. Services (Rinehart) 3,600., 

Contr. Service (Test Scoring) 1,753.i 

Supplies & Mat. (Elem. Stat. & Supp.) 17,670.. 



Supplies & Mat. ( Jr.High Stat.&Supp.) 11,793., 

Supplies & Mat. (Sr. High Stat.&Supp.) 21,138.i 

Supplies & Mat. (Elem. Texts&Inst.Aid) 20,U32.- 

Supplies Sc Mat. (Jr.High Text&Ins . Aid) 15,027. 



1U2 



)0L DEPARTMENT (continued) 

ipplies & Mat. (Sr.High Text&Ins.Aid) 1^,583.68 

: ipplies & Mat. (Elem. Library Texts) k,9^2.7k 

ipplies & Mat. (Jr. High Lib. Texts) 1,738.19 

ipplies & Mat. (Sr. High Lib. Texts) 2,^72.73 

mtr. Services (A.V. Aids) U,2U3.?1 

ipplies & Mat. (A.V. Aids) 2,^56.26 

ipplies & Mat. (Sp. Class Supplies) 89I .23 

mtr. Ser. (Spec. Educ. Tuition) 7,711.^0 

ipplies & Mat. (Spec. Class Texts & 1,031.96 
' Inst. Aids) 

mtracted Services ^,^17.19 

.D.E.A. 9,296. 3ii 

applies & Mat. (Nurses) 286.75 

, Dntr. Services (Pupil Transp.) 99,l82.1i7 

ifeteria Subsidy 3,?58.6U 

ontr. Services (Athletic Transp.) 2,3^6.00 

ipplies & Mat. (Phys. Educ.) 10,8U5.78 

'jntr. Services (Transp. Educ. Trips) U, 695.^0 

Dntr. Services (Adj. Counselor ) 1,^30.00 

ontr. Services 13,6^7.35 

Lementary Utilities 2U,591 .08 

r. High Utilities 13,782.67 

r. High Utilities 13,^77.80 

ontr. Ser. (Elem. Maint. & Repairs) 1,985.U0 

ontr. Ser. (Jr.High Maint. & Repairs) 1,26U.35 

ontr. Ser. (Sr.High Maint. & Repairs) 5,U96.53 

ontr. Ser. (Adm.Bldg. Maint. & Repairs) 299.67 

applies & Mat. (Capital Outlay) 9.6l8.06 

2,987,U96.3U 

(^TIONAL TRAINING 

uition 7,712.77 

I'ansportation 697.2^ 

1 8,U10.02 



[ OOL MAINTENANCE 
alaries 

epairs & Maint. 

isc. Contr. Services 

asoline & Oil 

upplies Plant 

mall Tools & Equipment 

Aiel Heating 

I'ur. Hot Water Heating System - 
Boutwell School 
utlay 

lepairs to No. Inter. School 1970 
•"ruck 



i[00L GROUNDS MAINTENANCE 
ilepaiirs & Maint. 
ilasoline & Oil 
upplies Care of Grounds 
fimall Tools & Equipment 
i>utlay 



■' :ntmance of Tom buildings 

lepairs & Maint. 
'ublic Utilities 
'lenovation of Old Library 
i)utlay 



18,886.35 
I8,063.7ii 
801 .h$ 
18,360.31 
0.00 
li3,U00.00 
1,523.06 

11,351.69 
3,195.U5 
6,912.00 
U36,969.U6 



1,022.28 
32U.I2 

5,3142. UU 

0.00 
U.6I9.8O 
11,308.614 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Salaries 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Library 
Supplies Office 



recreation 

Salaries 

Misc. Services 

Playground & Beach Supplies 

Outlay 



unclassified 



U2,1U1 .99 
690.01 
2U,700.82 
3.U29.30 
70,962.12 



28,ii58.05 
6,328.92 
1,79U.15 
720.1t8 

37,301 .60 



5,853.72 
21,019.15 
6,595.88 
1 .976.20 
3S,hhh.95 



Reserve Fund 


50,000.00 


Perm. Bldg. Comm. Salaries 


1 ,087.50 


Perm. Bldg. Comm. Contr. Services 


U,5UU.oo 


Bonds & Insurance 


66,U30.22 


Sewer Maintenance 


1 ,000.00 


Town Report 


2,000.00 


Local Transportation 




Town Manager 


600.00 


Assessors 


771 .61 


Police 


916.50 


Dog Officer 


882. )40 


Building Inspector 


853.20 


Town Engineer 


75. ho 


Cemetery 


620.60 


Board of Health 


2,078.10 


Veterans ' Services 


58U.80 


Selectmen 


500.00 


Treasurer & Collector 


Ul .80 


Planning Board 


101 .96 


Recreation 


27li.60 


Accountant 


25.00 


Town Clerk 


U.56 


Training & Conf . In State 




Treasurer & Collector 


55.00 


Police 


590.25 


Maintenance 


3h9.25 


Town Manager 


136.00 


Assessors 


U06.50 


Health 


273.55 


Building Inspector 


299.50 


Planning Board 


190.00 


Fire 


21;. 00 


Selectmen 


196.50 


Veterans' Services 


157. ho 


Town Engineer 


172.00 


Library 


37.09 


Town Clerk 


120.98 


Training & Conf. Out of State 




Library 


6U.28 


Building Inspector 


UUo.oo 


Assessors 


650.00 


Maintenance 


U69.80 


Recreation 


250.00 


Police 


125.00 


Lease of Quarters 


2,250.00 


Blue Cross & Insurance 


62,960.63 


Conservation Committee 


2,958.20 


Memorial Day &, Veterans Day 


1,839.65 


Unpaid Bills 


11,U73.00 


Appraisals 


6,2U1 .50 



1U3 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Andover Street 60.86 

Kenwood Avenue 2l|.86 

Redwood Avenue 33.66 

Coll. Barg. Nego. 962.^0 

Reg. Voc. Sch. Dist. Comm. UO,U39.05 

Negotiated 1970 Salary Increases 82,623.00 

Add. En?>loyees Public Bldgs. 9,1 80.00 

Add. Employees Highway U,U70.00 

Add. Employees Engineering 6,^00.00 

Add. Employees Police 10,Ul4i4.00 

Add. En5>loyees Fire 7,liOli.93 

Con?). Police Time & \ 16,^00.^5 

Fire Dept. U2 hr. week 23,186.79 

Pur. Land Conservation Squibb 6,000.00 

Pur. Land Conservation Thrush 0.00 

Land for Recreation & Parks 

Hiller-Menges U, 000. 00 

Pur. Land Sch. Site Grange Hall 10,000.00 

Pur. Land Wilmington Grange Hall 10,000.00 

Pur. Land for Recreation Silver Lake 32,000.00 

Pur. Land for Recreation Silver Lake 1,3^0.00 

Pur. Land for Recreation Grove Avenue 31,0^0.00 
Proposed Drainage System , Tn. of Wilm. 29,899.27 

Completion of Dell Drive 9,728.71 

Veterans Retirement 11,181.36 

By-Law Study Committee 83.10 

Drug Dep. Prob. Committee 1,67^.00 

Eng. & Title Search Town-owned Land 103.62 

Demol. of Sub-Standard Structures 900.02 

MA.TURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 687,330.00 

General Government 7U,852.79 

Water 105,3^3.00 

Int. on Antic. Notes & Auth. Fees 5^,000.00 

922,535.79 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTS 1 

Woburn Street Addition 32,U08.22 

Shawsheen Avenue School U8l,U07.9l)i 

West Inter. School UOO.OOi 

Prepare Prel. Plans Elera. Sch. UjOOO.OO' 

Wilmington Memorial Library 22,33^.62; 

Construct Nichols St. Bridge 2,822.liOi 

West St. Water Main Impr. Fund 19,U07.li3i 

Construct Sewer Mains Eames St. 5,000.00 

Construct Sewers 11,000.00 

Hudson Street 31 .2li: 

Royal Street 1,890.00 

Develop Salem St. Well Field 2U9,8Uh.67 

Chestnut St. Well Field 1,255.38 

Main St. Well Field & Station 726.27 

Butters Row Well Site 1,130.00 

Develop Three Well Sites 8,368.69 

Ferguson Road 3,161.05 

Elwood Road 1,U27.50 

Floradale Avenue U26.2li 

West Street 3,030.00 

Esquire Estates Completion 2,OU0.7lj 

Tennis Courts Glen Road School 5O.00 

Tennis Courts Shawsheen School 6,li8U.73 
' Construct 60 ft. Add. High Garage and 

Replace Heat. System for Entire Bldg. 9,715.?6 
Purchase Land & Prepare Plans 

for New Inter. School 1 ,310.00 

869,672.72 



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151 



PLANNING for WILMINGTON 

Report for 
Wilmington Planning Board 
by Charles W. ELiot 
May 1970 

OMPREHENSIVE GENERAL PLAN 




Prepared in ths offices of Charles W. Eliot, Planning 
Consultant, for the Wilnnrngton Planning Bocrd and the 
Mass. Dept. of Commerce and Development, and financially 
aided Ihrough a Federal grant from the Deportment of 
Housing and Urban Development under the Urban Plan- 
ning Assistance Program authorized by Section 701 of 
the Housing Act of 1954, as amended. 



TOWN of WILMINaTON 
1968-1970 



Moderator 

Simon Cutter I968 
John M. Callan 1969 



Town Clerk 



Esther L. Russell 



Selectmen 



Town Manager 
Sterling C. Morris 



George W. Boylen, Jr. 

Chairman I968 
James P. Banda 

Chairman 1969 
Bruce MacDonald 1969 

Chairman 1970 
Charles H. Black - 1968 
Paul H. Niles - 1968 
Wavie M. Drew 
James R. Miceli 
Carl Backmati 1970 



Town Engineer 
Arthur E. Harding, Jr. 



Madelyn A. McKie 
Chairman 1968-1969 



Planning Board 



William G. Hooper, Jr< 
Chairman 1970 



A. Daniel Gillis 195^^-- 
William J. Hanlon 1968- 



Walter L. Hale, Jr. - 1968 



Morton Grant 1969- 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



Senator Ronald C. MacKenzie 
7th Middlesex District 



Representative Fred P. Cain 
25th Middlesex District 



CHARLES W. ELIOT 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT 



PLANNING CONSULTANT 



25 RESERVOIR STREET 



CAMBRIDGE. MASSACHUSETTS 02138 



TELEPHONE: 



KI RKLAND 7-37 14 



OMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



GARDENS AND ESTATES 



ITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING 



PARKS AND RECREATION AREAS 



May 31, 1970 



Mr. William Hooper, Chairman 
Wilmington Planning Board 
Wilmington, Mass. 0188? 

Dear Mr. Hooper, 

Our efforts over the past eighteen months have resulted in 
this report - "Planning for Wilmington." This is the so-called 
j "Master Plan" which the Town ordered at the Town Meeting in 
I March 1966, in the hope that planning and forethought would 
help to guide the forces of inevitable change towards a well- 
rounded and balanced Wilmington of the future. 

For convenience and reference, the report is presented in 
several parts with an "Introduction and Summary" which describes 
the work done and includes recommendations for action. 



This is your Consultant's Report (and I assume full 
responsibility for it), but I hope it reflects the thinking and 
desires of all the members of the Planning Board, - and through 
them the thinking of officials and citizens of Wilmington. I am 
greatly indebted to you and your fellow Board members for your 
help and cooperation, as well as to many other officials and 
citizens • 

I hope that you will succeed in securing action on the 
many proposals and recommendations contained in this report. 



Respectfully submitted. 




Planning Consultant 



PLANNING FOR WILMINGTON 
Prepared by Charles W. Eliot, Planning Consultant 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

INTRODUCTION 

A. Purposes of a Comprehensive General Plan - 
Goals, Pictures, Previous Planning 

B. Preparation of the Plan and Actions Taken 

Surveys and Data, Development of Plans, Actions Taken, 
A Continuing Process 

C. Summary Findings and Recommendations 

PART 1 - SURVEY - EXISTING CONDITIONS - INTRODUCTION 

A. Natural Features 

General Descriptions, Topography, Drainage Systems- 
Streams, Swamps and Ponds - Soils, Vegetation and Wildlife 

B. Historical Background 

Settlement, Farmsteads, Mills, Early Roads, 
Middlesex Canal, Railroad Era, Suburban Development, 
Automobile Age 

C. Regional Influences 

Location, Ipswich River Watershed Commission, MBTA, 
MDC Sewer, Neighboring Towns 

D. Existing Land Uses 

Base Maps, Neighborhoods, Ownerships, - Public and Tax Delinquent 
Houses, Agriculture, Business, and Industry 
Woodlands, Wetlands 

Highways^ Electric Lines, Utilities and Facilities 

E. Economic Base 

Occupations, Family Incomes, Employment of Residents, 
Employment in Wilmington, Spending Habits, Payrolls, etc. 

F. Questionnaire 
Appendix - 



PART II - PLANS AND PROPOSALS 



INTRODUCTION 

A. Population Projections 

Previous Projections 
Development Capacities 

B. Development Patterns - 

Residential, Business and Industrial 
Policies and Tools for Guidance 

C. Transportation and Circulation 

Streets and Highways 

Data and Standards, Major Projects and Major Street Plan 
and Subdivision Patterns, Parking, Street Names 

Rail, Bus, Auto Truck, and Air and Wires 

D. Open Spaces 

Conservation, Wellfields, Town Forest, Parks and 

Recreation 

Special Problems - 

Appendix - Form for Conservation Suirvey 

E. Utilities - 

Water, Sewer, Electricity, Storm Drainage, Pipe and 
Transportation Lines 

F. Facilities - 

Schools and Recreation 

Dump and Solid Wastes Disposal 

Town Offices 

Fire - Police - Communication Center 

G. General Plan - 

Short, Long and Utopian Ranges 

PART III - ZONING 

Background of Development to present. 
Proposed Further Actions - 

PART IV - SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS 

Review of Existing Regulations 
Revisions Proposed 

PART V - CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 

"Framework" and Data for 
Six Year Program 



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SCALE IN MILES 
M.O.C. SEWER. DISTRICT 



REGIONAL FACTORS 

Planning for Wilmington 



, METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING DISTRICT 
ENLARGED TO PRESENT SIZE ■ CHAPTER 588. ACTS OF 1966 
INITIAL LEGISLATION' CHAPTER 668, ACT OF 1963 



TO ACCOVIPAHY "70I" «JtPO«.T ©Y 
CUK«.ttS W.EUOT 



PLANNING FOR WILMINGTON 



COMPREHENSIVE PLAN 
Prepared by Charles W. Eliot, Planning Consultant 

INTRODUCTION 

All Planning is concerned with the interrelation of forces acting on or within a given area or 
function. In every case there are many of these "forces", hopes, ambitions, needs to be taken 
into account - and often they conflict. 

In every community - as in every individual - there are both yearnings for the past and 
hopes for the future - the desire for security and continuity, and at the same time, the eagerness 
for opportunity, improvement and growth. We want both to preserve and continue the proven 
values of the past and to provide better education, larger opportunities and improvements for the 
next generation. 

At the same time, we are all subject to fears or desires for power, money or "status" which 
bring out such ugly motives as greed and selfishness. Our communities - like individuals - have 
the same mixed values and the same needs for restraints, temperance, and forbearance. We need 
to "emphasize the positive" but not neglect control of negative influences. 

All planning is based on the assumption that growth and change are inevitable, that the only 
absolute certainty in life is change, - and that through planning we can influence change. It is 
always difficult for people to adjust to the forces of change. Our first reactions are always to 
resist. Every community within reasonable commuting distance of MetropoUtan Boston is certain 
to grow and change, and from the knowledge gained in meeting similar problems in comparable 
communities, it should be possible to develop policies, plans and programs to guide the growth of 
Wilmington. 

The problems to be faced are all related to "growth" but reflect the original or basic, 
physical characteristics of the area, the history of the community, and the investments and 
commitments already made for its development. We build on foundations already established - 
but sometimes have to rebuild or reinforce the foundations, and change or adapt the 
superstructure for new or changed uses. Planning must therefore be directed towards correction 
of past mistakes or present trends, and towards prevention of future errors and seizure of 
opportunities for desirable change. 

The opportunities for Wilmington lie in guidance of growth through encouragement of 
development by both private enterprise and pubhc action in accordance with agreed Goals, 
Objectives, Policies and Plans; and through the exercise of "those restraints which make men 
free" to prevent foreclosure of the future and actions against the common good. 



I 



A. PURPOSES OF COMPREHENSIVE GENERAL PLAN 



Every "Master Plan" or Comprehensive General Plan has at least three purposes: 

1 . To state or establish Goals or Objectives; 

2. To picture the future of the community in maps, diagrams and words as it might 
desirably appear in fifteen or twenty years; and 

3. To propose action to carry out the Plan. 

1. GOALS 

The proposals for "Wilmington Future" in the General Plan are directed towards: 

A. Protection of valued existing characteristics of the Town, and of environmental and property 
values against destruction, pollution, or avoidable loss. 

B. Effective use and maintenance of previous investments in streets and highways, schools and 
recreation facilities, public buildings and lands, and public services. 

C. Development of Residential, Commercial and Industrial Uses in Neighborhood Patterns, 
shaped by open spaces, and provided with services and amenities for the welfare of all the 
people. 

D. Provision of essential and desired facilities and services, - ranging from streets for access and 
to alleviate traffic congestion, through school and recreation, police and fire protection, 
water supply, solid waste disposal, and sewerage to Town offices and service buildings. 

E. Retention of opportunities for our successors tc adjust to new and presently unforeseen 
needs and to "inevitable change." 

Orderly growth requires advance planning for land use, traffic circulation and access, 
community facilities and the amenities. The Comprehensive General Plan presented in these pages 
is a further step in the continuing process of planning for those purposes. 



a 



2. WILMINGTON - FUTURE 



A "Master Plan" or Comprehensive General Plan is, in one sense, a picture of how the Town 
might look fifteen or twenty years hence. For Wilmington, it is a huge picture, covering 
17.08 square miles or 10,975 acres; and with an even larger background reflecting the influence 
of Metropolitan Boston and the Ipswich and Merrimack River Valleys. The colors in the picture 
represent the shapes and uses of land in woods, pastures, and swamps, and for different purposes 
of residence, business, industry, agriculture, recreation, conservation, etc. With the passage of 
time and inevitable change, all of these colors or land uses change. The design or structure in this 
picture reflects the economic functioning of the community and the forces of transportation and 
communication which play upon it. 

3. PREVIOUS PLANNING 

The people of Wilmington have been unusually aware of the necessity for guidance of 
actions, - large and small, by private and public agencies, - which cumulatively may either mar or 
ruin the picture or bring it to reahty. The Town has profited substantially from the many 
planning activities undertaken since the Planning Board was established in 1930. Among these 
activities, some that have most significantly affected the picture of "Wilmington Future" are: 

1. Zoning - first adopted in 1934, extensively revised in 1955 and further amended at 
frequent intervals since. 

2. Subdivision Regulations - reworked in 1955 and 1965. 

3. A General Plan Report - 1955-57 by Wilham Goodman of Planning and Renewal 
Associates - summarized in the 1957 Town Report. 

4. Studies for Water Supply and Sewerage Systems by Whitman and Howard in 1958. 

5. Street Names- 1958-59. 

6. A Report on Schools, Recreation and Capital Budget by Economic Development 
Associates in 1 960. 

7. Matching Funds offered by "Wilmington Industries" which made possible the 
employment of Consultants for: 

•a. Studies by Samuel P. Snow - 1963-66 on Apartments, Land Use near 1-93, revision 
of Zoning and Subdivision Regulations, etc. 

b. Preparation of reports and plans, by or under the direction of Charles W. Eliot, 
including: 

1 ) Preliminary Report - Planning for Wilmington - March 1 966 

2) Proposed Official Map - by Charles E. Downe 

3) Existing Land Uses - by Stephen Bartlett 

4) Open Spaces and Tax Delinquent Properties. 

c. Contract for an "Operational Soil Survey" with the U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 
1967. (completed 1969) 



3 



d. Application for a Flood Plain Report by the U.S. Corps of Engineers. 

e. Purchase of Air Photographs; and finally for 

f. Application and Funding for the "701 Planning Project" begun on July 23, 1968. 

While, of course, the major actions and decisions affecting the picture of "Wilmington 
Future" have been, are, and will be those of the people of the Town, the actions of neighboring 
towns and regional agencies - reflecting the growth of Metropohtan Boston and the importance of 
regional considerations - are of increasing significance to Wilmington. These "outside" planning 
activities have included: 

1 . Special Reports on the Bay Circuit 1955-56 leading to enactment of Chapter 631 - Acts 
of 1956. 

2. Planning Studies and Projects of the Eastern Mass. Regional Planning Project with 
Reports on Population, Economic Base, etc., and most importantly on Transportation. 

3. Metropolitan Area Planning Council Reports on 

a. Open Spaces and Recreation 

b. Guides for Progress 

c. Water and Sewers 

d. Solid Waste Disposal 

e. Housing, etc. 

4. Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority: Master Transit Plan 

5. Ipswich River - "Public Water Supply Resources" 1965 and organization and continuing 
work of the Ipswich River Watershed Commission. 

6. Merrimack Valley studies with special reference to sewerage in Tewksbury, adjoining the 
Silver Lake Section of Wilmington; 

7. Shawsheen Valley Technical High i n Billerica, just west of the Wilmington line - and 

8. Plans of Neighboring towns including those of 

a. . Woburn by Blackwell, 1959 and Metcalf and Eddy 1966-68, including studies for 

Industrial Development and Highways between Main Street and Interstate 93; 

b. Burlington Master Plan 1965 and studies for Water Supply and other projects close 
to the Wilmington line. 

c. Andover Master Plan 1965 by Adams, Howard and Opperman and Open Space 
Studies by Shurchff, 1969. 



B. PREPARATION OF PLAN AND ACTIONS TAKEN 



This Comprehensive General Plan for Wilmington has been prepared in accordance with a 
vote of the Tovi^n Meeting in March 1966 when the Town provided $10,000, with the assistance 
of "Wilmington Industries", for this purpose; and with the assistance of a "701" Planning 
Assistance Grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development of double the 
sum provided by the Town. 

As reported in the annual Town Reports, the services of Charles W. EUot, Planning 
Consultant and former Professor of City and Regional Planning at the Harvard Graduate School 
of Design, were secured through a contract with the Massachusetts Department of Commerce and 
Development (June 1 , 1968) to advise the Planning Board on the Comprehensive Planning Study. 
The project was officially launched at a meeting of July 23, 1968, at the Sweetheart Plastics 
Plant, of the Planning Board, Selectmen, Town Manager and other Town Officials, together with 
Representatives of "Wilmington Industries" and numerous citizens. 

Over a twenty-two months period, this Comprehensive General Plan has been prepared with 
the cooperation of Town Officials and the participation of large numbers of citizens, in the hope 
that it would express not just the thinking of the Planning Board, but the thoughtful views of all 
the townspeople. 

This Report on "Planning for Wilmington" is presented with an Introduction - including a 
Summary of Findings and Recommendations, and two Parts: Part I - SURVEY - Existing 
Conditions, and Part II - PLANS AND PROPOSALS. Additional Materials on Zoning, Subdivision 
Regulations and Capital Budget, etc. are separately submitted. 

1. SURVEYS AND DATA 



The first period of work for the preparation of this report was necessarily devoted primarily 
to gathering and interpretating the materials for Part I - SURVEY. The progress made during 
1968 was reported in detail in the Town Report for 1968. 

Attention was also given to pressing problems which could not wait for the completion of 
the Planning Program. Among these "special" situations which required time consuming and 
detailed consideration were: 

1. The collapse of the Shawsheen Ave. Bridge and the plans for a substitute location at 
Richmond Street; 

2. Proposals for a "Middle Belt", with "corridor" location and design studies by Highway 
Consultants, Howard, Needles, etc., to the Mass. Department of Public Works; and 
participation with other towns involved in the "SILC" project of the M. A.P.C. 

3. Proposal by the M.A.P.C., in its Open Space Plan, for a major "reservation" in southwest 
Wilmington and Burlington with two or more "retention-recreation" reservoirs; 

4. The status and disposition of "Town-Owned" and other Tax Delinquent Properties in 
Wilmington ; and 



S 



5. Proposals for "Conservancy" and Flood Plain Zoning to protect the wetlands of the 
Town against pollution, and the residents against flooding and the hazards of high water. 

Special reports and recommendations on each of these subjects were prepared and submitted 
to the Planning Board. 

During 1969, the work on Surveys and Data Collection, was, of course, continued, 
intensified and the draft chapters for this report put in semi-final form. Citizen participation by 
groups and individuals has greatly aided the project, and every request by the Board or its 
Consultant for information, assistance or conference with other Town officials and agencies has 
been met with cooperation. Projects aided in these ways included: 

1 . For the Natural Features Inventory, the Conservation Commission organized a series of 
Committees with specially quahfied citizens who identified, prepared lists and mapped 
the location of the "natural science and natural beauty" features of the Town. The 
Inventory included Botanic, Geologic, Ornithologic, and Natural Science Features, which 
in the opinion of the particular committee should be protected or enhanced. The 
participation of informed citizens in this endeavor has been especially valuable. These 
inventory materials, added to the considerable information previously gathered by the 
Conservation Commission, are now included in the Chapter on "Natural Features" in 
Part I of this Report. Their significance to the recommendations in the Open Space Plan 
(in Part II) is discussed in that section. 

2. For the Chapter of Historical Background , Captain Larz Neilson provided a wealth of 
materials and editorial review. 

3. Questionnaire. Because the Planning Board was anxious to have the Comprehensive 
General Plan reflect the views and desires of their fellow townspeople, a Planning 
Questionnaire was initiated with the help of the Consultant, and mailed to everyone 
receiving water services in the Town on January 3, 1969. Some 1040 householders (about 
a quarter of those questioned) filled out and returned the questionnaires, - a most 
encouraging indication of the eager interest and concern of the townspeople in the 
future of the Town. 

Coding and tabulation of the returns have provided data on land use and residences, on 
commuting and shopping travel, lot sizes, industrial development, conservation policies, 
etc.; and stimulated comments and suggestions on what is "Right about Wilmington" or 
bad about existing conditions, and what improvements or changed policies should be 
considered in the "Master Plan." These results are reviewed in a "Questionnaire" Chapter 
of Part I. 

4. Employees' Residences and Places of Work. Records were made available by AVCO, and, 
through the cooperation of the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce, by five other major 
employers in the Town, from which "origin and destination" traffic lines have been 
derived. These data, combined with figures on commuting and shopping habits of 
Wilmington residents from the Questionnaire have helped to locate points of traffic 
congestion requiring attention. 

The Consultant, his Associates, and Assistants have continued work on Inventory Data for 
Part I of the Report and as special information was needed in connection with the preparation of 
plans and proposals on Open Space, Streets and Highways, Schools, etc. These materials have 



included information on land uses, roads and traffic, population trends and economic data, 
"capacity" for growth under existing zoning, and planning activities in neighboring towns. 

The "Operational Soil Survey" for Wilmington has been prepared by the U.S. Soil 
Conservation Service under a separate contract with the Town. AH of the field work was 
completed by August 1, 1968, and maps and reports on soils and "soil association" in different 
parts of the Town were delivered on May 20, 1969. The report records the soils and reviews the 
suitability of soils for a variety of uses, and the severity of limitations on those uses due to soil 
conditions. The Soil Survey is summarized in Chapter A of Part I. 

2. PRELIMINARY PLANS AND PROGRESS REPORT 

On February 4, 1969, Preliminary Plans and a Progress Report on all of the work under the 
"701" Planning Project to that date were presented to a meeting of Town Officers, citizens and 
officials of the Mass. Department of Community Affairs at the New Memorial Library. Maps were 
exhibited and explained by the Consultant and his associates. Well over 100 persons attended the 
meeting and participated in the general discussion of the possible lines of action and policy 
outlined by the Chairman of the Planning Board and the Planning Consultant. With the helpful 
suggestions and criticisms obtained from that meeting work then proceeded on the revision and 
amplification of these preliminary studies. 

3. DEVELOPMENT OF PLANS 

Proposals for future land use, open space, commercial and industrial development; for streets 
and highways; schools and public facilities, and for utiHties have been developed by the 
Consultant in drafts for discussion with the Planning Board and with the Town Officers and 
others particularly concerned; and re-worked to form the Chapters in Part II of the Planning 
Report. These Proposals are summarized in a later section with recommendations for priorities 
and actions. 

For this work, the Planning Board and the Consultant have kept in close touch with the 
Town Manager and have met with the Selectmen, Finance Committee, Conservation Commission, 
School Committee, Permanent Building Committee, and other Town Officials to review with 
them problems and procedures, sources of data, and possible policies and programs. There have 
also been meetings with the Planning Boards from adjoining towns, with the Ipswich River 
Watershed Commission and with the Towns in the corridor proposed for the Middle Belt under 
the so-called "SILC" (Subregional Intertown Liaison Committee) project of the Metropolitan 
Area Planning Council. Since both the Chairman of the Planning Board and the Consultant are 
members of the Executive Committee of the M.A.P.C. the relationship between regional and local 
planning proposals has received constant attention. The Planning Consultant has conferred with 
State Officials at the Department of Public Works, Department of Commerce and Development, 
Department of Community Affairs and Department of Natural Resources for data and 
information on projects and proposals affecting Wilmington. 

During the period of the "701 Planning Project", the Planning Consultant has been assisted 
in the work by Duncan Hughes, Charles W. March, and by Roy Mann, who is primarily 
responsible for the Open Space Plan. 



7 



4. IMPLEMENTATION AND ASSISTANCE 



Under our form of government and with our reliance on initiative by private enterprise, 
actions to carry out plans will depend on a multitude of decisions by many people. It is hoped 
that the "picture" of how Wilmington might look fifteen or twenty years hence may suggest to 
owners or developers of properties, some of the possibilities which would benefit both themselves 
and the whole community. Certainly one of the purposes in preparing a Comprehensive Plan is to 
encourage, induce, and guide private actions in the public interest. 

At the same time, it is necessary - as noted earlier -to restrain those who might act or 
propose actions contrary to the plan or which would prevent others or the Town itself from 
carrying out particular projects which are important elements of the plan. Furthermore, the 
Town should see to it that actions by private developers do not impose undue burdens on the 
general public, - both immediately or at a future date. 

Governments, at all levels from Town and County or Regional through State and 
Federal, - can and should take many actions to bring the picture nearer reality and to protect the 
future against unwise commitments in the present. 

It is well known, for instance, that the opening of a new road, highway improvements, or the 
availability of water, sewers and utilities, or the construction of a new school are positive 
influences in the manner and direction of private investment. By the provision and timing of 
"public improvements" or by the deliberate withholding of services, government can and does 
effect the where and when of growth and development. 

The "Master Plan" includes many proposals for "improvements" which might be provided 
with varying division of costs among different levels of government according to the nature of the 
project and the availability of funds under Federal and State Laws. 

Federal participation is through grants-in-aid to or through the State for highways, 
transportation, open spaces, education, housing, community facihties, welfare and planning. The 
policies of the Federal government in providing these aids and funds are increasingly in the 
direction of making all or any assistance dependent on a showing that the projects are consistent 
with regional or metropohtan plans. 

Direct State action and responsibility is assured for such highways as Interstate 93, Route 
125, Route 38 and the substitute bridge over the railroad at Richmond Street. Negotiations have 
been begun for State participation in a New Route 129, and for improved access to the Industrial 
Area. Through employment of Highway Consultants, Howard, Needles, Tammen and Bergendoff, 
the State Department of Public Works has developed alternative plans for the "Middle Belt" 
across Wilmington. 

The Town has applied for and received grants-in-aid for the acquisition of "open spaces" 
from State and Federal Sources. 

Indirect action from the State will also be involved in relation to regional problems of 
solid-waste disposal, air pollution control, water pollution abatement (particularly of the Ipswich 



8 



River), regional schools, etc.; and, as noted elsewhere, as the source of grants-in-aid for a variety 
of projects. 

The initiative to seek State or Federal assistance or participation lies with the Town. The 
existence of the Comprehensive General Plan should be helpful to the Town in ordering the 
projects for which it may seek State or Federal assistance, and should also be helpful to the State 
and Federal agencies in appraising the significance of such projects to the future of the Town and 
of the related neighboring communities. 

The County of Middlesex is also involved in the implementation of plans - particularly for 
County Roads and Chapter 90 road improvements. The assistance of the County has been sought 
in connection with the project for a "New Route 129" by -passing Wilmington Plaza. 

Regional Planning considerations are also important to assure cooperation with neighboring 
municipalities. Membership in the Metropolitan Area Planning Council facilitates such co- 
operation and fulfills the prerequisite for receiving a variety of aids from the Federal 
Government - for open space grants, housing and urban renewal, water and sewer facil- 
ities - because applications for such grants have to be certified by a Regional Planning Agency as 
in accordance with regional plans. 

Since Wilmington lies on the outer edge of the M.A.P.C. District, Plans for the future of the 
Town must also be related to proposals in the Ipswich River Valley and Merrimack River Valley. 
That means cooperation with the Regional Planning Agencies centered in Lowell and Lawrence, 
and with the Ipswich River Watershed Commisssion. 

The Town is the key governmental agency for implementation of plans, - both for land 
acquisition, road improvements, new schools and facilities, etc., and also for guidance of private 
investment and actions. 

The burden of "controlling" actions which might work against carrying out of the plan falls 
almost entirely on the local government under enabling legislation enacted by the General Court. 
The Town can act to protect the public interest through zoning, subdivision regulations, health 
and building regulations and other procedures under the police power. The "Master Plan" 
includes proposals for "positive" zoning which, it is hoped, will encourage the best use of land 
and discourage or prevent uses which are contrary to the plan. Detailed recommendations for 
Zoning changes. Subdivision Regulations and a Framework for a Capital Budget are contained in 
Parts III, IV and V of the General Plan Report. 

5. ACTIONS TAKEN DURING PLANNING PERIOD 

While the "General Plan" was being prepared actions affecting the work have, of course, 
continued, and the Planning Consultant has participated in many of the conferences when 
projects and proposals were in preparation. 

a. Zoning. At the 1969 Town Meeting, the Town failed to register the necessary two-thirds 
vote to amend the Zoning By-law to include a "Conservancy District", as proposed by the 
Planning Board. This proposal was intended to protect the wetlands of the Town against 



TEWK 




destruction by filling or building and against pollution of water supply sources. On the other 
hand, the Town Meeting followed the recommendations of the Planning Board - approving or 
rejecting other articles relating to Zoning, including approval of a petition to the General Court 
for exemption from the 50 foot lot provisions of the Zoning Enabling Act, repeal of the 
"Stadium" provisions, and numerous other changes. 

The General Court enacted a special bill introduced by Representative Cain as requested by 
the Town to state that "Section 5-A of Chapter 40A of the General Laws shall not apply to the 
Town of Wilmington." 

A second attempt - on a much more limited scale - to establish Flood Plain Zoning at the 
1970 Annual Town Meeting also failed, but the Town approved some of the other Zoning 
Changes and turned down the petitions brought by private parties. 

b. Land Acquisition and Assignment of "Town-Owned" lands to Town Agencies for public 
purposes has continued, with particular attention to the furtherance of the so-called "Hathaway 
Acres" project between Charlotte Drive and Martins Brook, and the acquistion of properties on 
the shores of Silver Lake. A vote of the 1969 Town Meeting to acquire the Grange Property was 
somehow "defective", but corrective action was taken in 1970. 

The Planning Board, its Consultant, the Town Manager and Town Treasurer have devoted a 
great deal of study to the status and appropriate disposition of the "Town-Owned" and other 
Tax Title properties in the Town. Several parcels have been transferred to the Conservation 
Commission by votes of the 1969 and 1970 Town Meetings. The recommendations for open 
space, well-fields. School sites and other public lands in the General Plan reflect those studies in 
specific proposals for assignment of parcels to particular Town agencies. 

c. Streets and Highways: The 1969 and 1970 Town Meetings "accepted the layouts" for a 
number of streets and street widenings which are parts of the Major Street Plan. These projects 
included, most importantly, the Town approved action by the State to relocate the Shawsheen 
Avenue Bridge. This project is close to that recommended in the 1957 General Plan and a first 
step in provision of "A New Route 129" which has been the subject of numerous meetings with 
the Town Manager, Selectmen, and Representative Cain. Studies by the Planning Consultant and 
the Town Engineer for a by-pass of Main Street - incorporating the "Olson Street Project" have 
been presented to the Mass. Department of Public Works, and are currently the basis for a layout 
by the County Commissioners. 

Similarly, street projects for service of industries in the southeast corner of Wilmington and 
in Woburn have been studied and discussed at great length with Town Officers, Representative 
Cain and the D.P.W. The Consultant's recommendations are included in the Summary of the 
Streets and Highways Plan. 

The "Middle Belt" project for a limited access highway midway between Route 128 and 
Interstate 495 as proposed by the State has been steadfastly opposed, and in the past six months 
Wilmington has been joined in this fight by six other towns along the proposed route of this 
highway in the "SILC" planning project. 



II 



The replacement of the Nichols Avenue bridge over the railroad is proceeding according to 
plans with current discussion of the need for widening and sidewalks to the Tewksbury line. The 
Planning Board continues to "process" a large number of "Subdivisions" involving decisions on 
roads and wetlands. 

d. Library and Schools. The new Public Library was completed and opened in 1969 - (and 
used for the meeting at which the Open Space Plan was presented). 

The studies and reports by John Miller of Hill and Associates on School Needs have 
occasioned meetings and discussion of a new or an addition to the High School, a new South 
Intermediate School or enlargement of the North and West Intermediate Schools, and the 
outlook for additional Elementary Schools and the use or conversion of outdated facilities. The 
new Shawsheen School has been constructed. These studies and actions are of special interest to 
the Planning Board in relation to "site" considerations and to desirable "multiple use" of 
expensive facilities. 

e. Industrial Development of the DiCenso and Barbo Industrial Tracts and off Andover 
Street, has advanced rapidly over the past two years. (In July, the Town Crier noted that in the 
first six months of 1969 "Construction Permits for Industrial Construction exceeded 
$4,000,000.") 

f. By-Law Committee. The 1969 Town Meeting authorized a special By-Law Study Com- 
mittee which was granted an extension to 1971 for its study of revisions in the Building Codes 
and other by-laws. 

g. Sewerage and Drainage. The Town has taken steps for extension of sewers and for further 
studies of drainage by Whitman and Howard. 

h. Citizens Planning Advisory Committee. Through the efforts of the Planning 
Board - under the leadership of Chairman Madelyn McKie, a Citizens Planning Advisory 
Committee was formed at a meeting on April 29, 1970 and at a second meeting Task Forces were 
organized to study and propose actions to implement the proposals of the "General Plan." 

6. PLANNING - A CONTINUING PROCESS 

From the foregoing account of "actions taken", it is clear that many planning proposals for 
Wilmington are still "in process." In the discussion of the "Survey" and the "Plan" which 
follows, a number of items of unfinished business are also noted. 

a. Base Maps: 

1. To keep up to date the base maps and records of land uses (including 
non-conforming uses under the Zoning By-law) with addition of new streets and 
buildings as they are constructed. 

2. To continue the Town Engineer's work to up-date the Assessor's Maps with 
recordings of transfers in ownership and changes in boundary Unes. 

3. To develop and maintain listings of Public Ways with record of widths of right 
of way, pavement, etc., and of sidewalks, water mains, sewers, etc. 



b. Surveys and Special Studies are needed for: 



1. Bench marks to establish elevations of areas subject to perennial or "15 year 
floods", - as basis for application of Flood Plain or Conservancy Zoning. 

2. Appointment and Study of an Historic District Study Committee as required for 
establishment of Historic Districts and protection of historic sites as provided in 
Chapter 40C, General Laws. 

3. Code Reviev^ by the By-law Study Committee, - utilizing the experience in 
neighboring towns and the so-called "National Codes" - B.O.A.C. 

4. Surveys and Layouts for Streets and Widenings - both in fee and for "building 
lines." 

c. Planning Administration: 

1. to provide professional - planning and/or engineering - review and advice to the 
Planning Board on proposed zoning changes and on all subdivision projects including 
engineering inspection during construction of road and drainage projects. 

2. to develop and revise annually by joint action of the Finance Committee, Selectmen 
and Planning Board, a Capital Budget for submission to the annual Town Meeting. 

3. to further amend and revise the Zoning By-law and Zoning Map for application of a 
Flood Plain District to Flood Plains, an "Institutional" District to Pubhc and 
semi-public properties, and with consideration of Planned Unit Development or 
"Cluster Zoning", grouping of business areas to replace "strip zoning", and similar 
improvements or possibiHties. 

4. to up-date and adopt an "Official Map" in order to eliminate many "paper streets" 
and to project and protect major highway and park (open space) projects. 

5. to review and revise the Subdivision Regulations periodically in order to maintain 
standards for improvements in new subdivision at least equal to those in 
neighboring or comparably situated towns. 

6. to continue membership in the Metropolitan Area Planning Council with active 
participation in its work, - particularly to further cooperation with neighboring 
towns and with State agencies on planning projects of regional significance. 

7. to meet with planning boards of neighboring towns at regular intervals (at least once 
a year) for exchange of information on policies and proposals. 

8. to work with and through the Citizens Planning Advisory Committee for the greater 
public understanding and implementation of the proposals in the General Plan. 

9. to re-evaluate - constantly - all the proposals in this report in the light of changing 
conditions and changing needs. 

This report and this plan will be most useful in so far as it is considered as a Step in the 
Planning Process, - as a dynamic rather than static plan. There is always a danger that a Town, 
having developed a so-called "Master Plan", will relax rather than intensify efforts to guide 
growth and change in the community. If the time, effort, and expense of work on the 
comprehensive general plan are to return full value, the planning initiated in the preparation of 
the Master Plan must be continued with constant re-evaluation of goals, objectives, procedures, 
projects and programs. 



Planning is a continuing process, - building on the past. Continuity is a key ingredient of 
progress. "The Past is Prologue. " We should treasure the evidences of past accomplishments and 
maintain the institutions and examples we have inherited. 

Since "nothing is certain in this world except change": 

Planning must always be "open-ended" - subject to change. The philosophy of Herodi- 
tus - cryptically summarized in the two words, "It flows" - stresses not only continuity with the 
past, but also anticipation of new challenges, new ways and new accomplishments in the future. 
We must not tie the hands or foreclose the options for succeeding generations to meet the 
problems of their day or to seize new opportunities to improve the conditions of life. 



IS 



PHYSICAL FEATURES 



WETLANDS 
HIGH TERRAIN 
ESKERS 

SIGNIFICANT HABITATS 

- WILDFOWL 

- OTHER WILDLIFE 

- PLANTLIFE 
MIDDLESEX CANAL 

- TRACES IN GOOD CONDITION 

- TRACES IN FAIR CONDITION 
ABANDONED R.R. GRADE 
POWER TRANSMISSION LINES 
TOWN DUMP 




<5 /r^N 



Wl LM I NGTO N 

WILMINGTON PLANNING BOARD 
CHARLES W. ELIOT, PLANNING CONSULTANT 



0.5 mile 1.0 



C. SUMMARY 



FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 
1. FINDINGS 

The Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts, hes along the northern edge of Middlesex County 
with its center (Town Hall) sixteen (16) miles north of Boston, ten (10) miles south of Lawrence, 
eleven (11) miles southeast of Lowell and fifteen (15) miles west of Salem. The towns 
surrounding Wilmington are clockwise: - Andover on the north, North Reading and Reading on 
the east, Woburn and Burlington on the south and Billerica and Tewksbury on the west. 

Wilmington is a member of the Boston Metropolitan Area Planning Council and lies at the 
midpoint of the northern boundary of the M.A.P.C. district. The town is also a member of the 
Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, the Metropolitan Sewer District, and of the Ipswich 
River Watershed Commission, - since it contains most of the headwaters of that river. The Town 
shares with Bedford, Billerica, Burlington and Tewksbury responsibihty for the Shawsheen Valley 
Technical High School which is located in Billerica near the Wilmington line. 

Natural Features* 

The boundaries of Wilmington enclose 17.08 square miles or 10,957 acres. The topography 
has been described as "shallow" with a general range in elevation between 75 feet and 120 feet 
above mean sea level. Over a quarter of the town's acres are wetlands, - constituting the 
headwaters of the Ipswich River. The lowest elevation is 70 feet above m.s.l. on the Ipswich River 
at the town line shared with Reading and North Reading. A ridge reaching 200 ft. elevation Ues 
along the southwest (Burlington) line and the highest crest - 255 feet - is found in the extreme 
north overlooking Foster's Pond. 

The patterns and shapes of the presently "developed" areas in Wilmington reflect these 
physical conditions and features, the controlling forces at the times of settlement and 
development, and the timing and types of transportation facilities which have been provided. 

The extensive wetlands and "low topography" at the headwaters of the Ipswich River have 
effectually limited and shaped "developments" on the uplands or to areas which could be 
economically drained or safeguarded against floods. Four major tributaries of the Ipswich River, 
with the swamps along them have divided the uplands into "neighborhoods" or developed areas. 
The order of settlement of the uplands also has reflected the soils, - their value for agriculture or 
their abihty to absorb sanitary wastes from building developments. 

Historical Background* 



The early settlers in New England invariably sought out the best agricultural soils in order to 
assure their self-sufficiency or survival in the pre-industrial era. They were also attracted to 



*For detailed discussion under each of these headings see the corresponding Chapter in Part 
I or II. 

\7 



HISTORIC FEATURES 



1=J 



HOUSES 



HOUSES STILL EXISTING 



MILLS 



EARLIEST ROADS 




Wl LM I NGTO N 

WILMINGTON PLANNING BOARD 
CHARLES W. ELIOT, PLANNING CONSULTANT 



"falling water" for their lumber and grist mills. Since the Industrial Revolution, the choices by 
men of places to live have been more influenced by accessibility to where they were employed, 
where they shopped, or where educational, recreational and other facilities were available. 

Transportation facilities in successive periods of Wilmington's history have been a third 
major factor in the location and timing of development. The Town's present "patterns" can be 
traced to the earliest roads, to the construction of the Middlesex Canal, and to the several 
railroads which traversed the area in the middle 1 800's. Then followed the "Street Railway Era" 
which also provided routes across Wilmington from Boston to the Merrimack Valley Cities, and 
provoked a rash of speculative subdivision projects. Now, in the "Automobile Age", we have 
become dependent on trucks and cars - which, for their numbers and speeds, require new and 
wider roads and expressways, as well as parking areas. Development - particularly for business and 
industry - depends on one or another of these transportation facilities and is stimulated by their 
existence and efficiency. The significance of these transportation factors is evidenced in 
Wilmington by the rapid growth of industry near and since the opening of Interstate 93. 

The town has grown ten-fold in population over the past 60 years from 1858 in 1910 to 
17,011 in 1970. 

The figures are: 1920- 2581 1955 - 9,408 

1930-4013 1960- 12,475 

1940-4645 1965 - 15,261 

1950-7039 1970- 17,011 

These residents live almost exclusively in single-family houses. The 1960 Housing Census 
recorded 96% of the housing structures with only one unit and new apartments have not been 
permitted since that time. Over 89% of all housing units were owner-occupied in 1 960. 

Existing Land Uses* 

Analysis of the Existing Land Uses - as recorded in 1968 - shows that of the total area of 
10,957 acres in Wilmington, lands which were considered "developed" or committed, included: 

Residential Business Industry Open Space & Public R/W etc Total 

2132 159 269 492 670 3722 acres 

or 34% of the total area. Of the remaining area 26% is so wet as to impose "severe limitations" on 
development, as indicated in the Soil Survey. 

Development Capacities 

In order to project the location and amount of future development in Wilmington a study 
was made of the "Development Capacities" of the Town. For this study the same 
"Neighborhoods" used in the 1957 General Plan and the 1960 School and Recreation Study, 
were again used, but the figures reflected the 1968 Zoning requirements and Land Uses. A 
further factor of "Buildable Area" was also apphed, - excluding wetlands and existing parks, 



)9 



WILMINGTON 

EXISTING & ultimate: f 




schools, etc. The resulting figures show undeveloped "Buildable" Areas now zoned for: 



Residental Business Industr y Total 

3801 100 936 4837 Acres 

Although a percentage of this "buildable" area will have to be used for streets and other 
public uses, there is room in Wilmington for substantial potential increases for each of the 
residential, business and industrial categories in the Town as a whole but with huge differences 
among the thirteen neighborhoods or sectors according to the amounts of existing development 
and wetlands. It should be stressed that these figures reflect the present zoning which is always 
subject to change. 

From these same calculations on Buildable Areas, estimates of "potential" population 
growth were also developed. 

Population Growth Estimates 

There have been a variety of estimates on the future growth of population in Wilmington 
according to the purposes involved and using different assumptions concerning controlling 
influences. In the Population Chapter several of these estimates are reviewed with explanations 
and comments on their significance. For example: 

The 1957 General Plan Report contained five different procedures for population 
projections to 1980 with results ranging in totals for the town from 15,000 to 36,000. From 
those studies a figure of 19,000 was chosen as the number for whom planning should provide in 
1980. 

The 1960 School and Recreation Report on "Schools and Recreation" analyzed the Sectors 
referred to above for "existing and potential dwelling units" in each sector, and came out with an 
"ultimate" 7371 d.u. in the Town. If that number is multiphed by 3.5 or 3.9 for the size of 
household, the population would reach 25,000 to 28,700. The authors of that report concluded 
that "Wilmington's ultimate population would approximate 30,000," and "moreover this 
saturation point is likely to be reached in the next 20 years" or by 1 980. 

The Metropolitan Area Planning Council also has prepared population projections for its area 
and for each of its member municipalities in connection with the Eastern Mass. Regional Planning 
Project. These projections provide estimated population figures for 1970, 1975 and low and high 
estimates for 1990 - 

1965 1970 1975 1990 Lo 1990 Hi 

Wilmington 15,550 19,100 23,000 25,200 27,000 

For this "701 Planning Project", the study of Development Capacities also included 
estimated figures for population at "ultimate" development for each of the thirteen sectors. The 
total "ultimate" population for the Town came out at 36,877, and was arrived at by 
"straight-line projections" based on assumptions of continuance of present zoning, densities of 
development, household size, etc. Since all of these factors are certain to change the calculations 



From more complete account in Chapter - A. Population in Part II. 



are correspondingly certain to be in error, but they do. confirm the 1957 estimates of a probable 
maximum figure for ultimate development. 

It should also be noted that the rate of growth in any one of the 1 3 sectors, while it might 
someday reach the "ultimate", will vary greatly according to accessibility and when properties 
are available or subdivided. 

Residential construction over the past 20 years is reflected in building permits which 
averaged - 



In spite of the low rate of new housing construction in recent years, the world-wide 
"population explosion" and concentration in MetropoHtan areas make it appear inevitable that, 
whenever the "money market" permits, there will be a sharp increase in the number of residential 
building permits in Wilmington. 

With all these various estimates and projections in mind, a new projection has been 
attempted as shown on the following chart: 



140 per year from 1951-54 

152 per year from 1955-59 with an all-time high of 185 in 1955 
130 per year from 1960-64 and 
81 per year from 1965-69 with a low of only 11 in 1965. 



36.861 -| 



POPULATION PROJECTIONS 
WILMINGTON, MASS. 




PROJECTIONS - I95T 
GENERAL PLAN 



PAST GROWTH -1930-1970 
U.S.DECENKilAL CENSUS 
MASSACHUSETTS- 5 YEAR 





lo 



To Accom]panY RejaorV 
bYChar\&6W. t\\a\; 



O 



1970 



o 



o 



a- 



o 
In 



to 
to 



o 



in 



O 




O 



Regional Influences 



The problems and opportunities facing the citizens of Wilmington cannot be met by 
Wilmington alone ;- cooperative action with neighboring Municipahties, the County, the 
Metropolitan and Regional Agencies and the State is required. These relationships are illustrated 
by the Map on the inside of the front cover of this report. Municipal Boundaries seldom, if ever, 
define the limits of "functional" problems and plans: 

Thus for Water Resource Planning the whole of the Ipswich River Watershed must be 
considered, with the possibility of supplementary supplies from the Concord or the Merrimack 
Rivers and possible diversion of water to other parts of Metropolitan Boston. For this purpose 
Wilmington is a member of the Ipswich River Watershed Commission, and the Water Supply 
studies of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council(of which the Town is also a member) include 
Wilmington. 

Similarly for Open Space Planning, Sewerage, Highways and Transit, and Patterns of 
Development, the Town looks to the M.A.P.C., M.D.C., and several State agencies for planning 
assistance and implementation of planning projects. For Solid Waste Disposal cooperation with 
neighboring municipalities appears to be the only way the problem can be solved. 

Frequent inter-town meetings are needed to keep abreast of problems arising along or near 
Town Boundaries in connection with roads and subdivisions, zoning, and provision of municipal 
services. It is generally beUeved that the costs of some of these services could be reduced by 
contracts or agreements between towns for sharing specialized and expensive equipment. 

These and other related subjects are discussed in the Chapter C. Regional Influences in Part I 
of this Report. 

Economic Base 

The available data on the Occupations, Incomes and Places of Employment of Wilmington 
residents and Employees and Payrolls of Wilmington firms, value of manufactures and retail 
trade, etc. is reviewed in the Chapter on Economic Base in Part I, and records the doubling of 
payrolls in the past five years. 

Other Findings 

The highly successful Questionnaire conducted in Wilmington provided not only factual 
information but also many opinions - all of which have been taken into consideration for the 
General Plan. A summary of the results is contained in Part I. Finally, it was found useful to 
present the data on some aspects of the Plan in direct relation with the recommendations on 
those subjects in Part II of this Report. The reader is referred to Part II and the Chapters on Open 
Space Plan, Streets and Highways, Other Transportation Facilities and Public Buildings and 
Facilities for text, tables and maps showing existing conditions and data. 



23 



2. RECOMMENDATIONS 



The patterns and shapes of the presently "developed" areas in Wilmington reflect the 
physical conditions and features, the controlling forces at the times of settlement and 
development, and the timing and types of transportation which have been provided. These and 
other forces are still operating in Wilmington. 

It is impossible to predict for any extensive period in the future what properties may be on 
the market for development. In the preparation of long range plans for a community it is, 
therefore, necessary to assume that "anything can happen", and to try to influence change in an 
orderly fashion for the long range benefit of the whole community. 

Under our American "culture" the powers of the Town and public agencies to control the 
direction and timing of community growth are severely limited. We Americans, having 
"conquered the wilderness" and profited mightily from the constant increase in land values over 
three centuries, have strong views about private property and the "right to do with our own 
whatever we please." It has been said that "Americans have a 'Divine Right' to speculate in land." 

These attitudes are in marked contrast to those in older civilizations and cultures - such as 
those of Europe, where public policies of taxation and more direct controls have limited 
speculation in land. Where we regard land as just a "Commodity", they put more stress on the 
public interest in the essential aspects of life - land, water, and air. 

To influence and guide the forces of change and development, Massachusetts Cities and 
Towns have some "planning tools" - which are unfortunately limited in effectiveness but the 
best available. They include some controls under the Police Power, the authority to acquire and 
hold properties for public purposes, and the choice, in some instances, of whether to provide or 
withhold public improvements and services. The Town should exercise all the authority it can 
muster to guide development under: 

A. The Police Power, through: 

1 . Zoning Regulations , controlling uses of lands and buildings, including densities of 
land use, heights of buildings and yards, etc.; 

2. Health Regulations , - particularly in relation to disposal of wastes, - both sanitary 
and otherwise; 

3. Building and Housing Codes, - for safety and health; 

4. Subdivision Regulations , with requirements for installation of improvements and 
facilities directly serving new lots; and maintaining standards at least equal to those 
of neighboring towns. 

5. Official Map to define the responsibility of the Town for "Paper Streets", to 
protect the bed of mapped streets and proposed parks and to encourage 
re-subdivision of areas to eliminate sub-standard lots. 

B. Public Ownership of Lands and rights-in-land, including authority to: 

1. Acquire, develop and maintain properties for Open Spaces, Conservation, Rec- 
reation, Schools and Public Facilities; and to 

2.H 



2. Lay out Streets and Building Lines. 



C. Public Action for Urban Renewal and Development. 

D. Provision or Withholding of Facilities and Services such as 

L Schools, 2. Water, 3. Sewer, 4. Waste Collection and Disposal, and 5. Public 
Buildings, - guided in part by: 

E. A Capital Improvement Budget or Program to provide and time the investments by the 
Town in capital projects so as to encourage the orderly development of the Town. 

Parts III, IV and V of this Report - (separately submitted) include detailed recommendations 
on Zoning, Subdivision Regulations and Capital Budget - respectively, but the relationship of 
those proposals to the Patterns of Development are discussed below. 

As noted above, there is no way of knowing in what order areas in Wilmington will be 
developed for residence, business or industry, because properties come on the market when an 
advantageous sale may be possible or an estate has to be broken up to satisfy the heirs. It is, 
therefore, important that property owners and Town Officials should know what areas should be 
reserved for public purposes and what future streets and highways should be provided, as well as 
what densities and distribution of population must be served with schools, water, sewer and other 
public facilities. The General Plan presents proposals and recommendations to those ends. As part 
of the process of continuous planning and from time to time, as one or another area or section of 
Wilmington is affected by a proposed development, sketch plans for alternative arrangements of 
streets, open spaces, lots and services will be needed in order to check specific projects against the 
long-range needs of the larger area in which the specific project is located. 



25 



A. PATTERNS OF DEVELOPMENT 



The Findings in the previous section of this report stress the major influences of soil 
conditions, wetlands and transportation facilities on the settlement and growth of Wilmington. 
Brooks and wetlands, railroads and Interstate 93 presents barriers which divide the Town into 
neighborhoods. The studies of Development Capacities for the 1957, 1960 and this Planning 
Report have all referred to the same neighborhoods or sections in relation to zoning and 
population projections. 

The Zoning By-Law of Wilmington and the Zoning Map further divide the Town among six 
kinds of districts according to uses: - three for different densities of residential development, two 
for business and one for industry . All of the Town falls in one or another of these districts 
regardless of public ownership or physical fitness. In the areas zoned for industry, only dwellings 
which are "accessory" to the industrial uses of the property are permitted, so that the Industrial 
Districts are in effect separate "sections" and constitute further barriers between and defining 
residential "neighborhoods." Similarly the General Business Districts, because of their location 
on principal transportation routes, tend to reinforce the barriers between "neighborhoods." 

In order to further shape the patterns of development into "Neighborhoods" - and at the 
same time protect development against floods, pollution, etc., it is proposed to add a "Flood 
Plain District" to the Zoning Map applying initially to areas subject to flooding along the main 
streams, but extended to other wetlands as flood data becomes available from surveys or the 
anticipated report by the U.S. Corps of Engineers. A form of Conservancy Zoning is 
recommended for the extensive headwater swamps. Under the "Open Space Plan", discussed 
below. Flood Plain and Conservancy Zoning would be backed up by Conservation Easements and 
fee title public ownership of much of the wetlands. Whatever the Town does to protect its 
wetlands against unwise development, the State will also be acting under the Hatch Act and the 
Inland Wetlands Act through the issuance of "Orders" limiting uses and changes in wet areas. 

Around, within and among the neighborhoods or areas proposed for development there are 
or will be public or semipublic properties devoted to public or institutional purposes. To 
recognize the importance of those purposes to the community, and to guide land uses and 
developments within those properties a second new "Institutional or Public Use" District is 
proposed to be added to the Zoning Map which will include the well-fields, conservation areas, 
schools and recreation grounds, church properties and other institutions which may locate in the 
Town. 

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT 

For over forty years planning theory in this country has placed great stress on the concept of 
"The Neighborhood Unit" ^ for the organization of residential areas. The idea is that within a city 
or town there are or should be "units" of residential development, centered around a 



"The Neighborhood Unit" by Clarence A. Perry in pp 22-132 of Vol II-Regional Survey of New 
York and Environs, 1929. 



Zl 



neighborhood school and bounded by natural or man-made barriers of wetlands, parks, railroads 
or major highways, and by Industry or other non-residential areas. Neighborhood stores would be 
located on the fringe or between neighborhoods. The theory goes on to suggest that a group of 
these neighborhood units should constitute a "community," which in turn is served by an 
Intermediate High School at a reasonably central location among the neighborhoods involved; 
and that a group of communities should be served by a High School, civic center and a central 
business district. 

The size of a "neighborhood unit" was suggested by Perry as the population which would 
support an ideal elementary school within walking distance from the outer limits of the unit. The 
units would thus vary in size with the density of residential development and the numbers of 
school children. By dividing the large city or town into these neighborhood units and then 
development it is hoped that "identity of place" and "neighborliness" will provide new meaning 
for community life. 

Although the conditions, theories and policies which underlie the "Neighborhood Theory" 
have changed materially over the years, the Federal Government in making grants for "701 
Planning Projects" continues to require what is called "Neighborhood Analysis" in all Master Plan 
Reports. Accordingly, the discussion of Development Patterns in the body of this report draws 
on the chapters concerning Open Spaces, Streets and Highways, Transportation, etc. for 
definition of boundaries of Neighborhoods; and on the chapters concerning Public Facilities, 
Schools, etc. for service of Neighborhoods. 

The present Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map provides for three kinds of Residential Districts 
according to densities or size of lots: 

"R' - Rural Districts with minimum lot area of 60,000 sq. ft. and 200 foot frontage 

"SRA" - Single Residence A - lot area 22,500 sq. ft. and 125 foot frontage; and 

"SRB" - Single Residence - B - lot area 10,000 sq. ft. and 100 foot frontage. 

The areas shown on the Zoning Map for these Residential Districts reflect the lot sizes in 
"active" subdivision projects at the time the zoning provisions were adopted. The By-Law also 
provides that "a dwelling may be erected . . . having less than the required lot frontage ... or 
area" when the lot "conformed" with requirements in 1934 or is shown on a definitive 
subdivision plan approved after 1954. Although the State Law permitting development of 5000 
sq. ft. lots is no longer applicable in Wilmington (because of the special Act approved in 1969) 
there are still a great many sub-standard lots, - mostly on "paper streets," - which can legally be 
built upon. 

The "R" - Rural districts in Wilmington are generally: 

1) South of Butters Row and Mill Road to the Burlington Line, including the Town Forest, 
well field and extensive wetlands along Cold Spring and Saw Mill Brooks. 



Cf. "Design of Residential Areas" by Whitten and Adams in Harvard City Planning Series Vol. 
VI, 1929. 



28 



2) West Wilmington - west of Shawsheen Avenue to the River and Billerica Line and 
northwest of Aldrich Road and Kendall Street. 

3) Northwest Wilmington - north of Salem Street to 600 feet south of the abandoned 
railroad line and west of the main line of the railroad to the Tewksbury Line. A large 
part of the northeastern half of the area in wetland. 

4) Northeast - in the Nod Pond area and along the North Reading Line from Martins Brook 
to Route 125. The Well Field at Nod Pond separates the section along Andover Street 
from the rest of the "R" District, and a well field and numerous non-conforming 
lots - mostly "Town Owned" or Tax Delinquent lie south of Route 125. 

5) The Northern Tip - above the Industrial Zone and Route 125 to Andover Line. The area 
west and north of Fosters Pond is proposed for a Town Forest in association with a 
similar use of lands in Andover - as projected by the Andover authorities. 

In all of these areas the large lot-size required appears to be appropriate, but, as in all other 
Towns today, the "validity" of large lots is being challenged as "Snob Zoning." The challenge is 
clearly not applicable to Wilmington where so large a proportion of the Town is zoned for 10,000 
or 22,500 square foot lots. In fact, considering the soil conditions and the high proportion of the 
total area of the Town which is wetlands, there is a real question as to the ability of many of the 
smaller lots to handle the sanitary wastes of even a single dwelling without polluting the ground 
waters. 

Other towns have attempted to deal with this problem by including provisions in the Zoning 
By-Law to require that at least half of any lot shall be "buildable" land - and not too wet, steep 
or rocky to accomodate a septic tank and leaching field. 

The "SRA" and "SRB" - Single Residence Districts cover all of the rest of the Town except 
the Business and Industrial areas described below. In general the "10,000 area" - SRB District 
applies to scattered subdivisions within the larger SRA Districts except for a substantial area at 
Silver Lake and north of Glen Road. For practically all the "SRB" areas, the disposal of sanitary 
wastes is a cause of growing concern because continued development may "tip the scales" to 
compel installation of municipal sewerage. 

Residential Development is also permitted in a Neighborhood Business District, and under 
"special permit" under very limited conditions in the GB-General Business and Industrial 
Districts. 

For the past three years, petitions have been filed for inclusion in the Town Warrant to 
permit apartments, garden apartments, motels and other residential developments. To date, these 
proposals have failed approval by the Town Meeting. At the same time, the Planning Board has 
been considering alternative policies and procedures for Multi-Family Dwellings and Planned Unit 
Development. The problems involved are discussed in Part II in the Chapter on "Development 
Patterns" with a recommendation that the Town provide for "Planned Unit Development" with 
combinations of group housing and service business under prescribed rules and limitations. 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 



Industrial Districts have been established and developed: 

1 ) In Southeast Wilmington in three connected blocks - for AVCO south of Lowell Street, 
on both sides of the railroad between Main and Woburn Streets and in the DiCenso 
Project east of Wobum Street to Interstate 93. Provisions for buffer areas around the 
residential areas and for industrial traffic across the residence districts are recommended. 
Safeguards are also needed against or for guidance of strip commercial development of 
frontages on Lowell and Main Streets. 

2) In the central area - particularly west of the railroad and along part of Main Street where 
boundary adjustments require further study. 

3) East of Interstate 93 and north of Concord Street along Fordham Road (Barbo Project) 
where again provisions for buffer areas adjoining residential districts are needed. 

4) Two smaller Industrial Districts are shown on the Zoning Map - between Lubbers Brook 
and the railroad south of Concord Street and between Middlesex Avenue and the 
railroad south of the North Wilmington Grade Crossing. Both these sites are already 
occupied by Industries. The wetlands along Lubbers Brook severely restrict the size of 
the first of these districts and wetlands south of the second provide a buffer for the 
adjoining residential area. 

5) North of Salem Street, - Nod Pond to the North Reading Line at the gravel pits, where a 
problem exists as to the "restoration" and future best use of the area after the gravel 
deposits are exhausted. 

6) In the Northern Part of Wilmington along Route 125, Interstate 93, Ballardvale and 
Andover Streets. 

a. South of Route 125, most of the Industrial District west of the Electric 
Transmission line to 1-93 is either wet or well field; while northeast of the electric 
line, existing houses along Andover Street and extensive wetlands suggest that 
further study of this area would be advisable. 

b. North of Route 125 a current project for a "Route 125 Industrial Park" involves 
the extension of Upton Court for access to new Industrial Sites. This road should 
eventually be carried through to Ballardvale Street. Another road across this 
Industrial District is also proposed on the Streets and Highways Plan, and further 
study is needed on the appropriateness of the present arbitrary, straight-line, 
northern boundary of the Industrial District in relation to future resident 
development on the north. 

c. West of Interstate 93, almost all of the Industrial District east of the railroad is wet, 
while west of the railroad wetlands extend along the Tewksbury line leaving- only a 
completely unaccessible island around the former Wilmington Junction. It is 
therefore most unlikely that any of this area west of 1-93 will be developed in the 
foreseeable future. 

In summary, the Industrial Districts in the Southeast, Central, and Eastern sections of the 
Town are fast filling up, and in the Northern Sections development is beginning. There is room 



30 



for considerable further expansion of industry in Wilmington, but action is needed to assure the 
best boundaries for industrial districts, "buffers" along those boundaries, access to sites and 
across adjoining residential areas and guidance of "strip" frontage development on major streets. 
Additional areas suitable for industrial development are practically non-existent. 

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT 

Business Development in Wilmington began around the railroad stations in the center and 
North Wilmington, and with "convenience" shops in scattered locations. The present zoning 
provides for General Business and Neighborhood Business Districts, - shown on the Zoning Map 
at: 

1) North Wilmington for a small area on both sides of the railroad and adjoining an 
Industrial District. Most of the frontage is already occupied so that a grade separation of 
Middlesex Avenue with the railroad will be disruptive and difficult - but probably 
inevitable. It may be possible to expand the Business District to the north along 
Jefferson Avenue. 

2) 350 feet of frontage on the north side of Lowell Street between West Street and the 1-93 
Interchange - now occupied by a filling station. The adjoining Neighborhood Business 
District on the east will be wiped out by the completion of the Interchange, but the 
similar district on the west is ample for local business. 

3) At the southeast corner of Lowell and Woburn Streets, Lucci occupies the 
General Business District with its local shopping facihties. 

4) Strip frontage on the north side of Lowell Street from 200 feet west of Woburn Street to 
Dartmouth St. -with some scattered development. Since the opposite side of Lowell 
Street is all zoned Industrial - also permitting strip-business development, the two sides 
of the street must be considered together. This situation portends all the unfortunate 
aspects of "strip-zoning" with attendant traffic snarls, unsightly development and 
"blight." We long since learned that healthy business development requires con- 
centration on in-depth sites to provide for one-stop parking and comparative-price 
shopping. 

5) A similar combination of Industry and General Business Districts is shown on the 
Zoning Map for both sides of Main Street for two and one half miles from the Woburn 
Line and Cook Street to Richmond Street, interrupted for only a short distance at Clark 
Street, and by the Town Forest or where major streams cross the> road. Much of this 
frontage is committed to existing industrial and business uses and the necessity of depth 
was recognized at Wilmington Plaza. Three sections of this long strip-zoning require 
attention : 

a. South of the Town Forest, as to the value of a narrow 150 foot strip for either 
business or industry on the west side of Main Street; 

b. Between the railroad overpass and Lowell Street, the wetlands along Maple Meadow 
Brook reduce the available area for development on both sides of the street, and the 
question should be raised whether the triangle between Main and Lowell Streets 
northwest of the brook is an appropriate or best location for a second major 



31 



shopping center? If it is, the whole triangle should be zoned and planned for that 
purpose, and if it is not the zoning should be revised in the opposite direction. 

c. From Lowell Street to Richmond Street, the opening of a New Route 129 By-Pass 
(Olson Street) will require major changes in the zoning boundaries east of Main 
Street as shown on the Plan for that project. These changes would extend the GB 
Zone to the west side of the new highway between Kiernan Avenue and Kirk Street 
and from opposite Bridge Land to opposite Richmond Street. 

6) In 1969 the Town voted to re-zone the area between Interstate 93 and the Town Line 
and south of Concord Street to the Ipswich River to GB-General Business. The adjoining 
areas in North Reading and across Concord Street are zoned for Industry. 

7) Other Neighborhood Business Districts shown on the Zoning Map include: 

a. Some 1 200 feet of frontage on the south side of Concord Street between Lubbers 
Brook and the railroad, backed up by an industrial District. The N.B. Zoning 
restricts the kinds of business beyond those allowed in Industrial Districts, but the 
200 foot depth is inadequate for parking, buildings, etc. Access is restricted to 
Concord Street and the area is cut off or buffered (according to one's point of view) 
from the residential neighborhoods it would serve by the railroad and Lubbers 
Brook. 

b. Two small areas at Silver Lake and Main Street, - one south of the lake to Lubbers 
Brook on both sides of the highway and the other on the southeast corner of Main 
and Oakwood Road. In both cases the depth is inadequate, and the zoning would 
appear to be intended to legalize small existing business activities. 

c. Two "spot zones" of single lots, - one at Burlington Ave. and Forest Street and the 
other at Shawsheen Ave. and Hopkins Street, -in both cases to accomodate 
previously existing stores. They are both probably illegal under the Supreme Court 
ruling on Spot Zoning. 

The survival of these two neighborhood stores in the part of Wilmington west of the railroad 
points up the need to provide in plans for that section one or two larger Neighborhood Business 
Districts to serve the future population. Similar additional Neighborhood Business Districts will 
some day be needed near Salem Street between the railroad and the Tewksbury line, and to serve 
the extreme north section of the Town. 



32 



PROPOSED ZONING ACTIONS 



To guide further development and to protect and enhance the "quality of the environment", 
your Consultant recommends: 

1 . Adoption of Flood Plain and Conservancy Zoning with appHcation to the wetlands for 
"shaping" of neighborhoods and protection of developed areas against floods, pollution, 
etc., and supporting actions as recommended in the following section "b. Open Spaces." 

2. Addition of an "Institutional or Public Use" District apphed to Public and Tax Exempt 
Institutional Properties. 

3. Buildable Area. Addition to the Zoning By-law of a requirement that at least half of any 
lot shall be "buildable" land and not too wet, steep, or rocky to accomodate septic tank 
and leaching fields. 

4. Zoning changes in relation to opening of "New Route 129" (By-Pass). 

5. Provision for variety and mixture of residential types in Planned Unit Development or 
"Clusters." 

6. Further and continuing review of the Zoning Map for possible desirable changes or 
adjustments, with particular attention to : 

a. Soil conditions of each "SRB" District in relation to disposal of sanitary wastes; 

b. Substitution of concentrated, in depth, business areas for "strip zoning" along 
major thorofares; and of continuous review of the wording of the Zoning By-Law 
for adjustment to changing conditions, refinements and clarification. 

HISTORIC DISTRICTS 

The chapter of this Report on "Historical Background" emphasizes the special values in the 
character of areas around the Town Common and at other historic sites. Under Chapter 40 C of 
the General Laws, cities and towns can establish "Historic Districts" with a Commission having 
authority to issue "Certificates of appropriateness" for changes in the external appearance of 
buildings and structures in such Districts. Action for this purpose by the Tovm Meeting is 
required to follow a report by an Historic District Study Committee. 

Your Planning Consultant urges early and intensive study of the desirability of Historic 
Districts in Wilmington, and action by the Town Meeting to take advantage of the powers granted 
under Chapter 40 C. General Laws. 



33 



OPEN SPACE PLAN 



A N D O V E R 



PUBLIC AND SEMI-PUBLIC OWNED LAND 
(EXISTING AND PROPOSED) 

FLOOD PLAIN OR CONSERVANCY ZONING 

EASEMENTS 



[l],.-, EXISTING 



SCHOOL SITES 



!JPI\ PROPOSED 
Q NEIGHBORHOOD GREENS 

TOWN BEACHES 
SKATING PONDS 

BOATING FACILITIES (SAILING, ROWING 
CAMPING 
PICNICKING 
«:> FISHING ACCESS SITES 
COURT SPORTS 
PUBLIC GOLF COURSE 



b 

sk 



wp 




SCENIC OUTLOOK 

TRAILS AND PATHS 

PEDESTRIAN- SAFE STREETS 

WILDLIFE PRESERVE 

OPEN SPACES DESIRABLE FOR 
FUTURE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT 



Wl LM I NGTO N 

WILMINGTON PLANNING BOARD 
CHARLES W. ELIOT, PLANNING CONSULTANT 



0.5 mile 1.0 



B. OPEN SPACE PLAN 



The Open Space Plan for Wilmington, - prepared in the Consultant's office by Roy Mann, 
Landscape Architect, - was presented to a large meeting of Town Officials and Citizens at the 
Public Library on September 16, 1969. The Plan builds directly on the previous proposals in the 
1957 General Plan, 1960 School and Recreation Report, and the Hill and Associates School 
Planning Study; as well as on the Land Use Map, the studies of the Conservation Commission, 
and the Interpretive Soil Survey. In addition, references are made in the Plan Report to the Open 
Space Plans of the Metropolitan Area Planning Council, the Department of Natural Resources, 
Water Resources Commission, Ipswich River Watershed Commission and to studies by Whitman 
and Howard for Water Supply, Sewerage and Drainage. 

Proposed Open Spaces in the Plan reflect the unusually large proportion of the Town which 
are Wetlands (partially protected by the Hatch Act and Inland Wetlands Act) and of great 
importance for water supply to not only Wilmington but also to all the cities and towns drawing 
from the Ipswich River. Differing degrees of protection and ownership of these wetlands are 
proposed according to the kind and degree of pubhc interest or use which is involved. Flood Plain 
Zoning under the Police Power is proposed for areas subject to flooding along all the principal 
streams and Conservancy Zoning is recommended for the extensive headwater swamps. 
Conservation Easements can appropriately back-up zoning where public access is not involved, 
and rights of way are sufficient in many cases for bridle or bicycle paths; but for well-fields, 
water storage areas, recreation, stream corridors, etc., fee ownership is recommended. 

The features of the water or wetland-oriented portions of the Open Space Plan are two 
possible storage-recreation reservoirs on Maple Meadows and Lubbers and a wild life area on Mill 
Brook - all near or on the Burlington line; a Central Conservation Area between the High School 
and proposed South Intermediate School at the confluence of Mill Brook and Maple Meadow 
Brook; and major "recreation areas" on Martins and Gowings Brook and at Nod Pond. Sections 
of the Middlesex Canal (and Taylor's Pond) are proposed for preservation; and paths, pedways or 
trails would be developed along the Canal and several streams to provide access to recreation and 
school areas. All of the shores of Silver Lake would be set aside for recreational use. 

The northernmost and highest point in Wilmington is proposed as a Town Forest, and lands 
and facilities for "active" recreation are proposed to be provided in association with schools 
wherever possible. A system of neighborhood "greens" is also included in the Open Space Plan. 

To implement the Open Space Plan, the Planning Consultant has recommended: 

1. A concerted campaign for gifts of land or of easements; and, where gifts are not 
forthcoming for the negotiation of options to purchase either fee title or easements; 

2. Establishment by the Town Meeting of a Revolving Fund for options and/or purchases, 
reimbursable when purchases are consummated or State-Federal Grants received. 

3. Assignment by Town Meeting of "Town-Owned" parcels in open space projects to 
Conservation Commission, Water Commissioners, School Board or other appropriate 
agency; 

4. Inauguration of procedure to clear "tax-title properties" to degree appropriate for 
further assignment by the Town Meeting to appropriate agencies. 



35 



5. Authorization and Appropriation by the Town Meeting of funds for acquisition of lands 
and/or rights in land, with early action for: 

a. Completion of Hathaway Acres-Martins Brook Project; 

b. Consolidation of properties in the Central Valley Project, with lands now assigned 
to Conservation Commission and Town-Owned and Tax-Title properties; 

c. Similar consoHdation of properties in Upper Mill Brook and Upper Lubbers Brook 
Valleys; 

d. Completion of Silver Lake Project; and 

e. Additions to School Sites for recreation - particularly at 

1) High School, 2) North Intermediate, 3) Woburn, etc. and new sites for 1) South 
Intermediate, 2) Taylor's Pond Elementary and on 3) Salem Street, etc. 

6. Opening Negotiations with Ipswich River Commission and neighboring towns con- 
cerning projects in which they are involved ; 

7. Approval by the Town Meeting of provisions in the Zoning By-Law for a Flood Plain 
District and for application to areas subject to flooding along principal streams, and 

8. Extension of Flood Plain (or Conservancy) Zoning to additional wetland areas as reliable 
data becomes available on levels and boundaries of areas subject to perennial floods. 

9. Clarification and simplification of jurisdiction and responsibilities of Town agen- 
cies - such as Park and Recreation Commission, Conservation Commission, Water 
Commissioners, etc. for care, protection, maintenance and development of Open Space 
Properties. 

10. Authority to designated agencies to formulate and issue "rules and regulations" 
governing uses of open spaces assigned to their care. 

This listing of recommended immediate actions is not, of course, exclusive, and should not 
inhibit or delay consideration of other possibilities of timing or financing any or all of the Open 
Space proposals. Your Consultant has pointed out, for instance, that the most economical 
procedure to carry out the Open Space Plan would probably be to acquire all the needed lands 
and rights-in-land now in a single "package." The value of those lands is sure to increase as the 
pressures of Metropolitan Development continue to grow; and State and Federal assistance 
appears to be assured up to 75 percent of the costs. 

C. STREETS AND HIGHWAYS 

The studies and planning for alleviation of traffic congestion, service of industrial and 
commercial developments, and for provision of adequate routes for "through" traffic have 
produced a proposed Street and Highway Plan. This Plan and the report explaining it propose a 
system of major streets in five categories: Expressways; Primary, Secondary and Tertiary 
Routes, and Collector Streets. 



37 



The Expressways in Wilmington are Interstate Highway 93 and State Highway 125, and the 
threatened "Middle Belt." The Plan calls for a Lowell Connector or "Cain Highway" to be 
added. 

The Primary Routes (100 foot Right of Way) shown on the Plan are: 

1 . The New Route 1 29 - by-passing the central section of Main Street from Shawsheen 
Ave. via the Richmond St. Bridge to the "Olson St." alignment and Lowell Street. 

2. Lowell Street from 1-93 to Wobum Street; and 

3. Wobum Street from the Wobum hne to Eames Street, and a new - 

4. Extension of Eames Street to Lowell Street. 

The Secondary Routes (80-66 foot Right of Way) are: 

1 . All of Main Street - Route 38 ; 

2. A new Alternative 38 extending a project in Wobum from the Wobum line through the 
Redevelopment Project, to Main Street at the Greer Plant; 

3. A West Street By-Pass - from Suncrest Ave. to Lowell Street; 

4. Route 62 - with adjustments for railroad grade separations at North Wilmington and at 
Route 38, easing comers and altemative location for Burlington Avenue; 

5. Connection of Route 125 to Route 62 via Ballardvale at the North Intermediate School, 
and a new street; 

6. A Cross-Town Route via Concord, a new road north of and crossing Glen Road to the 
new Richmond Street Bridge, and by Aldrich Road and a new street to Forest Street 
and the Burlington Line; and 

7. "Orleans" Street from opposite Eames Street Extension to opposite Wildwood at 
Woburn. 

The Tertiary Routes (60 foot Right of Way) shown on the Plan include: 

1 . Industrial Way and the proposed "Bachman Way" in the DiCenso Industrial Area; 

2. West Street, southeast of Suncrest Ave.; 

3. Eames Street and McKelvey Street into Wobum; 

4. Chestnut Street, connected with Boutwell Street, and extended to Hopkins and Lake 
Streets; 

5. Burlington Avenue; 

6. Western portions of Forest, Aldrich and Hopkins Streets; 

7. Shawsheen Avenue and Nichols Avenue 

8. Salem Street - outside Route 62; 

9. Middlesex Ave., - outside Route 62; 

10. Wobum-Andover from Wildwood to Andover Line; 

1 1 . Ballardvale Street; and 

12. A new road from "Cain Highway" Interchange to Route 125 to serve the Industrial 
District in that part of the Town. 



39 



The Implementation and effectiveness of the Streets and Highways Plan calls for immediate 
attention and action in three categories: 

First priority concerns Route 129 -now along Lowell and Main Streets and Shawsheen 
Avenue - to provide a New Route 1 29 as a State Highway, but with immediate action to provide 
the right-of-way for the project by layout of road hnes and/or building lines. Beginning with the 
already committed project for a new bridge over the railroad (at Richmond Street) and 
approached from Shawsheen Avenue at Aldrich Street to Main Street; and continuing 
southeasterly on a new right-of-way by a long curve to about 900 feet east of the Wilmington 
Plaza and roughly parallel with Main Street (including Olson Street) to join Lowell and Main 
Streets near the intersection of those roads. It is recommended that this New Route 129 be 
"layed out" at a width of 100 feet with or without the cooperation of the county and the State 
Department of Public Works, but with renewed and constant pressure for State participation and 
action. 

For the Lowell Street portion of Route 129, it is recommended that: 

a. The Selectmen "lay out" a widening of Lowell Street from Interstate 93 to Woburn 
Street at 100 feet and establish a building line for Lowell Street from Woburn Street to Main 
Street to safeguard a future right-of-way of 80 feet in that section and that 

b. The State Department of Public Works take immediate steps to acquire the land 
necessary to provide the two missing lobes of the Interchange between Interstate 93 and Route 
129. 

Second priority involves service to industrial developments and provision of access and egress 
from the DiCenso Industrial Park and projects on Woburn and Fames Streets. It is recommended 
that: 

a. to free West Street of heavy truck traffic, the Selectmen lay out and the Town undertake 
to improve a new 80 foot "no-frontage" street from the corner of West Street and Suncrest 
Avenue, along the east edge of the so-called "Hospital Site", to the widened Lowell Street 
recommended above. 

b. to provide for traffic now using narrow Woburn Street, south of Lowell Street, that the 
Selectmen 

1. Lay out a widening of Woburn Street from the Woburn line to Fames Street to 100 
feet (now 50 feet); and 

2. Lay out an Fxtension of Fames Street with 100 foot right-of-way from Woburn 
Street to the widened Lowell Street opposite Orleans Street. 

3. Seek the cooperation of the State in the replacement of the Fames Street Bridge 
over the main line of the railroad with appropriate widening and/or realighment of 
the roadway. 

c. to provide an Alternate Route 38, alleviating traffic on Main Street, that the Town 
cooperate with the City of Woburn in development of a major street using the abandoned 
railroad right-of-way in Woburn, across the Wilmington Redevelopment Project and Fames Street 
to Main Street south of the Greer Plant. 



40 



Third priority among the street and highway projects requiring immediate attention should 
go to proposals for a "Middle Belt" and other through routes across the Town. It is 
recommended that: 

a. The Town continue and intensify its opposition, in association with other towns, to the 
so-called "Middle Belt" expressway across Wilmington by either of the routes surveyed and 
studied by Highway Consultants (Howard, Needles) to the State Department of Public Works; 
but, at the same time and in recognition of the need for improved facilities for east-west traffic 
across Wilmington over those now provided by Route 62 and other local streets, that 

b. The Town take early action to develop the proposed East-West Route shown on the 
General Plan using a widened Concord Street, new road from Middlesex Avenue opposite 
Concord-Federal Street to the new Route 1 29 (Richmond Street) Bridge, and via Aldrich Street 
and new parallel roads to Aldrich and Forest Streets, to the Town line at Burlington Avenue. 

A fourth Priority involves Nichols Street where a new bridge over the railroad is under 
construction. Funds associated with that project will "lapse" unless immediate steps are taken to 
use them for widening the bridge approaches, on both sides of the bridge - to Shawsheen Avenue 
on the east and to the Tewksbury Line on the west. The right of way should be 60 feet in width 
(50 foot minimum) to provide the same roadway as at the bridge and at least one sidewalk. 

These priority projects are, of course, only a few of the many proposals for street and 
highway improvements in the General Plan; and immediate attention to those cited above must 
not preclude concern with protection of opportunities to carry out other important projects 
against developments and buildings in their paths. Some of these other projects can be 
implemented as properties through which the proposed major routes would pass are subdivided. 
Still others may require emergency action to establish building-lines. The Planning Board and 
other Town Officials must be vigilant in protection and adjustment of the Street and Highway 
plan. 

OTHER TRANSPORTATION ELEMENTS 

The conflicts between highway and rail transportation facilities require continuance of the 
program for new and improved grade separations beyond the Nichols Avenue and New Richmond 
Street Bridge Projects now under construction or "in planning." Next in line are: 

New Route 129 over the Wildcat Railroad; 
Burlington Ave. (Route 62) replacement; 
Middlesex Ave. (Route 62) in North Wilmington; 

Alternate Route 62 (Concord to Richmond Street Bridge) with grade 

separations at B & M Line and the Wildcat ; 
Replacement of bridges at Lake Street, Butters Row and possibly Fames 

Street. 

Passenger service by rail, rapid transit and buses must be continued and improved. As 
discussed in Part II of this Report, "Budd-liner" service on the railroads will presumably be 
continued under contract or directly by the M.B.T.A. and there is need for expanded parking 
faciUties at each stop with some more equitable allocation of costs for both the rail service and 



for the provision of parking facilities. Among the several terminal points under discussion for the 
"Orange" Rapid Transit Line, the most advantageous to Wilmington appears to be at Route 129 
(Lowell Street) with the recommended 3000 parking facilities northeast of the Interchange with 
Interstate 93 in Reading. 

Electric and telephone Wires now carried on overhead lines along many Wilmington roads 
might be put underground with Town-Utility cooperation under Chapter 766 - Acts of 1 969. The 
Town should seek underground installation of all new extensions and replacements of existing 
overhead lines. 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

Several subjects discussed separately in the main body of the Report can be summarized 
under this heading, including 

Schools and Recreation 

Other Public Buildings and Services 

Water, Sewer and Waste Disposal 

Schools and Recreation are grouped together in pursuance of the present policy in 
Wilmington to make effective use of school plants for "out of school hours" use by the 
community. 

The School Studies by Hill and Associates have been used in the General Planning Project 
with general concurrence with the policies and programs for 

1 . Phasing out the older schools with conversion of several of them to recreational or other 
uses: 

a. West School - to Well-field 

b. Center School - for Town Offices 

c. Buzzell School - for Curriculum Center 



d. Swain School - for School Administration 

e. Whitefield School - for Recreation Center 

f. Rogers School - for recreation facility at Silver Lake 

g. Walker School - previously (1957) for Town Hall or now for Recreation Center with 
Rotary Park. 

Detailed discussion of these possibilities is contained in the Open Space Plan. 

2. Acquistion of sufficient additional land to accommodate both school needs and 
community use of facilities at: 

a. The High School - with the currently proposed major addition to the build- 
ings - towards Wildwood Street and to the east; 

b. Site for future South Intermediate or Elementary School - east of Maple Meadow 
Brook and north of the gas pipeUne (Allen and other properties) of at least 20 acres 
adjoining Conservation Project. 

c. Additions to North Intermediate, Woburn, Wildwood and other Schools; and 

d. New Sites for future Schools including 

1 . South Elementary - southwest of Taylor's Pond 

2. Northeast Elementary - N.W. corner Salem and Woburn Streets 

3. Northwest Elementary. North of Salem and West of R.R. 

3. School Building Projects - currently (April 1970) under discussion - include a major 
addition to the High School and either additions to the North Intermediate and West 
Intermediate Schools or a new South Intermediate School. 

Other Public Buildings and Facilities 

In spite of the recommendations in the General Plan of 1957 and in the 1960 Report on 
"Capital Budget" for consolidation of offices, meeting rooms, library, pohce and fire stations, 
laboratories, garages, sheds, etc. in a "Town Center", Wilmington has instead constructed, rented 
or adapted separate facilities in separate structures for fire, pohce, public works, cemetery, 
library. Planning Board and conservation, school administration and for the water and Public 
Building departments; and rearranged the Town Hall at intervals to adjust as well as possible to 
pressures for additional space and services. 

The result of this "policy" or lack of poUcy, is that the Town's business is now conducted in 
over twelve different buildings scattered over the Town. PoUcies recommended to meet this 
situation are: 

1 . Maximum use should be made of existing structures and faciUties already owned by the 
Town; but 

a. For the convenience of citizens doing business with Town Officials and De- 
partments, and 

b. For the efficient conduct of the pubhc business - 

■i 



^3 



2. Administrative and Business activities of Town Departments should be concentrated in 
the same building, area or part of Town. 

a. Economy and Efficiency in the use of space, equipment and services dictate - 

3. Garages, Equipment Sheds and Equipment for pubhc works, maintenance of buildings 
and grounds, etc. should be grouped for joint use, care and protection. 

4. Police, Fire and Civil Defense should be served by and service a single communication, 
system. 

a. The large investment in buildings, plant, grounds, etc. for a single purpose such as 
schools, emphazises the importance of further efforts to continue and expand the 
present "policy" that - 

5. Multiple uses of school plants and other pubhc buildings should be arranged whenever 
possible (such as community use of Schools in out-of-school hours, use of Library for 
school library, use of well-fields for certain kinds of recreation, etc.). 

Specifically - the long-range plans call for: 

1 . Concentration of Administrative and Business activities of the Town and School Department 
on the Center-Swain-Buzzell Site in converted or new structures; 

2. A centralized fire-police-communication service developed around the present Fire and 
Police Stations on Church Street at Olson and Adelaide Streets with needed additions; 

3. Future Fire Sub-Stations in North and West Wilmington; 

4. Grouping of Garage, Sheds and Equipment for all departments. 

Water and Sewer Facilities have been the subjects of study and reports by Whitman and 
Harvard - Civil Engineers over the years, and their recommendations have been used as the basis 
for those aspects of planning which affect or are effected by their proposals. The General Plan 
also takes into consideration other related aspects such as: 

For Water Supply - rehance on the Ipswich River for water supply to other cities and 
towns, the need for impoundment or detention reservoirs on the watershed to augment 
low flows, the possible need for supplemental water from outside the watershed, and 
the "multiple" or recreational use of reservoirs, well fields, etc. 

The General Plan proposes two "reservoirs" on sites identified by the Soil Conservation 
Service in the Ipswich River Study of 1 9 : 

a. On Maple Meadow Brook with a dam at the Middlesex Canal Crossing to elevation 86 or 
90 which will back water up to Chestnut Street at several points and almost to the 
Burlington Line on Cold Spring Brook; and 

b. On Lubbers Brook at the middle pond where a future extension of Boutwell Street will 
cross, and backing water into Billerica and Burlington to approximately elevation 102 or 
104. 

These reservoirs might logically be constructed by the Ipswich River Watershed Commission, 
but Wilmington will have to request the Commission to do so. 



The Open Space Plan proposes the recreational use of Well fields to the greatest extent 
possible without endangering the purity of the water supply. 

For Sewers , the Town has appHed for Federal Assistance to extend the existing sewers 
which drain into the M.D.C. Trunk at the Woburn line and in general accordance with 
the plans presented with the 1965 Kilgore Report of Whitman & Howard, Inc. 

The order and timing for the provision of sewerage in Wilmington must reflect the growth of 
the Town and the ability of the soils to absorb septic tank overflows and to serve as leaching 
fields. The planning policies for guidance of development as proposed in this General Plan Report 
would attempt to postpone the heavy investment required for sewerage, to take maximum 
advantage of Federal and State aid, and to order construction in consonance with zoning changes 
and the progress of building development. The Town must accept the hard fact that control of 
pollution of the Water Supplies in the Ipswich River Basin will sooner or later require the 
construction of a sewerage on the scale of the plans in the Kilgore Report. 

Solid Waste Disposal is now handled in Wilmington by contract with a private contractor 
who operates a dump west of Old Main Street near the Edison Co. Transmission Line and Cold 
Spring Brook. The dump is close to the Brook and someday may pollute its waters. Recent 
legislation places further limits on the general practice of waste disposal in "dumps." The area in 
which the present dump is located is shown on the General Plan as inundated by the proposed 
Maple Meadow Reservoir. 

It is recommended that the Town explore with adjoining Municipalities the possibilities for a 
Regional Solid Waste Disposal Facihty or Facilities. The expenses involved in land, structures 
(incinerator) equipment and operation appear to be so great that no single municipality can 
afford to "go it alone" on Waste disposal. Naturally, the site of a Waste disposal Facility will 
reflect the convenience of the particular group of municipalities it is to serve. Thus, if the region 
centers around Woburn a site at or near the present Woburn Dump would appear appropriate ; or, 
if Wilmington joins with Andover and North Reading in such a project one of the "devasted" 
gravel pits in the north end of Wilmington may be the best site. Negotiations are the first step, 
- to arrange with a group of municipalities for necessary studies and plans by a qualified firm of 
Sanitary Engineers. 

Health Facihties . Public-spirited citizens have organized a campaign to construct a hospital in 
Wilmington and have acquired a site for that purpose on the south side of Lowell Street, west of 
West Street. It is not clear at this writing as to how a hospital or other health facility in 
Wilmington will fit into the "hierarchy" of such facilities on a regional basis. There is no 
Metropolitan Plan for Health Facilities although the experts in the field are all agreed that a 
regional approach to the problems of health care is essential to make the best use of the limited 
financial resources which are available to cover the huge costs. It is recommended that those 
concerned for health services in Wilmington continue and press their efforts to secure "regional" 
agreements and participation in further actions for a hospital or other health facility which may 
be located in Wilmington. 



Index 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 54 

Board of Appeals 48 

Board of Assessors 9 

Board of Health 34 

Board of Registrars 11 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Boards, Committees, and Commissions 7 

Building Inspector 30 

By-Law Study Committee 19 

iCemetery Department Z4 

Conservation Commission 42 

Constable 58 

!:Directory of Officials 6 

Dog Officer 38 

Drug Committee 23 

■Fire Department 25 

Highway Department 26 

[Jury List 44 

Librarian 40 

Library Trustees 39 

Permanent Building Committee 43 

Planning Board 18 

Police Department 20 

Public Buildings Department 31 

Recreation Commission 27 

I Redevelopment Authority 59 

jReserve Fund Transfers 60 

[iSchool Committee 61 

i Sealer of Weights & Measures 47 

iShawsheen Valley Technical School 70 

. superintendent of Schools 64 

Town Accountant . 131 

Town Clerk 12 

. Town Collector 10 

Town Counsel 14 

Town Manager 2 

Town Meeting .Annual Town Meeting - March 7, 1970 75 

. State Primary Sept. 15, 1970 Ill 

.State Election Nov. 3, 1970 114 

. Special Town Meeting . Nov. 21, 1970 119 

i " own T rea surer 17 

ree Department 28 

j ''eterans Agent 29 

/ater & Sewer Department 32 



i-ppendix: Comprehensive Master Plan Summary 



n iHemonam 



FIRE ALARM SIGNALS 



32 Boutwell School 

33 Buzzell School 
35 Center School 

37 Glen Rd. School 

38 High School 

41 Mildred Rogers School 

42 North Intermediate 

School 

43 West School 

44 Swain School 

46 Walker School 

47 West Intermediate School 

48 West School 

49 Shawsheen School 
51 Whitefield School 

53 Wlldwood School 

54 Woburn Street School 

121 Main & Church Sts. 

122 Main & Middlesex Ave 
1222 Carr Fastener 

123 Main & Clark Sts. 

124 Washington Ave. 

125 Wilmington Plaza 

126 Main St. & Bridge Lane 

127 Brand Ave. & Wiser St. 

1 28 Baker St. & Taplin Ave. 

129 Phillips Ave. & Wiser St. 

131 Hobson Ave. & Miles St. 

132 Main St. & 

Massachusetts Ave. 

133 Massachusetts Ave. & 

River St. 

134 Main & Harnden Sts. 

135 St. Dorothy's Church 

136 Veranda Ave. 

137 Main St. & Grove Ave. 

138 Grove & Wild Aves. 

139 Grove Ave & Burnap St. 

141 Grove Ave. & Lake St. 

142 Main St. & Glen Rd. 

143 Main & Lake Sts. 

144 Lake St. & Warren Rd. 

146 Main & Davis Sts. 

147 Fairfield Ave. 

148 Marjorie Rd. 

149 Main St. at Tewksbury 

Line 

211 Burlington & Floradale 

Aves. 

21 1 1 Diamond Crystal Salt 

Company 

21 12 Sweetheart Plastic Corp. 

212 Burlington Ave. & 

Harris St. 

213 Cedar St. & Burt Rd. 

214 Deming Way (Old Age 

Housing) 

215 Burlington Ave. & 

Chestnut St. 

216 Chestnut St. & 

Butters Row 

217 Chestnut St. & Mill Rd. 

218 Chestnut St. & 

Hillside Way 

219 Hillside Way at 

Burlington Line 

221 Chestnut St. near 

Golf Club 

222 Chestnut St. at Woburn 

Line 

223 Marion & Day Sts. 

224 Marion & Clifton Sts. 

225 Marion St. to 

Chestnut St. 

226 Roberts Road 

227 Burlington Ave. & 

Boutwell St. 

228 Boutwell St. & Taft Rd. 

229 Taft & Swain Rds. 

231 Roosevelt Rd. 

232 Burlington Ave. & 

Dell Drive 

233 Burlington Ave. & 

Swain Rd. 

234 Beech St. 



235 Burlington Ave. & 

Forest St. 

236 Burlington Ave. at 

Burlington Line 

237 Forest St. & Congress St. 

238 Forest St. & 

Randolph Rd. 

239 Forest St. & 

Cochrane Rd. 

241 Elwood Rd. 

242 Forest St. & 

Edwards Rd. 

251 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Canal St. 

252 Canal St. & Burt Rd. 

253 Grand St. 

254 Nassau Ave. & 

Dunton Rd. 

255 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Carter Lane 

256 Carter Lane 

Norfolk St. 

257 Amherst Rd. 

258 Auburn Ave. 

259 Ferguson Rd. 
261 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Aldrich Rd. 
262Aldrich Rd. & 
Hardin St. 

263 Aldrich Rd. & ^ 

Kendall St. 'Wi 

264 Aldrich Rd. & 

Boutwell St. 

265 Aldrich Rd. & Forest St 

266 Winston Ave. 

267 Aldrich Rd. at 

Billerica Line 

268 Shawsheen Ave. near 

Cranberry Bog 

269 Wilton Drive 

271 Shawsheen Ave. & 
Bond St. 

273 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Hopkins St. 

274 Hopkins & Columbia 

Streets 

275 Hopkins & Dorchester 

Streets 

276 Hopkins St. at 

Billerica Line 

277 Shawsheen Ave. & 

Nichols St. 

278 Nichols St. & 

Fairmeadow Rd. 

279 Fairmeadow & 

Jere Rds. 

281 Nichols St. at 

Billerica Line 

282 Shawsheen Ave. at 

Billerica Line 



311 Main St. & Dublin Ave. 

312 Main & Lowell Sts. 
3121 Hayden Mica Co. 

313 Main St. & Butters Row 

314 Main St. at Town Park 

315 Main & EamesSts. 

316 Eames St. 

3i32 Polyvinal Chemical 

3161 J.W. Greer Co. 

3162 National Polychemical 

Co., Inc. 

3163 Dragon Cement Co. 

3164 Raffi SiSwanson Inc. 

317 Cook Ave. 

318 Main St. at Woburn 

Line 

321 Lowell & Parker Sts. 

322 Parker & Blackstone 

Streets 

323 Lowell & Cross Sts. 

324 Lowell & Bay Sts. 
3241 Avco Corp. 

325 Lowell & Woburn Sts. 

326 Woburn & Elm Sts. 



327 Woburn St. & 

Brentwood Ave. 

328 Wobum St. & 

Mors6 Av6, 

329 Woburn & Eames Sts. 

3291 Terrell Corp. 

3292 I nt. Salt 

3293 NAPA 

3294 Ritter Trucking 
3295 Nova Devices 

331 Woburn St. & 

Industrial Way 
3313 Commodity Warehouse 

3314 Market Forge 

3315 Smithcraft 

332 Strout Ave. 

333 Lowell St. & 

Woodland Rd. 

334 Lowell & West Sts. 

335 West St. & Westdale 

Avenue 

336 Ayotte St. & Crest 

Avenue 

337 Nickerson Ave. 

338 West St. & 

Suncrest Ave. 

339 Suncrest Ave. & 

Meadow Lane 

341 West St. & Industrial Way 

Way 

3412 Compugraphics 
3413 Scully Signal 
3415 Ling Electronics 

342 Lowell St., Rte. 93 

and Reading Line 

41 1 Church St., Fire Station 

412 Church & Columbia Sts. 

413 Church & Beacon Sts. 

414 Beacon St. & 

Belmont Ave. 

415 State St. & 

Fairview Ave. 

416 Church & Clark Sts. 

417 Methodist Church 

418 Church St. & 

Thurston Ave. 

419 Church & ActamsSts. 

421 Chandler & Kelley Rds. 

422 Adams St. Ext. 

423 Church St. & 

Middlesex Ave. 
4231 New Library 

424 Middlesex Ave. & 

Adelaide St. 

425 Middlesex Ave. & 

Clark St. 

426 Clark St. & 

Railroad Ave. 

427 Middlesex Ave. & 

Adams St. 

428 St. Thomas' Church 

429 Middlesex Ave. & 

School St. 

431 School St. & Drury Lane 

432 Drury Lane & Loumac Rd. 

433 Powderhouse Circle 

434 Middlesex Ave. & 

Wildwood St. 

435 Wildwood St. near 

Cemetery 

436 Wildwood St. near 

Vets Housing 

437 Wildwood & Woburn 

Streets 

438 Wing Rd. 

51 1 Middlesex Ave. & 

Glen Rd. 

512 Glendale Circle 

513 Glen Rd. & 

Lawrence St. 

514 Lawrence St. & 
Lawrence Ct. 



51 5 LawrerKe St. & 

Hamlin Lane 

516 Gten Rd. at 

R.R. Crossing 

517 Glen Rd. & Fay St. 

518 Glen Rd. a King St. 

519 King St. & Garden 

521 King& Kilby Sts. 

522 King & Broad Sts. 

523 Glen Rd. & Cypress St. 

524 Glen Rd. & Brattle St. 

525 Glen Rd. & Harnden St. 

526 Glen & Miller Rds. 

527 Faulkner & Beeching 

Aves. 

528 Faulkner & Allston 

Aves. 

529 Jones Ave. 

531 Town Hall 

532 Congregational Church 

533 Middlesex Ave. & 

Federal St. 

534 Federal & Concord Streets 

535 Federal & Grant Sts. 

536 Federal & Wilson Sts. 

537 Federal & Lincoln Sts. 

538 Federal & Pershing Sts. 

539 Federal & Library Sts. 

541 Federal & Woburn Sts. 

542 Woburn & West Sts. 

543 West & Kilmarnock Sts. 

545 Woburn St. at 

R.R. Crossing 

546 Concord & Woburn Sts. 
5461 Photon 

547 Concord St. at Rte. 93 
5471 Compugraphics, Concord St, 

5472 Dynamics Research 
5475 Volkswagen 

5478 Machinist for 
Electronics 

5479 Barbo 

548 Concord St. at North 

Reading Line 

549 Woburn St. at 281 

551 Middlesex & Mystic 

Aves. 

551 1 Avco, North Wilmington 

5512 Photon, Inc. 

551 3 D.F. Munroe Paper Co. 

5514 Waltham Door & 

Window Co. 

552 Middlesex Ave. & Shady 

Lane Drive 
5521 Mytron Inc. 

553 Shady Lane Drive & 

Oakdale Rd. 

554 Shady Lane Drive & 

Birchwood Rd. 

555 Shady Lane Drive & 

Sprucewood Rd. 

556 Pinewood & Oakdale 

Roads 

557 Birchwood & Judith Rds. 

558 Shady Lane Drive & 

Lawrence St. 

61 1 No. Wilmington 

Shopping Center 

612 Middlesex Ave. & 

North St. 

613 North St. & 

Pineridge Rd. 

614 North St. & Marcia Rd. 

615 Middlesex Ave. & 

High St. 

616 Linda & Carolyn Rds. 

617 High & Woburn Sts. 

618 Woburn & Park Sts. 

619 Park St. & Gowing Rd. 

621 Gowing & Marcus Rds. 

622 Park St. at No. Reading 

Line 



623 Middlesex Ave. & 

Salem St. 

624 Arlene & Catherine 

Aves. 

625 Barbara & Dorothy 

Aves. 

626 Salem St. at 

R.R. Crossing 

627 Salem & Cunningham 

Streets 

628 Salem St. & 

McDonald Rd. 

629 McDonald Rd. to End 

631 Royal St. 

632 Salem St. at Tewksbury 

Line 

633 Salem & Ballardvale 

Streets 

634 Ballardvale St. at 

Rte. 125 

635 Ballardvale St. st 

No. 21 1 
5351 Charles River Breeding 
Laboratories 

636 Ballardvale St. at 

No. 326 

637 Ballardvale St. at Andovi 

Line 

638 Salem St. at Rte. 93 

639 Salem & Woburn Sts. - 

641 Woburn St. & 

Hathaway Rd. 

642 Hawthorne Rd. 

643 Hathaway & 
Sheridan Rds. 

644 Hathaway & Gunderson 

Roads 

645 Salem St. & Thrush Rd. 

646 Thrush Rd. & 

Marie Drive 

647 Salem St. at North 

Reading Line 

6471 Cronin's Pit 

6472 Benevento's Pit 

648 Woburn & Andover 

Streets 

6481 Pumping Station 

(Water Dept.) 

6482 AInsworth Road 

6483 Highway Dept. 

649 Andover St. & Rte. 125; 

651 Andover St. at No. 319 

652 Andover St. at Andover ' 

Line 



SPECIAL SIGNALS 

1 Test 

2 All out (test 9 a.m. & 

9 p.m.) 

3 Special Call 

4 Brush Fire 

5 Police Call 
666 Civil Defense 

7 Boy Scouts 
22 No School (6:30 a.m., 
7:00 a.m. & 7:15a.m.) 

2 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box - second alarm 

3 Followed by 3 rounds of 

box - general alarm 



MUTUAL AID 
(two rounds only) 
8 Out of Town 

81 To Andover 

82 To Billerica 

83 To Burlington 

84 To Lowell 

85 To No. Reading 

86 To Reading 

87 To Tewksbury 

88 To Woburn 



FIRE - AMBULANCE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3200 

658-3346 



POLICE 
EMERGENCY: 658-3331 

658-5071 
658-5072 
935-5966 



TOWN HALL 

658-3311 
935-5596 



TOWN HALL ANNEX 
657-751 1 



DELANEY PRESS, 



MELROSE, MASS.